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Montevideo, September 21st 2018 - 17:49 UTC

Uruguayan cabinet divided over how to address Argentine trade restrictions

Wednesday, February 8th 2012 - 06:21 UTC
Full article 7 comments

The latest round of imports’ restrictions imposed by the government of President Cristina Fernandez and how to address them have triggered a serious debate inside the ministerial cabinet of Uruguayan president Jose Mujica. Read full article

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  • Be serious

    “Astori stated that Argentina’s attitude was ‘imperialist’ ”

    Is that similar to having a “Colonialist” attitude?

    Hmm interesting.

    Feb 08th, 2012 - 04:12 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Pirat-Hunter

    Mujica should be concentrating on trade restrictions to level the playing field rather then wasting Uruguay's budgets on trips and tours, doesn't Mujica know that Argentina and Brazil work with their trade restrictions to level their playing fields?, if Mujica expects Argentina and Brazil to fix Uruguay's flow of goods and services he is in for a generally expected surprise. Mujica is taking dialog quite literally in political terms I was expecting something along the lines similar to a trade restriction of their own.

    Feb 08th, 2012 - 04:38 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ChrisR

    2 Pratt-Junta

    Stunning comment from a cunning stunt! (the Brits will recognise the phrase)

    Protectionist policies never work because of the tit-for-tat principle.

    I live in Uruguay and support many of the things that Pepe does but not his stance in always giving in to the bully.

    Look at the result, we now rely on Argentina as our main supplier and due to the USD Flight laws and the useless, valueless Argie Pesos problem we need to move on.

    We do not need to get locked further in with the bunch of wannabee gangsters who would knife us in the back without thinking.

    Feb 08th, 2012 - 05:18 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Viscount Falkland

    Yep.Uruguay could do alot of trade with the Falklands and the oil business over the coming decades but they have chosen to sleep with the jackals...

    Feb 08th, 2012 - 05:37 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ChrisR

    @4 Only for the moment, hopefully.

    Feb 08th, 2012 - 06:12 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Pirat-Hunter

    #3 funny you mention the brits because i had UK's stand in mind regarding restrictions on food stuff going into the EU namely UK farmers targeting food products from SouthAmerican. I agree with you that Uruguay doesn't need to be among back stavers. but if that is how all of Uruguay feels about Argentina why does Mujica even bother to visit Argentina maybe this article is just another tool to generate tension, whatever the case crying to IMF didn't solve Argentina's financial problems it only made them bigger, modern day protectionism like subsidies for farming, tax exemptions for mining and government grants are generally used in modern economies with some success, it all depends on who you ask, in USA and Canada for example during the past few years Canada made it harder for USA busynesses to access Canadian founded projects while USA under the national security act drafted laws to make it impossible if not illegal to bid on projects if your head office wasn't in USA.

    Feb 08th, 2012 - 11:11 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ChrisR

    6 Pirat-Hunter

    ”I agree with you that Uruguay doesn't need to be among back stav(sic)ers. but if that is how all of Uruguay feels about Argentina why does Mujica even bother to visit Argentina....”
    I also wonder that, he should encourage Uruguayan businesses to obtain their supplies from in-country OR to start businesses with the direct intent of manufacturing those items.

    The sooner we get out of the maw of Argentina the better.

    Feb 09th, 2012 - 01:06 pm - Link - Report abuse 0

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