MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, November 13th 2018 - 18:49 UTC

Rousseff takes distance from ruling party’s intent to control the Brazilian media

Friday, September 9th 2011 - 09:43 UTC
Full article 8 comments
Minister Bernardo argues there is no urgency to draft a media bill Minister Bernardo argues there is no urgency to draft a media bill

The Brazilian government took distance from the ruling Workers Party demand for an urgent implementation of a controversial media bill, arguing the issue was not urgent.

“The Workers Party has its positions and the government has a program” said this week Paulo Bernardo, Communications Minister and who is in charge of drafting the bill.

Following its congress last weekend the WP announced it would begin a campaign in Congress for the urgent approval of a bill to “democratize” information and a regulatory framework to impede ‘crossed assets and interests’ that is ‘media monopolies’ that control different forms of media expression.

Bernardo said that the WP proposal does “not preach for the control of the media nor does it attack freedom of the press”.

“What is going on is that we have a controversy with the media; the same way the media can criticize the WP, the WP feels it has the right to criticize the media”, said Bernardo.

The minister also downgraded the rating of the word ‘urgent’ and said the government is working on the regulatory framework to be sent to Congress, which will first undergo a public opinion consultation period, and is specifically referred to electronic communications, broadcasting and television.

Bernardo who has been bombarded in blogs and web sites from WP militants for making a difference between the Executive and the ruling party, recalled that President Dilma Rousseff “strongly stated she defended and protected freedom of the press and freedom of expression and that the Brazilian constitution bans any form of censorship or media content control”.

Bernardo is working on draft legislation based on the European experience and which was first collected and displayed by Franklin Martins, former president Lula da Silva Public Information Secretary.

The Communications minister was strongly supported by the president of the Brazilian Socialist Party, who is also the governor of the state of Pernambuco and belongs to the ruling coalition, Eduardo Campos.

“I will not meddle with the congress of a friendly party, but in the Socialist party the issue is not in the agenda because we are concerned with the economy, exports, health and education. The control of the media is the job of citizens, if I don’t like one of them, I simply do not consume it”, underlined Campos.

The Brazilian press has repeatedly exposed corruption cases involving the ruling coalition and particularly the Workers Party, both under President Lula da Silva and currently with Ms Rousseff.

Contrary to her political mentor who would be furious with the exposures involving his closest aides claiming they were ‘politically motivated’ and ‘good guys’ should be forgiven, Ms Rousseff openly supports and sponsors the approach and in eight months has lost four ministers and several other top officials to corruption claims.
 

Categories: Politics, Brazil.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • GeoffWard2

    Summarizing:

    The Brazilian press - especially Veja - has repeatedly exposed corruption cases involving the ruling coalition and particularly the Workers Party (WP).
    Presidenta Rousseff defends and protects freedom of the press and freedom of expression, saying that the Brazilian constitution bans any form of censorship or media content control; a position supported by the Socialist Party (SP).

    The WP wishes to change the Constitution to stop the media from publishing details of major corruptions within Government and the administration.
    It seeks to pressure Congress to “democratize” information, and to create a regulatory framework to impede ‘crossed assets and interests’ (‘media monopolies’ that control different forms of media expression).

    Bernardo, Dilma’s Minister of Communication, supports the Presidenta, and is trying to take the heat out of the debate, saying that the WP does not preach for the control of the media nor does it attack freedom of the press. He argues that the WP and the media have the right to criticize each other, and says that controls of the media – checks and balances researched by Lula’s own WP - are underway and that change is not urgent.

    . . . . . . . . . .

    Bernardo’s words are political ‘double-speak’, he is seriously at odds with the Workers’ Party (WP).

    The WP created Institutionalized Corruption and don’t want to be publically hoist by their own petard.
    They wish to Carry On Corrupting in private. Their individual personal fortunes depend on this.

    Brasil NEEDS the robust defence of the Ficha Limpa against these vested interests;
    it also needs the defence of this part of Brasil’s Constitution – Free Speech and Free Press - so the people can know and address the corrupt practices of those with the vested interests.

    Sep 09th, 2011 - 03:40 pm 0
  • Forgetit87

    It's not media control. It's a sort of media regulation to distribute ownership and avoid corporate monopoly - something that exists in Europe and Argentina and that would fit Brazil's needs as media in the country is concentrated in the hands of some few rich families which one can count in the fingers of one hand. Mercopress is showing its briefs with its vulgar presentation of the issue.

    And I won't even read Geoff's overly long post. Bet it is ridden with the same empty partisanship and preaching tone of his other posts.

    Sep 09th, 2011 - 04:30 pm 0
  • GeoffWard2

    Read, Forgetit.
    Read and learn.
    Learn about the views of others,
    especially where they might differ from your own.

    In this instance, what people (WP) state as their rationale - breaking up a great media monopoly - may be a proximate reason, but the ultimate (perhaps covert) reason is, in my opinion, the gagging of the validly-critical press.

    Do have another go, and read my #1;
    I feel there is little with which you might fundimentally disagree.

    Sep 09th, 2011 - 06:00 pm 0
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!