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Montevideo, December 15th 2017 - 21:47 UTC

Falklands' second flight to South America addressed at talks in London

Tuesday, December 20th 2016 - 07:43 UTC
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Falklands representatives MLA Summers and MLA Phyl Rendell were part of the UK delegation headed by Foreign Office minister Alan Duncan Falklands representatives MLA Summers and MLA Phyl Rendell were part of the UK delegation headed by Foreign Office minister Alan Duncan
The Argentine delegation had a new leader, Deputy minister Pedro Villagra Delgado, ex ambassador in Australia The Argentine delegation had a new leader, Deputy minister Pedro Villagra Delgado, ex ambassador in Australia

Argentina and the United Kingdom held in London on Monday the first of a two-day round of talks in the framework of the September joint communiqué with the purpose of improving bilateral relations and cooperation, and advancing in one of the few contentious issues, the Falkland Islands' dispute.

 Buenos Aires reports from Argentine sources indicate talks were held in a “very good climate” with the attendance of two Falkland Islands representatives as part of the UK delegation since several issues relative to the Islands were addressed.

In effect last Friday an official release from the Falklands government announced that MLA Mike Summers and MLA Phyl Rendell would be representing the Islands as part of the UK delegation at meetings with the Argentine delegates in London on Monday and Tuesday.

The release made it clear that the the main item to be addressed at the meetings was a second flight from South America to the Falklands, as was agreed in the September Joint Statement between UK and Argentina, and “progress now needs to be made on requesting expressions of interest from qualifying airlines to operate a service”.

Although not mentioned in the release the Falkland Islanders had made it clear that the air link should be to a third country, preferebly Chile or Sao Paulo in Brazil.

“Other items to be considered at the meeting, depending on the time available, may include scientific cooperation over fisheries in the South West Atlantic and shipping activities”, added the Falklands government release.

The Argentine sources report indicate that the four-hour Monday round evolved in a very good climate and followed the road map established in the September joint communiqué, and there were “concerte and practical” advances.

The UK delegation was headed by Foreign Office minister Alan Duncan, who was in Buenos Aires last September, and on the Argentine side Deputy minister Pedro Villagra Delgado, the head of the Malvinas Desk ambassador Maria Teresa Kralikas and ambassador in Geneva Marcelo Cima, among others.

For Deputy minister Villagra Delgado, ex ambassador in Australia, ex consul in London and a career diplomat appointed last week to the post it was his first incursion with the UK/Argentina round of talks. Following minister Susana Malcorra's failed attempt to the UN Secretary General post there were some removals in the Argentine foreign ministry.

 

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  • DemonTree

    @Marc1
    The Islanders object to direct flights because they don't want to be dependent on (an often hostile) Argentina for their air link. Argentina is involved in the talks because they want more flights to the Falklands themselves, and because they have threatened to block flights from third countries in the past, either directly by forbidding them to fly through Argentine airspace, or indirectly by putting pressure on the airlines. So they need to get Argentina's agreement in order to arrange anything.

    Dec 20th, 2016 - 03:07 pm +5
  • James Marshall

    pgerman...I would imagine the Mr Summers will shake the hand of any Argentine public servant if and when the Argentine Government publically recognise the Falklanders, stops claiming his home and the people he represents and acknowledges their right to determine their own future.

    The extremists in this case are the country with a bizarre concept that the Argentine Representative to the Malvinas, Antarctic and South Atlantic Islands actually has legitimacy and the people and government that live there don't. Go figure....

    Dec 20th, 2016 - 06:05 pm +4
  • gordo1

    The majority of the Islanders can trace the presence of their forbears in the Falkland Islands much further back in time than the majority of the citizens of Argentina - with the exception, of course, of the descendants of indigenous residents. What “implanted” Argentine nonsense! ¡Son nabísimos!

    Dec 20th, 2016 - 11:51 am +3
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