Thursday, November 10th 2011 - 06:17 UTC

Uruguay best place to live in Latin America, says Legatum Institute

Uruguay is the best place to live in Latin America according to the Legatum Institute fourth year index on quality of life conditions which ranks 110 countries world wide representing 90% of world population and 97% of the global economy.

The capital Montevideo next to the sea and with plenty of green spaces

According to the latest Prosperty index, Uruguay ranks 29, followed by Chile, 31, Argentina 39 and Brazil, 52. In the whole of the Americas, Uruguay is the only country that figures in the highest ranking with Canada (6) and the US (10).

The rest of South America is ranked medium while Ecuador and Bolivia figure at the lowest level.

The Legatum Institute describes itself as an independent non-partisan public policy group based in London, with research, publications, and programs that advance ideas and policies in support of free and prosperous societies around the world.

The top ten of the Prosperity Index include: Norway, Denmark, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, Canada, Finland, Switzerland, Holland and United States. UK figures in position 13 and Ireland, 12.

The Legatum Prosperity Index is the world’s only global assessment of wealth and wellbeing. Now in its fourth year, the Index analyses 110 nations and starts with a holistic definition of prosperity that includes both material wealth and quality of life, and then employs a rigorous set of estimation methods to determine which factors matter most to nations’ overall prosperity.

Most people would intuitively agree that “prosperity” is not just money but also quality of life. The Prosperity Index is the first global index that provides an empirical basis for this belief. It finds that successful countries enjoy a “virtuous cycle” of economic liberty and growth, political freedom and good governance, and enterprising and happy citizens, which mutually reinforce each other on the path to prosperity.

Rather than replicating other measurements that rank countries by their actual levels of wealth, life satisfaction, or development, the Prosperity Index produces rankings based on the foundations of prosperity. These are the factors that help drive economic growth or produce happy citizens in a given country.
 

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1 Dorian (#) Nov 10th, 2011 - 11:54 am Report abuse
Uruguay, like Switzerland, enjoys its higher standard of living from taking in money from its neighbors and placing it in secret accounts. This money is taken away from health and education budgets. Shame on Uruguay, Switzerland, and all other thieves.
2 Drew Puli Wolf (#) Nov 11th, 2011 - 07:28 pm Report abuse
Just a correction Brazil is number 42 not 52.
3 ChrisR (#) Nov 12th, 2011 - 07:53 pm Report abuse
Dorian #1 Perhaps the reason people from Argentina move their life savings to places like Uruguay, and invest them in normal accounts, has something to do with this:
'The central bank, which habitually buys dollars to build reserves and maintain a stable exchange rate, shifted gears in August to start selling more dollars.
It has spent about $1.7 billion this month to sustain a 7% to 8% annual depreciation of the peso to 4.265 per dollar this week from 3.95 at the start of the year.
The government expects the peso to weaken to an average of 4.4 in 2012, while private economists forecast it will slide to 4.8 to 5.1 per dollar by the end of 2012. The source of this statement, none other than:
** Market News International - Buenos Aires **
Clearly with your lack of grasp of economics you have no real money to save from CFK and her backhanding cronies. Wait until inflation reaches 35% from the present 28% and see what happens then to the 'boom' period you keep harping on about.
4 ManRod (#) Nov 14th, 2011 - 01:15 am Report abuse
Dorian, you can't blame the Uru's for the neighbours not trusting their own financial systems. There are reasons enough to understand this...

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