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Montevideo, December 5th 2016 - 04:31 UTC

Falklands recover 370 hectares of Stanley Common made minefields in 1982 by Argentine forces

Thursday, May 17th 2012 - 11:29 UTC
Full article 43 comments
The cleared area contains the Stone Corral, an exquisite piece of early Falklands’ history The cleared area contains the Stone Corral, an exquisite piece of early Falklands’ history
However five smaller minefields remain and are clearly marked However five smaller minefields remain and are clearly marked

Thirty years after the end of the Falkland Islands conflict, 370 hectares of Stanley Common south of Sapper Hill recently cleared by BACTEC (mine action and bomb disposal specialists), have been opened to the public, reports the Penguin News.

During the conflict the Argentine forces planted 20,000 anti-personnel mines and 5,000 anti-tank mines spread over 13 sq km in 117 locations in highly variable terrain.

Particularly strategic for the occupying Argentine forces were areas surrounding Stanley in an attempt to stop the British from recovering the town. Only recently has the onerous task of clearing some of the fields started as part of a UK effort.

However in spite of the major clearance in areas close to Stanley, Environmental Officer Nick Rendell said it should be noted that five smaller minefields remain and are clearly marked.

The accessible area contains the Stone Corral, an exquisite piece of early Falklands’ history as well as Eagle Rock, a notable landscape feature.

It also includes the two largest ponds in the Stanley area, Mile Pond and Round Pond. The latter attracts interesting waterfowl and rare vagrant bird species have been reported there in the past.

A three kilometre stretch of coastline is now accessible from Goose Green via Lake Point to the entrance to Mullet Creek, where a further two kilometres of shoreline offers additional fishing opportunities.

Mr Rendell explained that the best point to gain access to the Stone Corral is via the old Pump House track, and then by foot or vehicle through an access gate into the released area.

“As the corral is an important historic feature please refrain from climbing on or removing rocks from its walls,” he added.

The best vehicle access point to reach Mile Pond, Round Pond and the south coast is through the gate in the north east corner of the released area by the Sapper Hill water tanks although the area around the gate is quite damp and may become difficult to pass as it gets wetter over winter.

A temporary fence has been put in place between Mile Pond and the minefield to the east to restrict vehicles from travelling further south.

This area is also very wet and has been fenced to prevent damage to the ground. For access to the south coast the public should leave their vehicles at the gate, from which it is a 500 metre walk to Lake Point Beach and Round Pond. A key for the gate is available from the Environmental Planning Department for people with mobility difficulties. It is intended to remove the fence and gate when access to the coastal strip has been improved following further land releases.

A map of the area showing vehicle access points is available from the Environmental Planning Department website; www.epd.gov.fk
 

Categories: Politics, Falkland Islands.

Top Comments

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  • Alexei

    I sometimes wonder why the Argentines bothered to lay all those mines in the first place. Fat lot of good it did them, they still had their arses handed to them on a plate. Laying millions of virtually undetectable plastic anti-personnel mines, then not making nor keeping any record of their locations seems quite idiotic. The only explanation is that those who laid the mines knew that their defeat was inevitable, the mines were not put down for defence, but rather as an act of spite and malice.

    May 17th, 2012 - 12:13 pm 0
  • Think

    Ahhhhh….

    I was beginning to miss our monthly personal mine update…..

    But I must say that I strongly disagree with Mr. Rendell……...............

    “….The corral is an important historic feature please refrain from climbing on or removing rocks from its walls,” he says.

    I think he should mind his own business….
    If any Kelper wants some Argie stones for basing his garden gnomes, he is perfectly entitled to take some from that old Argie Corral!

    We all know what Argie historical features deserve…
    Let those stones go the same way this one went:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbjh2xjhIMA&feature=related

    May 17th, 2012 - 12:30 pm 0
  • honoria

    @ 2 Think
    There is no recorded date of construction or builder of the Sapper Hill corral but it was referred to by Lafone, which could date it to mid 1800s. As it is a important part of our history we choose to preserve it, which really is none of your business.

    May 17th, 2012 - 01:06 pm 0
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