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Montevideo, January 16th 2019 - 08:09 UTC

Gatwick Airport admits insufficient technology to prevent future drone disruptions

Saturday, December 22nd 2018 - 05:46 UTC
Full article
 Gatwick Operating Officer Chris Woodroofe said there is currently no commercially available equipment he could put in place to neutralize the threat Gatwick Operating Officer Chris Woodroofe said there is currently no commercially available equipment he could put in place to neutralize the threat
”It’s a criminal act, deliberate act,” he said. “This is an unprecedented issue. This isn’t a Gatwick Airport issue. It’s not even a UK issue. It’s an international issue.” ”It’s a criminal act, deliberate act,” he said. “This is an unprecedented issue. This isn’t a Gatwick Airport issue. It’s not even a UK issue. It’s an international issue.”
The runway reopened on Friday morning having been shut for some 36 hours after multiple drone sightings inside its perimeter, while the investigation is ongoing The runway reopened on Friday morning having been shut for some 36 hours after multiple drone sightings inside its perimeter, while the investigation is ongoing

The boss of London's Gatwick Airport has refused to rule out the possibility of future drone disruption once the military leave. Gatwick chief operating officer Chris Woodroofe said there is currently no commercially available equipment he could put in place to neutralize the threat.

 Speaking outside the airport on Friday, he apologized to passengers and said he hopes flights will be operating normally by Saturday.

“It’s a criminal act, deliberate act,” he said. “This is an unprecedented issue. This isn’t a Gatwick Airport issue. It’s not even a UK issue. It’s an international issue.”

The runway reopened on Friday morning having been shut for around 36 hours after multiple drone sightings inside its perimeter, while the police investigation is ongoing.

“What we need to be doing going forward is work with technology providers and with the Government to enhance our ability to address the risk posed by drones to airports,” said Mr Woodroofe.

“We have been working with technology providers ourselves for the last 12 months but stood here today, there is no commercially available airport licensed proven technology that I could implement.”

Asked if there is anything in place to stop this happening again once the military leave, he said: “My number one priority is going to be the safety of our passengers. And so, if the drone comes and endangers an aircraft then we will suspend runway operations because safety is the number one priority.”

Mr Woodroofe said the airport was operating at almost normal runway conditions on Friday, although airlines were still dealing with the fallout from the disruption.

“Last night working with a number of government agencies and the military we were able to put in place a number of additional mitigating actions which gave me the confidence to re-open Gatwick Airport this morning”.

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