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Montevideo, November 22nd 2017 - 09:14 UTC

Xi reaffirms his grip on China and his approval is an encouragement “that will spur me on.”

Thursday, October 26th 2017 - 02:47 UTC
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Xi was given a renewed mandate following the first meeting Wednesday of the new Central Committee that was elected at the party's twice-a-decade national congress. Xi was given a renewed mandate following the first meeting Wednesday of the new Central Committee that was elected at the party's twice-a-decade national congress.

Chinese President Xi Jinping on Wednesday unveiled the new lineup of the ruling Communist Party highest body, whose members will rule alongside him as he embarks on a second five-year term as party leader with an agenda to spread prosperity and expand the global influence of the world's second largest economy.

 As expected, Xi was given a renewed mandate following the first meeting Wednesday of the new Central Committee that was elected at the party's twice-a-decade national congress.

The party had already elevated Xi's status on Tuesday at its closing session by inserting his name and dogma into the party's constitution alongside past leaders Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping, cementing his status as the most powerful man to head the country in decades.

That move effectively makes any act of opposing him tantamount to an attack on the party itself, largely insulating him from competition among the party's rival factions.

Xi said his return as general secretary constituted “not just approval of my work but also encouragement that will spur me on.”

“In this new context, we must get a new look and more importantly, make new accomplishments,” he said in comments to reporters at a brief ceremony at the Great Hall of the People to introduce the new seven-strong Politburo Standing Committee, five of whose members were newly appointed on Wednesday.

The only other returning member was Premier Li Keqiang, the party's second-ranking official primarily responsible for overseeing the economy and leading the Cabinet. Li's authority was widely viewed as having been undercut by Xi's accumulation of power over all sectors of government, although his continuing presence on the committee appears to speak to the high-regard in which he is held within the party.

The makeup of the committee reflects Xi's efforts to foster party unity by striking a balance between different interest groups in the 89-million member organization as he seeks to better position a reinvigorated party to dominate China's affairs at home and abroad.

They will assume responsibility for running the rubber-stamp legislature, the National People's Congress and its advisory body, the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, and assume a range of portfolios, including those responsible for propaganda, party discipline, ethnic and Taiwan affairs and science and technology.

The other members are, in order of seniority: Li Zhanshu, director of the party's General Office who serves as Xi's chief of staff; Vice Premier Wang Yang; Wang Huning, director of the party's Central Policy Research Office; Zhao Leji, head of the Central Organization Department responsible for job assignments; and Shanghai party leader Han Zheng, a veteran manager of the country's financial hub.

Zhao is expected to head the much-feared corruption watchdog body, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection.

Xi has made his wide-ranging anti-corruption campaign the hallmark of his first five years in office. While popular among ordinary Chinese, it is seen as part of a drive to purge his rivals and political opponents and boost supervision over the party at all levels.

Alongside the campaign, Xi has overseen one of the harshest crackdowns on civil society aimed at squelching dissent and activism among lawyers and rights advocates.

Categories: Politics, International.

Top Comments

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  • The Voice

    A good thing for the Chinese people and the world. China is a powder keg and if the lid ever comes off watch out. What is essential for China is continuity and an iron grip. The middle east is a side show compared with what could happen in China if it disintegrates.

    Oct 26th, 2017 - 10:19 am 0
  • DemonTree

    I don't disagree with the last bit, but dictatorships have their own big problems and Xi is well on the way to concentrating all the power in his own hands. I think it's worrying that China is moving towards being less free at the same time they are becoming richer and more powerful. It would be much better for them to have a smooth transition to democracy than potentially overthrowing their government when it can no longer deliver enough growth, or being even more repressed and stuck with an incompetent leadership that lets the country slip backwards.

    Oct 26th, 2017 - 03:25 pm 0
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