MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, October 20th 2018 - 07:16 UTC

Tag: European Space Agency's (Esa)

  • Thursday, May 10th 2018 - 07:28 UTC

    Falklands caught in the post Brexit Galileo space controversy

    Michael Barnier, Brussels chief Brexit negotiator, triggered the controversy when he argued UK companies should be excluded from the Galileo project

    United Kingdom ministers are unilaterally considering stopping EU access to the Galileo satellite earth station in the Falklands and Ascension, according to reports in the UK press. The move comes after Brussels chief Brexit negotiator, Michael Barnier, stated that UK companies would have to be excluded from the development of sensitive Galileo infrastructure following Brexit due to security concerns.

  • Thursday, July 6th 2017 - 19:29 UTC

    The plight of Ascension Island residents cut off from the Falklands' Airbridge

    The island, which covers around 45 square miles just south of the equator, is formed by around 40 volcanic peaks.

    Ascension Island, home to around 800 people, is even more cut off than it used to be after weekly flights linking the island to the UK were stopped - due to a dodgy runway and the wrong kind of RAF aircraft, according to a BBC report. The British overseas territory is the tip of an old volcano in the Atlantic Ocean, mid-way between Africa and Brazil. It's so remote, that when the Portuguese discovered it on Ascension Day in 1501, they didn't even bother colonizing it.

  • Thursday, July 6th 2017 - 04:07 UTC

    Antarctica Larsen C ice shelf about to spawn huge berg. In pieces it could reach as far as Falklands

    While waiting for Sentinel-1 to record when this 6000 sq km iceberg is spawned, CryoSat can reveal what the berg’s measurements will be.

    Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf deep crack continues to cut across the ice, leaving a huge chunk clinging on. When it eventually gives way, one of the largest icebergs on record will be set adrift, and whole or in pieces, ocean currents could drag it north, even as far as the Falkland Islands. And if so it could pose a hazard for ships in Drake Passage.

  • Tuesday, November 12th 2013 - 08:02 UTC

    European satellite plunges into the Atlantic south of the Falkland Islands

    Goce, the first Esa mission to make an uncontrolled re-entry in more than 25 years. The gravity mapping probe's plunge was inevitable once it ran out of fuel

    European Space Agency's (Esa) Goce satellite has re-entered the Earth's atmosphere, burning up in the process. US tracking data suggests any surviving debris fell into the South Atlantic, just off the tip of South America, south of the Falkland Islands.