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Montevideo, November 19th 2017 - 01:19 UTC

Brazilian tainted meat: minister believes “the worst of the process is over”

Thursday, March 30th 2017 - 09:56 UTC
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Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi insisted the problem is isolated and that Brazilian products represent no danger. Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi insisted the problem is isolated and that Brazilian products represent no danger.
But the economic damage to Latin America’s biggest country could be dire: US$1.5 billion in sales are at risk, Mr Maggi estimated. But the economic damage to Latin America’s biggest country could be dire: US$1.5 billion in sales are at risk, Mr Maggi estimated.

Worldwide markets have been slamming their doors on Brazilian meat since revelations that rotten product was being sold with faked certificates, but the agriculture minister said Thursday “the worst of the process is over.”

 Just a week since police announced they had discovered meatpacking companies bribing corrupt inspectors to certify tainted meat, Brazil’s huge meat industry is reeling as China and other big clients suspend or impose extra checks on imports.

Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi insisted that the problem is isolated and that Brazilian products represent no danger. But the economic damage to Latin America’s biggest country could be dire: US$1.5 billion in sales are at risk, Mr Maggi estimated.

In another sign of the impact, giant food producer JBS announced late Thursday that it was suspending beef production for three days in 33 of its 36 plants, followed by a reduction of production to 35% capacity next week.

“These measures aim to adjust production until the question of the embargoes is resolved,” the company said.

“I think the worst of the process is over,” Mr Maggi said. “All countries are showing goodwill. They understand that with the procedures we have set up over the years, as well as the fact that importers themselves also make checks, they can be sure that our products are good.”

Maggi said Brazil’s challenge is to persuade markets that while “some public servants were corrupt, we’ve never had, not for a moment, accusations that our products are not good quality, especially those for export.”

“We need to separate these two things,” he said.

Mr Maggi said earlier that 5,000 containers are on ships, but that most of the meat products are not under suspicion. He revealed that only one of the plants being investigated had been exporting.

“We have already asked for the return of all the containers that were in transit. There is no risk that a country could receive products sent recently from these 21 plants,” he said.

Like other officials, Maggi showed his frustration at the police. He questioned why the police had not said anything before, given the probe announced last week had been running for two years.

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  • :o))

    Of course, he believes! Isn't it very convenient?

    Mar 31st, 2017 - 02:47 pm 0
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