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Montevideo, October 19th 2017 - 01:50 UTC

Five days countdown for Catalonia as Spain readies an impressive national unity day celebration

Thursday, October 12th 2017 - 11:39 UTC
Full article 10 comments

Spain is preparing to celebrate its National Day, 12th October, amid a continuing political crisis sparked by Catalonia's disputed independence referendum. The public display of unity comes a day after PM Mariano Rajoy told parliament the country was facing the most serious threat to its 40-year-old democracy. Read full article

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  • Voice

    “The European Union has said that, should Catalonia split from Spain, the region would cease to be part of the bloc.”

    This is exactly the same stance the EU would have taken with Scotland before Brexit if we had voted for Independence...
    The EU seeks to threaten and blackmail under the guise of a democratic Union, what difference does it make if they have an extra republic instead of a fascist overlord...

    Posted 6 days ago - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Marti Llazo

    I never thought I might end up agreeing with Voice but his characterisation of Spain as a fascist overlord is accurate, if somewhat charitable.

    The EU has acted shamefully, yet again.

    Posted 6 days ago - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @Voice
    It's not so surprising they would say that. The EU is a club of countries, none of them want to encourage their own separatist regions.

    I wonder what Puigdemont will do. It seems a bit dodgy to declare independence when over half the people didn't vote. How do we know what they want?

    Posted 6 days ago - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Clyde15

    I think the EU is showing its true colours now. Rigid and dogmatic.

    Posted 6 days ago - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Pete Bog

    Whatever the divorce bill, there will be a point where the British money river will dry up and the EUSSR will be hard pushed to find a new recruit with a positive balance of money to replace the UK.

    Posted 6 days ago - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    They won't be getting a rich new recruit, they'll just have to spend less or make everyone else pay more. I'm sure that will be popular.

    Posted 6 days ago - Link - Report abuse 0
  • EscoSesDoidao

    O Voice, - ''This is exactly the same stance the EU would have taken with Scotland before Brexit if we had voted for Independence...''

    LMFAO, what a moronic statement.

    Posted 5 days ago - Link - Report abuse -1
  • Rufus

    @DemonTree “when over half the people didn't vote. How do we know what they want?”

    Presumably they want to not risk being brutalized by the Guardia Civil.


    Has anyone else noticed that those countries that have holidays for national unity tend to be those countries who really don't have any?

    Posted 5 days ago - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Voice

    EscoSesDoidao

    Moronic Statement...?
    Have you seen any evidence of the EU welcoming a disruption of unity amongst EU members...?
    Oh I see...you think Scotland would have been the exception to the rule...
    Still living in your nationalist dreamworld...

    Posted 5 days ago - Link - Report abuse -1
  • DemonTree

    @Rufus
    Who is more likely to risk being brutalised by the Guardia Civil? A committed Catalan independence supporter, someone who is opposed to independence, or someone who isn't sure? Even without the threat of violence, who is more likely to vote in a referendum that has been declared illegal by the Spanish Constitutional Court? A Catalan independence supporter, someone who is opposed to independence, or someone who isn't sure?

    With less than half the population voting, there's not enough information to go on, and polls beforehand showed only 40% support for independence.

    Also, the UK doesn't have a national holiday at all, it's a shame.

    @Voice
    It's not even a speculation; the EU DID take the same stance with Scotland, both before and after Brexit. If a region becomes independent it is automatically out of the EU and must reapply for membership as a new state.

    The difference after Brexit was how sympathetic and helpful they might be about expediting Scotland's application vs leaving them at the back of the queue. For Catalonia, it's hard to believe that Spain would not just veto their application to join, so they'd be kinda screwed.

    Posted 5 days ago - Link - Report abuse 0

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