MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, October 17th 2017 - 16:54 UTC

Dr. Dao incident makes United Airlines chane policy on last minute seats for staff

Monday, April 17th 2017 - 07:39 UTC
Full article 4 comments
Law enforcement officials dragged Dr Dao off a flight departing from Chicago because it was fully booked, and the airline wanted seats for staff members. Law enforcement officials dragged Dr Dao off a flight departing from Chicago because it was fully booked, and the airline wanted seats for staff members.
The 69-year-old physician had refused to leave, saying he needed to go home to see his patients. He was then dragged down the aisle of the aircraft. The 69-year-old physician had refused to leave, saying he needed to go home to see his patients. He was then dragged down the aisle of the aircraft.
His lawyer later said that Dr Dao found the experience “more horrifying and harrowing than what he experienced when leaving Vietnam”. His lawyer later said that Dr Dao found the experience “more horrifying and harrowing than what he experienced when leaving Vietnam”.
The situation escalated when a response from the airline's chief executive, Oscar Muñoz, failed to mention any use of excessive force The situation escalated when a response from the airline's chief executive, Oscar Muñoz, failed to mention any use of excessive force

United Airlines is changing its policy on giving staff last-minute seats on full flights after a man was dragged screaming from an overbooked plane. The airline said that in future crew members would be allocated seats at least an hour before departure.

 The change of policy comes after passenger Dr David Dao lost two front teeth and suffered a broken nose when he was forcibly removed from a flight last Sunday. United Airlines said the move was aimed at improving its customer services.

The incident involving Dr Dao caused outrage and widespread condemnation of the airline after shocking footage was shared and watched by millions of people online. His daughter, Crystal Dao Pepper, later told a news conference in Chicago that the family had been “sickened” by what had happened.

Law enforcement officials dragged Dr Dao off a flight departing from Chicago for Louisville, Kentucky, because it was fully booked, and the airline wanted four passengers to make way for staff members.

The 69-year-old Vietnamese-American physician had refused to leave, saying he needed to go home to see his patients. He was then dragged down the aisle of the aircraft.

His lawyer later said that Dr Dao found the experience “more horrifying and harrowing than what he experienced when leaving Vietnam”. The ordeal led to demonstrations at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport and turned into a public relations disaster for United Airlines.

The situation escalated when a response from the airline's chief executive, Oscar Mu;oz, failed to mention any use of excessive force.

“This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United. I apologise for having to re-accommodate these customers,” he said in a statement. He also said that Dr Dao was “disruptive and belligerent”.

Days later Mr Munoz, who was facing calls to resign from online petitions that had received thousands of signatures, said he felt “shame and embarrassment” and vowed that it would never happen again. The airline offered compensation to all customers on board last Sunday's United Flight 3411.

Categories: Politics, Tourism, United States.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Markič

    The plane was not “overbooked.” Lying, incompetent media.

    United violated their own long-standing regulations and then tried to blame the victim. Most of the media fell for it.

    As noted in the following article “....there is a legal difference between bumping a passenger in the instance of overselling a flight versus bumping a passenger to give priority to another passenger.”

    https://www.inc.com/cynthia-than/the-controversial-united-airlines-flight-was-not-overbooked-and-why-that-matters.html

    The bloodied passenger might not be a saint, but he has inadvertently done a public service by exposing United's practices and the effects of the regulatory climate under the previous Obama regime.

    Apr 17th, 2017 - 11:36 am +1
  • DemonTree

    They weren't bumping him to give priority to another passenger, they were bumping him to give priority to their own crew members who were flying as part of their jobs.

    “according to aviation lawyer Thomas Janson, airline crew needing to get to a destination to work are classified as “must-fly” and are given priority under this regulation.

    “Such a practise is called ‘deadheading’ and it means that flight and cabin crew are given first priority over passengers in the event that they are required to crew a flight,” Mr Janson, National Manager of Transport Law at Shine Lawyers told news.com.au.”

    http://www.news.com.au/travel/world-travel/north-america/us-federal-law-is-responsible-for-the-united-airlines-incident/news-story/fc1b993f925c0b1955468b3b90c1c64e

    The article also says that unlike in the US there are no laws in Australia specifying that passengers must be compensated if they are bumped. Perhaps 'Markič' would prefer that kind of 'regulatory climate'?

    Apr 17th, 2017 - 12:08 pm +1
  • golfcronie

    Consider yourself lucky only a few bruises and a damaged ego. Worth millions I would say, won't have to work again lucky fellow,I don't get that lucky.

    Apr 17th, 2017 - 09:21 am 0
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!