Thursday, July 21st 2011 - 09:30 UTC

Cameron regrets having hired former editor at heart of phone-hacking scandal

British Prime Minister David Cameron, defending his integrity in an emergency debate in parliament, said on Wednesday he regretted the uproar caused by his hiring of a former newspaper editor at the heart of a phone-hacking scandal.

British PM “catastrophic error or judgement” according to the opposition (Photo Reuters)

Under pressure from opponents to apologise, he said Andy Coulson, his former spokesman who once edited Rupert Murdoch's News of the World, had denied knowing of phone-hacking by the paper. But should Coulson turn out to have lied, the prime minister said he would then offer an apology.

Beleaguered but not seen under serious threat of being dumped by his party after less than 15 months in office, Cameron defended his actions and those of his staff in dealings with the police and Murdoch's News Corp media empire.

But the 44-year-old Conservative premier said after his toughest two weeks in power: “You don't make decisions in hindsight; you make them in the present. You live and you learn - and believe you me, I have learnt.”

Cameron, who cut short a tour of Africa as parliament delayed its summer recess to quiz him, said in his opening statement: “I have an old-fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. But if it turns out I have been lied to, that would be a moment for a profound apology. And, in that event, I can tell you I will not fall short.”

Labour's Ed Miliband, whose muted first year as opposition leader has been given a boost by his assault on Cameron over the scandal, calling the hiring of Coulson a “catastrophic error of judgment”.

“Why doesn't he do more than give a half-apology and provide the full apology now for hiring Mr Coulson and bringing him into the heart of Downing Street?” Miliband asked.

Meantime international media reported Wednesday Rupert Murdoch had flown out of London following his testimony before lawmakers on the phone hacking scandal that has rocked Britain.

The communication’s mogul, who faced Tuesday’s UK parliament, had to answer inquiries over his newspaper’s phone hacking allegations. Murdoch apparently left the country in a private jet leaving from the Luton airport (northern London).-
 

42 comments Feed

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1 briton (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 02:09 pm Report abuse
you reap what you sow, old chap.
at this rate, you wont last , till the next election .
2 GeoffWard2 (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 02:52 pm Report abuse
? Murdoch?
3 Marcos Alejandro (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 03:40 pm Report abuse
I wonder how many Brits believed the shaving cream“attack” to Murdoch, now the attention is on Wendy and not so much to the main issue.
Brainwash?

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/phone-hacking/8651617/Rupert-Murdoch-on-Wendi-Deng-my-very-tough-wife.html
4 so_far (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 04:52 pm Report abuse
#3 You right Marcos,

Corruption exists in greater or lesser level in the political arena of many countries (if not almost all).

However, the degree of corruption that today the UK has started to worry the important organizations in the world, mainly because it is a corrupt elite, that is the big corporations and interests ecnonómicos now directing the main activities of the country.

This has led to a growing concern because it seems to be getting worse.

In that sense, it is interesting analysis made by Peter Apps of Reuters, as well as the reports of Transparency International.

ca.reuters.com/article/topNews/idCATRE76J25L20110720?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0

www.transparency.org.uk/ti-uk-programmes/corruption-in-the-uk

Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3

Both exposed the sad reality of the UK, which many refuse to accept and with pathetic autism say there is no corruption in the country that soon will change to the name UK & Corp.

If only economic interests remain the main vector FCO and the nation, surely we can expect future serious conflict with many countries worldwide. (In addition to Argentina over the Malvinas theft, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya ... etc.etc.)

It is time for real honest British citizenships change history and bring in peace in their own country and with other nations acting properly.
5 ElaineB (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 05:23 pm Report abuse
I expect he does regret hiring Andy Coulson. I regretted hiring a woman who had excellent references and a clean police record and went on to steal from my business. I could not have known she would do that until I caught her and sacked her.
6 geo (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 08:14 pm Report abuse
Murdoch's TNTW was only attemting to do in a small way what the governments of USA,UK,Canada,Australia,New Zealand.

Some ( ! ) SPY SYSTEMS vacuum billions of messages daily ..
home,office,mobile ..phones,emails,fax,telex ( internet & comments !!),
satellite transmissions ,microwave links,voice,text images captured
by satellites continiously orbiting the earth and processed by
high powered computers...
7 briton (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 09:19 pm Report abuse
geo Marcos , so_far , but not far enough,
the only reason why Murdoch did not invest in argentina,
was because you were more corupt than he was,
pot kettle black, mmm
8 Forgetit87 (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 09:32 pm Report abuse
Since Mercopress's so fond of pubishing British news, I hope it'll soon have something about this: www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OJijEkmalE&feature=feedu
9 stick up your junta (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 09:46 pm Report abuse
@8

Well has you said the Brasil street children aint innoncent,so maybe the Mau Mau got what they deserved

Mau Mau militants were also guilty of widespread atrocities. At Lari, on the night of March 25–26, 1953, Mau Mau forces herded 120 Kikuyu into huts and set fire to them, killing any who attempted to escape.[156] Kikuyu were also tortured, mutilated and murdered by Mau Mau in large numbers.[157]

Thirty-two British civilians were murdered by Mau Mau militants. The most well known Mau Mau victim was Michael Ruck, aged six, who was murdered along with his parents. Newspapers in Kenya and abroad published graphic murder details, including images of young Michael with bloodied teddy bears and trains strewn on his bedroom floor

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1375967/Kenya-Mau-Mau-atrocities-1950s-dossier.html
10 Forgetit87 (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 09:59 pm Report abuse
Don't care about any of that; I just want to see the screaming back and forth this is likely to generate in here.

PS - the DailyMail, really?
11 stick up your junta (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 10:03 pm Report abuse
Something more uptodate than 1953

Brazil, 20 police officers arrested, suspected of being a death squad

SAO PAULO — Brazilian authorities say they have arrested nearly 20 police officers suspected of taking part in a death squad that allegedly murdered and tortured innocent women and children.
Federal police spokesman Elias Abraao says 19 Goias state troopers face charges ranging from murder and hiding bodies to torture and gang formation.
He says the group was active for at least 10 years and killed at least 40 people.

www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/02/16/ap/latinamerica/main7355168.shtml

www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-12489109
12 briton (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 10:06 pm Report abuse
celticmeltdown.webs.com/corruption.htm

www.grapevine.is/Home/ReadArticle/US-Considering-Sanctions-Against-Iceland-Over-Whaling

www.icenews.is/index.php/2009/12/10/icelandic-opposition-leader-denies-macau-corruption-allegations/
www.heritage.org/research/reports/2010/04/cronyism-and-corruption-are-killing-economic-freedom-in-argentina
www.estandardsforum.org/argentina/business-indicators?id=167

and these hypocrites, complain about great Britain,
pot kettle black.

,,
13 Forgetit87 (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 10:11 pm Report abuse
@stick up your junta

We have already had this discussion before, and I remember I've remarked many times how dumb you are, thinking you can comment on an issue by googling random links. But go ahead; just don't forget this: you know about those 20 policemen because they have been investigated and were arrested. Those British that castrated the Kenyans, on the other hand, have not been punished in any way, and were probably considered national heroes at the time they commited those atrocities. Meanwhile, the Daily Mail and the Telegraph and other ultra-nationalist, the-UK-can-do-no-wrong outlets are trying to whitewash the crimes your men did less than a century ago. So don't you think your childish attempt to divert attention to your crimes proves we're equal. There is a difference between us two.
14 Forgetit86 (#) Jul 21st, 2011 - 10:17 pm Report abuse
Here, sticky, one more link for you to ignore or to divert attention from wth more random stuff: britisharmykillings.org.uk/category/1/Crimes-in-Iraq
15 Marcos Alejandro (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 04:25 am Report abuse
Sticks friends

“Four elderly Kenyans were give the go-ahead at the High Court today to sue the British government over alleged colonial atrocities committed during the Mau Mau uprising
At the earlier hearing the judge was told that Mr Mutua and Mr Nzili had been castrated, Mr Nyingi was beaten unconscious in an incident in which 11 men were clubbed to death, and Mrs Mara had been subjected to appalling sexual abuse”

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/kenya/8651727/Four-Kenyans-allowed-to-sue-British-government-over-torture.html
16 stick up your junta (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 06:02 am Report abuse
Great arrest rate the Brazil police have

Brazilian police 'execute thousands'

Hundreds, possibly thousands of people are shot by police every year in Brazil, a BBC investigation has found.

news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/4463010.stm
17 GeoffWard2 (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 07:32 am Report abuse
Re Geo @ #6,

if spyware, tapping & hacking is employed by everybody all the time across all countries, by companies and by governments, why is it such a big deal when Murdoch does it to get a story? Do we not enjoy the stories - the more salacious the better? Are we a bit hypocritical?

Or is there one rule for the Establishment/government, and a different rule for the rest?

OK, Murdoch is powerful, but not THAT powerful. I guess the powers that be decided that the time has come to 'trim his wings'.
18 Forgetit87 (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 07:34 am Report abuse
I'm going to repeat this, so you can feel your mediocrity better.

You know about those policemen because they have been investigated and were arrested. Those British that castrated the Kenyans, on the other hand, have not been punished in any way, and were probably considered national heroes at the time they commited those atrocities. Meanwhile, the Daily Mail and the Telegraph and other ultra-nationalist, the-UK-can-do-no-wrong outlets are trying to whitewash the crimes your men did less than a century ago. So don't you think your childish attempt to divert attention from your crimes proves we're equal. There is a difference between us two.

And what's your answer? Another random link. You must be emptiest poster on is forum, sticky. Two can pay this game, though.

“Hanan Saleh Matrud was playing with her friends in a narrow alley which ran beside her house on 21 August last year when the armoured personnel carrier drew up, some 50 metres away.

”A unit of troops from the King's Regiment then spilled out of the vehicle. Stories differ about what happened next. The troops insist they came under attack from stone-throwing mobs, and a warning shot was fired. Locals say the only crowds were playing kids, who had been coaxed into the open by the soldiers' offers of chocolate.

“What is certain is that Hanan, a shy eight-year-old, fell after the shot was fired - her abdomen slashed open by a ricocheting bullet.”

britisharmykillings.org.uk/product/446-16/Hanan-Saleh-Matrud

PS- Besides, sticky, who suffers from crimes from our own sadistic officers are Brazilian ourselves. Our shit is our own. You have no stake in this, so STFU. Who suffers from your country's abuses, on the are hand, are other peoples - Kenyans and Indians in a recent past, Iraqis not lon ago...
19 Forgetit86 (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 07:51 am Report abuse
Not all countries do that, Geoff. It's mostly the US and the fawning allies whom it pushed similar 'anti-terrorist' legislation. It's funny how you try to understate an issue when it afflicts the UK.
20 GeoffWard2 (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 08:16 am Report abuse
Not really, Forgetit.
I also totally understate the extent of corruption and mayhem in Brasil.

I suppose if Brasil or Argentina or any totalitarian state had the capacity of a GCHQ, they would also use it fully. It would be naive to think otherwise.
21 Forgetit86 (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 08:29 am Report abuse
If, by saying that the average Brazilian is a corrupt criminal, you're understating our problem, then good grief - I can't imagine what overstatement would sound like. BTW, according to wikileaks, the BR government had the opportunity to push for similar 'anti-terrorism' legislation (the US was pressuring for that) - legislation that would've curtailed civil rights, including the rights of social movements to publicly press for their issues. And the government, more specifically Ms Rousseff, said no.
22 stick up your junta (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 09:03 am Report abuse
You know about those policemen because they have been investigated and were arrested.

Authorities say they are looking at the possible role of what they call rogue police, in a potential act of reprisal for recent arrests of eight officers.

A death squad has killed at least 30 people in the Brazilian state of Rio de Janeiro, police say.
Rights groups accuse police of carrying out a 1993 massacre in the state.

news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4401525.stm

Two can pay this game, though

Bring it on,I bet you run out of links before I do :-))))
23 briton (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 10:28 am Report abuse
when they run out of arguments,
they blame others and reply with another subject,
what really is the truth,
only the dead know, and they are not talking lol.
24 GeoffWard2 (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 10:30 am Report abuse
No, Forgetit #21,
you know I am talking about corruption on the political classes;
I have said before that I find the man in the street even naively honest, though willing to condone intense corruption in his country's ruling classes.

Dilma's unwillingness to bring in anti-terrorist legislation would catch many people like the Italian Red Brigade murderer (Good) - and would indeed, catch herself and other South American national leaders! (Not so good, from her point of view).
25 stick up your junta (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 12:58 pm Report abuse
Blinding read forgetit

Brazil - Amnesty International Report

www.amnesty.org/en/region/brazil/report-2008

Seems even off duty Firemen are in on the killing of street children in Brazil
26 Forgetit87 (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 04:35 pm Report abuse
@sticky

“You know about those policemen because they have been investigated and were arrested.”

How does your link prove me wrong? It says such authorities are pursuing 'rogue' police, doesn't it? And I'm sorry sticky, but this is the last time I'm going to reply to you. You're an ultra-natonalist immature troll who can't have some truths regarding your 'great' nation thrown at your face - truths such as those told by the Kenyans I talked about before - and think they can be annuled if only you can mud sling other nations. The fact of the matter, though, is that you can only talk about our rogue police because we have investigated and/or arrested them - something you haven't done to your own rogue police and soldiers (whom, btw even your media defends). I can talk about them because their victims are demanding justice, not because your Justice has done something about them. And as I said before - our wrongdoings are ours; no one other than us are hurt by them. The suffering your rogue officers inflict, on the other hand, target mainly peoples of other nationalities. Try to refute me, and we'll talk. But don't you think that I will be engaging with this silly competition for very long with a dumb animal such as you.

PS - it seems you can't even properly read your links.

@Geoff

This is what you said:
“Brasilian life is a constant, never-changing ronde of criminality,
at all levels and in all spheres of life.”

“All spheres of life”, “constant”, “never-changing.” C'mon Geoff, don't you have the courage of your convictions? Why the double-facedness?
27 stick up your junta (#) Jul 22nd, 2011 - 05:55 pm Report abuse
And as I said before - our wrongdoings are ours; no one other than us are hurt by them.

So that makes it all ok then LOL

In Brazil, prisons are normally overcrowded and unfit for human habitation. Prisoners and suspects are frequently killed, tortured, beaten, subject to electrical shocks, and all sorts of maltreatment at police stations and prisons.

A considerable number of police precincts, perhaps even a majority of them, include a torture room. The most common torture technique employed by the Brazilian police is called pau de arara, or parrot’s perch.

The parrot’s perch, as a report from the Human Rights Watch (HRW) correctly explains, “is a bar on which the victim is suspended from the back of his knees, with his hands tied to his ankles.
28 Fido Dido (#) Jul 23rd, 2011 - 04:45 am Report abuse
when they run out of arguments,
they blame others and reply with another subject,

And that's exactly what sticky idiot who received a stick in his junta, does.
29 malen (#) Jul 23rd, 2011 - 12:09 pm Report abuse
“you can only talk about our rogue police because we have investigated...sth you havent done to your own rogue police and soldiers”
totally agree..... britain is not precisely a country able to teach us nothing about human rights. 1.000.000 killed in afghanistan, never heard of a militar been judged because of abuse of militar force, their press doesnt show what is happenning every day on battle to not turn the public opinion against, and their prisons....suicide is the most frecuent act for someone when getting in jail (human rights anywhere ?)
www.wsws.org/articles/2005/set2005/pris-s06.shtml
we dont need to learn nothing about you thank you.
30 stick up your junta (#) Jul 23rd, 2011 - 04:22 pm Report abuse
when they run out of arguments,
they blame others and reply with another subject

The subject tooth fairy was Britains role in Human rights abuses in 1953,I just gently pointed out Forgetits beloved Brazils not too good record on the SUBJECT
31 Forgetit86 (#) Jul 23rd, 2011 - 06:03 pm Report abuse
Neither is your country, sticky. I'm just not in the mood to engage in a dumb discussion with a dumb individual and mud sling your nation as persistently as you do to mine. I just don't care about the UK (or you) that much.

But there it is: www.amnesty.org/en/region/uk/report-2008 And remember, that's only the beggining.
32 stick up your junta (#) Jul 23rd, 2011 - 06:48 pm Report abuse
2010 :-)

www.amnesty.org/en/news-and-updates/brazil-amnesty-international-condemns-violence-rio-de-janeiro-2010-11-26

Rio police have killed over 500 people so far this year in so-called “acts of resistance”. Large swathes of the city continue to be dominated by paramilitary police groups.
33 Forgetit86 (#) Jul 23rd, 2011 - 07:37 pm Report abuse
*beginning
34 malen (#) Jul 23rd, 2011 - 10:41 pm Report abuse
overpopulated jails in uk and prisoners committting suicidice
www.wsws.org/articles/2005/sep2005/pris-s06.shtml
and an interesting view of conflicts in afghanistan libya and iraq
humanitarian rights you want to teach us???? you live constantly in war..in a violent culture, makes me laugh such hipocrasy
www.english.pravda.ru/history/23-07-2011/118576-NATO_in_trouble-O/
cease the fire what you are doing in libya doesnt help anybody
35 stick up your junta (#) Jul 24th, 2011 - 04:53 pm Report abuse
Prisons of Death
By Marcela Valente

ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=39928

In the (eastern) province of Buenos Aires (the country’s most populous), 30,000 inmates are packed into installations built for 13,000.

Categorized | Feature, Human Rights
Tools Of Torture: A Look Inside Argentina’s Jails
by Marc Rogers, 23 March 2010. Tags: overcrowding, prisons, violence

www.argentinaindependent.com/feature/tools-of-torture-a-look-inside-argentina%e2%80%99s-jails-/
36 malen (#) Jul 24th, 2011 - 05:17 pm Report abuse
you seem doing it better sticky
directly in your jails prisoners killed themselves
and if you are good only for making wars and money with wars then you are living in a more violent environment (Ive read that kind of comment here)
have you ever been not involved in war?? any time tell us
i see you are proud of it, your diputados make a training programe with militars sharing their duty(here not), militars go to school (here not),you have the militars culture in your soup (here not)
there is here a programme to teach peace culture. Impossible for you to do that as the example you can give is always that of participating in wars.
hope it functions
www.english.pravda.ru/history/23-07-2011/118576-NATO_in_trouble-0/
37 stick up your junta (#) Jul 24th, 2011 - 08:13 pm Report abuse
see you are proud of it, your diputados make a training programe with militars sharing their duty(here not), militars go to school (here not),you have the militars culture in your soup (here not)

We have never had our country run by the Military,unlike Argentina

Argentina military junta members,
top officers, and ministers
www.yendor.com/vanished/junta.html
38 malen (#) Jul 24th, 2011 - 08:38 pm Report abuse
and we have judged them (argentinian militars)
you continue in the killing in the wars and dont judge nothing.
to build peace you dont have to make wars, you need education.
you participate in wars because you get a secondary benefit from them, you make a lot of money. i dont eat glass.
i would like to be shown every day in your free press the quantity of afghans iraquies and libaneses that are been killed every day. thousands and thousands. injustice victims of lunatics with little possibility to defend themselves. wars that last an eternity and doesnt resolve conflicts on the contrary they generate more war.
this region fortunatelly is living pacific times and also building its own ways of defending ourselves with peace, by our own, when having problems, like ecuador and bolivia. we as a region all go to defend one to another and defend the democracy.
we dont want foreigner interventions we dont want you to teach your humanitarian way of understanding human rights. thank you.
39 stick up your junta (#) Jul 24th, 2011 - 08:58 pm Report abuse
you participate in wars because you get a secondary benefit from them, you make a lot of money.

Libya: Britain's £1bn warLibya conflict could cost UK taxpayers £1bn over six months as Gaddafi clings on and cost of involvement soars

Cost of war in Afghanistan soars to £2.5bn• Iraq total also up despite pull-out &middot
• Annual bill for conflicts hits £4.5bn
40 malen (#) Jul 24th, 2011 - 09:00 pm Report abuse
you have a militar industry
you sell arms and militar equipment tell me how much money do you get with that??
41 GeoffWard2 (#) Jul 25th, 2011 - 01:24 pm Report abuse
Re. Forgetit #26:
“Brasilian life is a constant, never-changing ronde of criminality,
at all levels and in all spheres of life.” (Geoffward)
“All spheres of life”, “constant”, “never-changing.” C'mon Geoff, don't you have the courage of your convictions? Why the double-facedness? (Forgetit)

[For illustrative purposes only]
“All spheres of life”:
(i) Unemployed, poor, un-housed, favela dwellers – street beggers/street crime, ‘black economy’, petty theft, drug trafficking, car thefts, gatos, mugging, gun crime, lost bullets, abduction & extortion;
(ii) Employed, middle class – credit agreements, drug addiction/dealing, land appropriation, any from (i);
(iii) Corporate/business sphere – skimming off the deal, fraud, sweeteners, buying politicians, deforestation, land-deals/appropriation, any from (ii);
(iv) Political/governmental administrative – Mensalao, fixing the kick-backs, fixing the law, immunity & impunity, overseas bank accounts, nepotism, institutionalizing corruption, politicizing the legal process, creating but not upholding the laws of the land, land deals, any from (iii).

Lower spheres have different motivations and different capabilities to undertake ‘higher level’ crimes; and, as usual, it is the poor bloody middle class that suffer most from the array of crimes, whilst the basally-poor may suffer more in proportion to their limited assets.
The disproportionate beneficiaries of crime are the drug dealers and the politicians.

You may have a different array of details if you do the same exercise, but the pattern hold good.
The solutions involve top-down management of change, as I have said elsewhere.
42 malen (#) Jul 25th, 2011 - 01:43 pm Report abuse
for you sticky the sellers of arms and the buyers of arms mutually engage in an obscene corrupt and violent trade.
watch how you are making business with wars
www.globalissues.org/article/74/the-arms-trade-is-big-business
i dont buy your double moral speech. thank you. i pass.

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