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Montevideo, September 19th 2018 - 03:25 UTC

Brazil's labor minister suspended by the Supreme Court on fraud investigation

Friday, July 6th 2018 - 10:37 UTC
Full article 5 comments
Yomura's removal is another blow to President Temer's administration, which has already seen several ministers resign amid scandal Yomura's removal is another blow to President Temer's administration, which has already seen several ministers resign amid scandal

Brazil's labor minister was suspended Thursday by a Supreme Court justice as part of an investigation into fraud. Helton Yomura cannot enter the Labor Ministry's offices or have contact with its staff, said Joana Dantas, a ministry press officer.

 Yomura's removal is another blow to President Michel Temer's administration, which has already seen several ministers resign amid scandal. Temer himself has faced allegations of corruption twice, but Congress voted both times to spare him a trial while he remains in office. He denies wrongdoing.

Late Thursday, Temer appointed his close ally Eliseu Padilha to serve as interim labor minister, according to the official government gazette. Padilha will continue serve as chief of staff.

In Thursday's operation, federal prosecutors allege that civil servants and lawmakers manipulated the registration procedure for unions. In all, police were executing 10 search warrants and three arrest warrants but would not say who they were for.

Yomura denied any wrongdoing. “Minister Helton Yomura, even without knowing what acts he is accused of, vehemently denies any accusation of a crime or irregularity,” his defense team said in a statement.

Police also searched the offices of federal deputy Nelson Marquezelli. He later stated he had “nothing to fear”. Adding “I will await their report,” he said.

Categories: Politics, Brazil.

Top Comments

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  • Patrick Edgar

    It truly is notable how nearly ONLY the politicians who where not “butt kissers” of the English centrist world financial centers of international monopolies and multinationals, who fought for industrial and economic sovereignty, leftists, socialists, anti “American lead economic globalization” and so forth ... are the ones getting in trouble “with the law”. It seems also no one wants to make a story on that, certainly not MercoPress who relishes seeing how one by one, the countries of South America manage having those leaders they consider worthy of its cover picture make it to the top, whether they are part of Mercosur or not.

    Jul 07th, 2018 - 08:09 am 0
  • DemonTree

    I don't know anything about the guy, but since he was appointed by Temer it's highly unlikely he's a leftist, socialist, or against globalisation and multinationals.

    Besides you know, it's just the opposite in Venezuela. There it's the pro-US politicians in trouble with the law. When is Trump going to invade?

    Jul 07th, 2018 - 12:05 pm 0
  • :o))

    How the electronic ballot used in elections works
    [with ample loopholes to buy votes?]:
    https://link.estadao.com.br/noticias/cultura-digital,entenda-como-funciona-a-urna-eletronica-usada-nas-eleicoes-no-brasil,70002351986

    Jul 08th, 2018 - 01:01 pm 0
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