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Chinese markets recover after Monday's trading suspension; central bank injects funds

Tuesday, January 5th 2016 - 08:57 UTC
Full article 2 comments
Trading in Shanghai was suspended early on Monday under a new rule designed to limit dramatic falls in markets. Trading in Shanghai was suspended early on Monday under a new rule designed to limit dramatic falls in markets.
 The central bank also injected an unexpected 130bn Yuan ($19.94bn) into the market to keep borrowing costs down - in a move to reassure retail investors. The central bank also injected an unexpected 130bn Yuan ($19.94bn) into the market to keep borrowing costs down - in a move to reassure retail investors.

Mainland Chinese shares recovered early losses amid volatile swings, following Monday's suspension of trading which led to a global equities sell-off. The Shanghai Composite was up 0.8% at 3,324.27 after opening more than 3% lower, while the Hang Seng also changed direction to head up 0.1% to 21,342.09.

 Trading in Shanghai was suspended early on Monday under a new rule designed to limit dramatic falls in markets. But regulators said on Tuesday they may restrict stock sales to stem falls.

The China Securities Regulatory Commission said it would consider restricting the proportion of shares that major shareholders could sell during a given period of time. The central bank also injected an unexpected 130bn Yuan ($19.94bn) into the market to keep borrowing costs down - in a move to reassure retail investors.

Analysts said investors were waiting to see if Beijing could stem the latest selling in Chinese stocks and whether more measures would be introduced.

The new “circuit breaker” rule that suspended trading nationwide for the first time on Monday was created after sharp falls last summer and was meant to curb market volatility in China. Monday's 7% fall in China spooked global markets.

Overnight, US benchmark indexes lost up to 2% as concerns grew that the dive in the Chinese stocks was the start of another volatile period after last summer's dramatic market rout.

Escalating tensions in the Middle East on oil prices also dented investors' confidence. Oil prices were flat after rising as much as 4% on the dispute between Saudi Arabia and Iran.

South Korean shares also headed higher after a senior finance ministry official said the government would take action to stabilize the market if needed, following Monday's steep plunge. The Kospi was up 0.8% to 1,933.84 points.

Japan's Nikkei 225 index also recovered losses to head up 0.4% to 18,527.35, but Australia's S&P/ASX 200 bucked the uptrend to lose 1% to 5,216.70.

Categories: Economy, International.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Jack Bauer

    Well BRasshole.
    'all quiet on the western front'....can't say the same about the eastern one...

    Jan 05th, 2016 - 09:35 pm 0
  • yankeeboy

    Someday soon people are going to realize everything the Chin have been saying is a lie.
    I wonder what is taking so long....

    I said long ago the U$3T they supposedly have will not be near enough to fix the mess they have coming..
    not near enough

    I remember arguing on this board with various retards, them claiming China will overtake the USA soon.
    I wonder where they are now...

    Jan 07th, 2016 - 01:41 pm 0
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