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Montevideo, November 19th 2017 - 03:21 UTC

No end to violent deaths in Brazil: seven people killed every sixty minutes in 2016

Friday, November 10th 2017 - 00:50 UTC
Full article 4 comments
The average annual rate for violent deaths in Brazil is 29.9 murders per 100,000 inhabitants. The average annual rate for violent deaths in Brazil is 29.9 murders per 100,000 inhabitants.
“Violence has spread throughout the whole country. It isn't limited to the bigger states or to an only region,” said the forum's President, Renato Sérgio de Lima. “Violence has spread throughout the whole country. It isn't limited to the bigger states or to an only region,” said the forum's President, Renato Sérgio de Lima.

The number of violent deaths registered during 2016 in Brazil reached 61,600, a 4.7% increase compared to the previous year. This works out to seven people murdered per hour, on average, throughout the country, according to data from the Brazilian Forum on Public Safety released this week.

 The data is compiled by the forum, an organization that is composed of specialists from the area and is based upon information supplied by public safety and security offices and police forces from the different states of Brazil.

The average annual rate for violent deaths in Brazil is 29.9 murders per 100,000 inhabitants.

The criteria for violent deaths was determined by the entity in order standardize information from the different states and includes homicides, robberies resulting in death, bodily injury followed by death and deaths resulting from police action.

“Violence has spread throughout the whole country. It isn't limited to the bigger states or to an only region,” said the forum's President, Renato Sérgio de Lima.

The record number of deaths was registered against the backdrop of a severe economic situation. There has been a significant reduction in investments in public safety and security by the Federal Government, States and Municipalities.

The total amount spent on the area in 2016 was R$ 81 billion (US$ 24.6 billion), a decrease of 3% compared to 2015.

Collateral effects of the public safety and security scenario are confrontations and deaths involving the police. The number of people killed during police operations reached the highest number ever recorded by the entity: 4,224 cases, an increase of 27% compared to 2015.

The number of civil and military police who were homicide victims themselves also increased considerably.

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  • Jack Bauer

    With the reduction in investment in public safety, a tendency that has been going on for years in most of Brazil - with a few isolated exceptions - the criminals feel safer and bolder to increase their level of activity, which results in more deaths. In Rio, the battle between government and organized crime is being won by the latter.

    Nov 10th, 2017 - 05:03 pm 0
  • :o))

    @JB

    Reduction in the investment in Public-Safety is INTENTIONAL.

    After all, in the slum areas [& at times, elsewhere too], while the Organized Crime controls all kinds of Trade & Transactions; the Drug-Lords “look after” the ELITE-Parasites.

    Weren't they able tell the well-armed troops [10'000 of them] literally to go f*ck themselves; kicking them out of RJ? This Was Yet Another Classic Case of EXCHANGE of FAVORS! In other words; there is NO “battle” but a “partnership” between ALL kinds of parasites.

    Nov 10th, 2017 - 10:11 pm 0
  • Jack Bauer

    @:o))
    The “occupation” of Rio by the armed forces was just for show....instead of using them in what they were trained for, the government has them checking ID's at the entrances of the slums, while the sale of drugs and the daily shootouts carry on under their noses....not to mention that the criminals enter and leave the slum by paths that are left open. Instead of entering the slums and cleaning out the criminals, instead of going after the money trail - closing down bank acounts and confiscating organized crime funds - the government puts on a show to fool the people into believeing they are safe.

    Nov 11th, 2017 - 07:45 pm 0
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