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Montevideo, January 16th 2019 - 08:09 UTC

March of torches in Argentine cities to protest soaring costs of public services

Friday, January 11th 2019 - 08:34 UTC
Full article 5 comments
Weekly demonstrations are planned through early February in Argentina's main cities Weekly demonstrations are planned through early February in Argentina's main cities
During the eight years of Macri's predecessor, ex president Cristina Fernandez rates were virtually frozen as well as transport tickets. During the eight years of Macri's predecessor, ex president Cristina Fernandez rates were virtually frozen as well as transport tickets.
Macri slashed subsidies for public utilities to reduce the country's chronic fiscal deficit, pushing electricity and gas rates up to 2,000% since the start of his term Macri slashed subsidies for public utilities to reduce the country's chronic fiscal deficit, pushing electricity and gas rates up to 2,000% since the start of his term

Tens of thousands of Argentines marched through Buenos Aires on Thursday evening carrying torches, in the first of a series of planned protests against President Mauricio Macri's austerity program and the soaring cost of public services.

Macri slashed subsidies for public utilities and other services to reduce the country's chronic fiscal deficit, pushing electricity and gas rates up to 2,000% since the start of his term, according to estimates by local media.

Rates are expected to increase even more this year. During the eight years of Macri's predecessor, ex president Cristina Fernandez rates were virtually frozen as well as transport tickets.
“People can't make ends meet. All the measures taken by the government go against workers,” Pablo Moyano, leader of the powerful union of truck drivers, and one of the organizers of the protest.

Weekly demonstrations are planned through early February in Argentina's main cities, increasing pressure on Macri to solve the country's economic crisis ahead of a presidential election late this year.

Last year, when the economy contracted, inflation neared 50% and the peso lost close to 50% of its value, Macri reached an unpopular deal with the IMF for a US$57 billion lifeline in exchange for a commitment to cut the deficit.

The protesters in the capital Buenos Aires on Thursday, who witnesses estimated numbered at least 20,000, carried effigies of Macri and signs that read “Enough of the Macri/IMF austerity program” as they marched past the city's obelisk monument toward Congress.

Moyano's teamsters union and a federation of workers' unions, and warming up to ex president Cristina Fernandez planned comeback, organized the protests. Members of leftist political parties and independent Argentines have also joined in.

Macri slashed subsidies for public utilities and other services to reduce the country's chronic fiscal deficit, pushing electricity and gas rates up to 2,000% since the start of his term, according to estimates by local media.

Rates are expected to increase even more this year. During the eight years of Macri's predecessor, ex president Cristina Fernandez rates were virtually frozen as well as transport tickets.
“People can't make ends meet. All the measures taken by the government go against workers,” Pablo Moyano, leader of the powerful union of truck drivers, and one of the organizers of the protest.

Weekly demonstrations are planned through early February in Argentina's main cities, increasing pressure on Macri to solve the country's economic crisis ahead of a presidential election late this year.

Last year, when the economy contracted, inflation neared 50% and the peso lost close to 50% of its value, Macri reached an unpopular deal with the IMF for a US$57 billion lifeline in exchange for a commitment to cut the deficit.

The protesters in the capital Buenos Aires on Thursday, who witnesses estimated numbered at least 20,000, carried effigies of Macri and signs that read “Enough of the Macri/IMF austerity program” as they marched past the city's obelisk monument toward Congress.

Moyano's teamsters union and a federation of workers' unions, and warming up to ex president Cristina Fernandez planned comeback, organized the protests. Members of leftist political parties and independent Argentines have also joined in.

Categories: Economy, Politics, Argentina.

Top Comments

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  • Enrique Massot

    Mauricio Macri and his strategic planner Duran Barba's plans included not only the obliteration of Peronism but the forced acceptance of a stark reduction of Argentines' living conditions.

    Three years later, all the economic problems that the electoral alliance Cambiemos blamed on the government of Cristina Fernandez have exponentially grown, forcing a number of citizens to the streets to protest.

    And once more, the Argentines demonstrate that no one can fool all the Argentines all the time.

    Tic toc, Mauricio.

    Prior

    Posted 4 days ago 0
  • Zaphod Beeblebrox

    “And once more, the Argentines demonstrate that no one can fool all the Argentines all the time. Tic toc, Mauricio.”

    And yet Macri remains marginally more popular than CFK:
    http://en.mercopress.com/2019/01/10/macri-and-cristina-fernandez-polarize-political-scenario-but-a-moderate-opposition-figure-is-emerging

    Posted 4 days ago 0
  • Enrique Massot

    ZB

    Not having the nerve to comment on news about the economy, ineffable Zaphod chooses to fight on the hill of the opinion polls:

    “And yet Macri remains marginally more popular than CFK,” he rejoices.

    For sure, some polls put Macri slightly ahead of Cristina. Others give the advantage to the former president. Yes, the opposition is having a hard time coming together. A sizable amount of Peronist province governors and legislators are still collaborating with the Macri government.

    The common citizen does not have such hesitations. They know exactly what they can buy with their monthly wages if they still have a job or if they are retirees. They've been demonstrating this week in Buenos Aires and provinces against steep energy services hikes announced late December. But Zaphod is saying nothing about it. He is looking at opinion polls. Some of them.

    Posted 3 days ago 0
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