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Montevideo, July 18th 2018 - 08:28 UTC

Breakthrough in Brexit negotiations; Juncker calls it a compromise

Friday, December 8th 2017 - 21:13 UTC
Full article 4 comments
“Prime Minister May has assured me that it has the backing of the UK government. On that basis, I believe we have now made the breakthrough” Juncker said “Prime Minister May has assured me that it has the backing of the UK government. On that basis, I believe we have now made the breakthrough” Juncker said
Theresa May said she expected a formal agreement to be approved at the summit, which begins on Dec. 14. Theresa May said she expected a formal agreement to be approved at the summit, which begins on Dec. 14.

The European Commission said on Friday enough progress had been made in Brexit negotiations with Britain to allow a second phase of talks on future relations to begin, ending an impasse over the status of the Irish border.

 The Commission gave its verdict in a statement after intense talks, which resulted in British Prime Minister Theresa May taking an early-morning flight to Brussels to announce the deal alongside Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

The Commission’s recommendation that sufficient progress has been made will now go to the European Union summit of leaders taking place next week.

“Prime Minister May has assured me that it has the backing of the UK government. On that basis, I believe we have now made the breakthrough we need. Today’s result is of course a compromise,” Juncker told a hastily-arranged news conference.

May said she expected a formal agreement to be approved at the summit, which begins on Dec. 14.

“I also look forward to next week’s European Council meeting, where I hope and expect we will be able to get the endorsement of the 27 (member countries) to what is a hard-won agreement in all our interests,” May said.

The commission said it was ready to begin work immediately on phase two talks, which cover a transitional exit period, trade and long-term relations with the bloc.

Moving to talks about trade and a Brexit transition is crucial for the future of May’s premiership, and to keep trade flowing between the world’s biggest trading bloc and its sixth- largest national economy after Britain leaves on March 30, 2019.

May’s key parliamentary ally in Northern Ireland gave a cautious endorsement of the new terms, four days after 11th-hour objections from Belfast scuppered May’s attempt to sign off on an accord over the Irish border during a lunch in Brussels on Monday.

Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney said the border agreement meant there was no way Brexit could lead to a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland - what will become the only land frontier between Britain and the EU after Brexit.

“Very good outcome for everyone on the island of Ireland - no Hard Border guaranteed!,” Coveney said on Twitter.

Categories: Economy, Politics, International.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • The Voice

    Indy? Wee Jimmy is a busted flush, the majority rules.

    Dec 09th, 2017 - 12:17 pm +2
  • EscoSesDoidao

    Cool. So no more BS about hard borders between Scotland and England after Indy.

    Dec 09th, 2017 - 12:06 pm 0
  • Terence Hill

    Maybe the EU got wind of the fact that the UK however unlikely could jettison NI. Thereby, cutting the Gordian Knot and leaving the EU, NI and Eire to solve their problem. While the UK would have been exculpatory free of having to resolve sweet Fanny Adam.

    Dec 09th, 2017 - 11:53 pm 0
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