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Montevideo, October 22nd 2018 - 06:18 UTC

Construction executives confirm bribe payments in exchange for contracts under Kirchner governments

Tuesday, August 7th 2018 - 07:01 UTC
Full article 24 comments
Angelo Calcaterra and cousin of president Macri is the latest executive to speak with prosecutors in the case of the corruption notebooks Angelo Calcaterra and cousin of president Macri is the latest executive to speak with prosecutors in the case of the corruption notebooks
Journalist Diego Cabot wrote that he made copies of the notebooks he received last October and then gave them to prosecutors in April Journalist Diego Cabot wrote that he made copies of the notebooks he received last October and then gave them to prosecutors in April
Prosecutor Carlos Stornelli is probing what he calls the “criminal conspiracy to illegally raise money” outlined in the notebooks Prosecutor Carlos Stornelli is probing what he calls the “criminal conspiracy to illegally raise money” outlined in the notebooks

Argentine prosecutors questioned a construction executive related to President Mauricio Macri on Monday as part of a sprawling investigation into bribe payments made to the former government. Angelo Calcaterra, the former head of construction company Iecsa and Macri’s cousin, told prosecutors he was told by officials in former President Cristina Fernandez’ administration to pay cash in exchange for public works contracts.

 Calcaterra is the latest executive to speak with prosecutors in the case since last Wednesday, when newspaper La Nacion published contents of notebooks kept by a driver in the former administration that detail how he transported bribe money from construction companies to government officials from 2005-2015.

Journalist Diego Cabot wrote in La Nacion over the weekend that he was given the notebooks in January by Jorge Bacigalupo, an acquaintance of the driver, Oscar Centeno. In a video interview with Cabot posted on La Nacion’s website, Bacigalupo said Centeno gave him the notebooks in September or October.

Cabot wrote that he made copies of the notebooks and then gave them to prosecutors in April. La Nacion decided not to publish the story until law enforcement acted on the information, he added.

Prosecutor Carlos Stornelli is probing what he calls the “criminal conspiracy to illegally raise money” outlined in the notebooks. “They hold an abundance of data and provide a kind of x-ray of the system,” Stornelli told local radio.

More than a dozen former government officials and business executives have been arrested since Wednesday, according to local media reports. Executives for some of the companies named, including Electroingenieria SA and Albanesi SA, have taken leaves of absence, according to securities filings.

On Monday Techint, one of the country’s top conglomerates, said in a statement that it had answered questions from prosecutors and would continue cooperating after its offices were raided last week. It also promised an internal probe.

Ratings agency Moody’s said in a statement that the “corruption scandal is credit negative for Argentine corporations.” It cited “bribery investigations that led to the arrest of senior Argentine business leaders.”

The scandal threatens to complicate a possible presidential campaign next year by Cristina Fernandez, who has been indicted in other graft cases but enjoys immunity from arrest as a senator.

Categories: Politics, Argentina.

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  • Chicureo

    Enrique

    It sincerely breaks my heart that your dear Cristina may be taking an ignominious trip to prison, instead than a glorious return the Casa Rosada. And it is all thanks to the ex-wife of a driver at a government ministry thirsting for revenge.
    ...The scandal is better than watching any Argentine telenovela...

    Aug 07th, 2018 - 08:07 pm +4
  • falklandlad

    The net is set, get ready to sweep. Harvest in sight!

    Aug 07th, 2018 - 11:59 am +3
  • DemonTree

    “the only opposition leader with chances in the October 2019 election.”

    Now what makes you think that? Wasn't Macri's win over Scioli pretty damn close last time? And Macri is a lot less popular now.

    People aren't just going to forget that they weren't happy with CFK's government, even if they believe Macri turned out worse. I would have thought someone new, if they could get the backing of a decent sector of the Peronists, would have more chance.

    Aug 07th, 2018 - 08:33 pm +1
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