MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, May 27th 2017 - 21:16 UTC

Falklands fisheries: Galicia fleet analyzes impact of Brexit

Wednesday, May 10th 2017 - 08:23 UTC
Full article 19 comments
The Galicia fleet was the first to approach the Falklands and offer a fair deal The Galicia fleet was the first to approach the Falklands and offer a fair deal
March 2019, is the “critical date” for signing the exit treaty, but with no agreement   “tariff and contingent measures will be very harmful for companies”, said Sobrino March 2019, is the “critical date” for signing the exit treaty, but with no agreement “tariff and contingent measures will be very harmful for companies”, said Sobrino

The future of Galician fishing after “Brexit” could generate “very harmful” measures in the field of fish imports from a fisheries that is as wealthy and important for the Galician fleet as that of the Falkland Islands.

 This was pointed out by Jose Manuel Sobrino Heredia, a professor at the University Institute of European Studies Salvador de Madariaga and responsible for producing a report on the effects of the exit of the United Kingdom from the European Union, who believes that the situation of the Islands “perhaps makes it uncompetitive to bring fish from there,” reported Faro de Vigo.

In the framework of the Galicia Maritime Forum (FOGAMA) held in Vigo, Sobrino said that there will be a need to negotiate an agreement or transitional measures to regulate this trade from the Islands and from the United Kingdom, since if by March 2019 - indicated as the “critical date” for signing the exit treaty - it has not been reached, “tariff and contingent measures will be very harmful for companies.”

“The United Kingdom will be a third state,” he stated, adding that “the European institutions are warning” that the British islands will try to ”bilateralize the problems of directly negotiating the issues country-by-country”.

Likewise, the issue of how to settle disputes between the companies and the country was also addressed because at the time of Brexit, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and the world courts (such as the WTO) will not be recognized or be thought to settle contingencies between a company and a state.

Likewise Sobrino explained that ”it is likely that in FAO and in regional fisheries organizations such as NAFO or the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), the UK becomes allied with countries such as Australia, New Zealand or Canada, with which it will gain weight.“

On the other hand, Sobrino recommended not to close to the idea that Brexit is ”a threat“, since in his opinion ”opportunities are generated“, and recalled that the main ”weapon“ is to have the ”market“.

”They are interested in having an agreement with us like the one that Greenland has with the EU“, since the United Kingdom ”needs to sell us fish and that is our asset,” he concluded. (FIS).

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Pugol-H

    “recalled that the main ”weapon“ is to have the ”market“.

    “needs to sell us fish and that is our asset,”

    What galaxy is he living in?????

    That the Galician fishing fleet will be hit by tariffs, making it difficult for them, has no effect on selling licences to boats of other nationality.

    Plenty more fishing boats in the sea where fishing is concerned. Ha Ha.

    @Pete Bog
    There is no “bill” to pay, even the EU’s own lawyers have told them that.

    The fact they still try and pretend there is, does indicate a level of desperation on their part.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05/06/100bn-brexit-bill-legally-impossible-enforce-european-commissions/

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05/06/100bn-brexit-bill-legally-impossible-enforce-european-commissions/

    May 10th, 2017 - 02:02 pm +3
  • Pete Bog

    Ahhh the penny has finally dropped.

    Spain like the EU thinks it has got the UK over a barrel.

    Not so.

    This is why it might not be sensible for Scotland to remain in the EU-they might want to ask their fishermen that went out of business first.

    @gordo1
    “What about an arrangement such as Spain withdraws all its nonsensical claims to sovereignty of Gibraltar and the Falkland Islands allows the Spaniards to continue to fish in their waters?”

    Unless I got this wrong, Spain also fish a lot in UK waters.

    If we are going to be charged a massive exit fee from the EU, at the least we should pile on tariffs for EU fishermen to fish in our waters to get the exit fees back.

    May 10th, 2017 - 11:05 am +2
  • gordo1

    What about an arrangement such as Spain withdraws all its nonsensical claims to sovereignty of Gibraltar and the Falkland Islands allows the Spaniards to continue to fish in their waters?

    May 10th, 2017 - 08:46 am +1
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!