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Montevideo, May 25th 2018 - 22:45 UTC

”Falklands (UK)” reference in Heineken H41 beer bottles condemned in Argentine social networks

Wednesday, April 25th 2018 - 08:39 UTC
Full article 70 comments
The H41 was first launched in Holland last year and later in Italy with the target of expanding to other European and Asian countries.   The H41 was first launched in Holland last year and later in Italy with the target of expanding to other European and Asian countries.
H41 with its label of a South American map referring to the Malvinas as Falklands and pointing out they belong to UK H41 with its label of a South American map referring to the Malvinas as Falklands and pointing out they belong to UK

Heineken brewery has been caught red handed with one of its beers' label referring to the disputed South Atlantic islands as “Falklands” and in brackets saying they belong to the United Kingdom, despite the fact the Dutch company is using Patagonian yeast.

Although the H41 beer is distributed in Europe and Asia, an Argentine tourist apparently came across an H41 with its label of a South American map referring to the Malvinas as Falklands and pointing out they belong to UK, and it immediately became a viral success in the social networks according to the Buenos Aires media..

“This is a very serious mistake, error, almost an affront” points out the message recalling that Heineken has a ten year exclusive license to produce Patagonian yeast. The H41 was first launched in Holland last year and later in Italy with the target of expanding to other European and Asian countries.

Apparently the controversial beer also known as “Wild Lager” is traded in barrels (draft) and in small bottles, and belongs to a limited edition elaborated with a special yeast discovered in Argentine Patagonia.

The name H41 refers to the coordinates of the beech forest in Patagonia where the special yeast discovery occurred originally, and which is used in the elaboration of 95% of industrial beers in the world, underlines the Buenos Aires media.

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  • James Marshall

    'Heineken brewery has been caught red handed '...only if you are Argentinian, the rest of the the world doesn't care.......where was this beer sold again......

    Hmmm Dutch company, that is in Europe isn't it. So a European non latin based country should use the name 'Malvinas' and refer to them as Argentine.....Only in your dreams, Jog on half wits, you are just embarrassing yourselves

    Apr 25th, 2018 - 12:39 pm +6
  • Roger Lorton

    Île Falkland? The French do so love the old names :-)

    https://falklandstimeline.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/1748-anson-map-in-gallagher-1964.jpg

    While I Think about it, this from Clayton's remarks to the Royal Society in January, 1776 regarding Falkland's Isle and the harbour of Port Egmont.

    “Falkland's Islands, or, as the Spaniards and French call them, the Malonie (sic) Islands, are situated between the latitude of 52° 26 and 51° 6 S. they are numberless, forming a mass of broken high lands, or very low sedgy keys and sunken rocks. The largest is the easternmost island, and on the eastern side the Spaniards had a settlement, which the Crown of Spain purchased of M. Bougainville, who on his private account, had formed a settlement in the year 1764,...

    Adjoining to the second large island, to the westward, lies Saunders Island, on which the English settlement was made, a blockhouse erected, several spots inclosed for gardens and three storehouses, and five dwelling-houses or huts, built at different times by the ships crews who were stationed there.

    The harbour of Port Egmont was formed by these islands, and another high, barren, rocky island, named Kepple's Island, and some lesser islands to the N.E. And eastward, and was entirely land-locked, or inclosed by the land on every point; it was very spacious; the bottom was muddy and good holding ground. From the hills through the bogs drained several runs of water, and as the landing-places were good, and a natural small cove for boats to lie in safety on the north side of Saunders Island, sheltered from the S.W. Winds, it induced Captain Macbride to make settlement on it. …”

    So, contrary to Groussac's 1910 theory, rather more than just Saunders Island was delivered up in 1771.

    Apr 25th, 2018 - 10:55 pm +6
  • The Voice

    Yuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuup!!!!!!!!

    Bahahahahahahaha

    Heineken refreshes the parts that other beers cannot reach!

    The Malvinas is actually spelt Falklands… ;-))))))))))))))))))

    Chuckle chuckle

    Apr 25th, 2018 - 01:48 pm +5
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