Friday, January 4th 2013 - 22:09 UTC

Argentina implements strict rules and controls on the soccer industry

Every soccer team from the Argentine First and Second Division will as of this week have to open a bank account where they will deposit the total sum of money generated from soccer player transfers. Financial rights will now solely belong to the entities involved.

Measures in order to make the soccer players market more transparent

These measures were announced by Argentina’s AFIP tax agency head Ricardo Echegaray, who presented to the press a number of measures in order to make the soccer players market more transparent.

The objective of Resolution 3432, which will becomes with its publication in the Official Gazette, is “to reverse the current local soccer situation, where clubs are under the control of businessmen and agents,” said Echegaray during the press conference at the AFIP headquarters in Buenos Aires.

Echegaray explained that the national government intends to ensure that “soccer clubs are the main actors,” and to “heal” the soccer market by reducing tax evasion.

In order to achieve this aim, for tax purposes, financial rights will be solely owned by the clubs, which will also act as withholding agents for income tax in the soccer transfer operations.

A soccer agents register will be created, where clubs will have to give the names of those athletes they represent their contracts and inform the earning obtained, and another register will be created for “soccer businessmen.”

Regarding the players’ financial rights, Echegaray said that the measure “seeks to delimit” what he calls “21st century slavery,” through which one or more people are owners of a soccer player.

“A businessman no longer owns a person,” said Echegaray, adding that these types of investments in people “will have to be done through hedge funds” created by the clubs.

The AFIP director said that the fact the financial rights stay in the hands of the soccer clubs means that the transfer payment will be made through them.

“The funds must go through the soccer institution, no matter what,” and through the bank account open for this purpose.

Echegaray said that currently soccer clubs every week have to notify AFIP about their soccer squad.

“The new measure maintain this obligation, but creates a registry for the agents and another for soccer businessmen,” said Echegaray, adding that this will complete the cycle of necessary information.

“This means that when a transfer price is found to be unreasonable, the agency can determine a value based on the market prices,” said Echegaray, adding that this could lead to AFIP suspending the Individual Tax Code (CUIT) of those “businessmen” involved in the operations.

The measure understands by “soccer businessmen” those who invest in soccer player’s financial right and “then obtain a profit from the player’s transfer.
 

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1 ProRG_American (#) Jan 04th, 2013 - 10:17 pm Report abuse
Chileans stick to your own problems

www.foxnews.com/world/2013/01/04/chile-police-businessman-wife-die-as-home-burns-during-attack-by-mapuche/
2 surfer (#) Jan 04th, 2013 - 10:28 pm Report abuse
The money in that photo, it's real money, not Pesos. strange.
3 Shed-time (#) Jan 04th, 2013 - 10:35 pm Report abuse
@2 anyone want to explain what this is all about? I know little or nothing about the machinations of 'soccer'.
4 Pete Bog (#) Jan 04th, 2013 - 10:54 pm Report abuse
“The objective of Resolution 3432”

Have they been to the UN again?
5 reality check (#) Jan 04th, 2013 - 10:58 pm Report abuse
Me neither, but it look likes to me that the government is know going to have hands on control from revenue generated by soccer, did I read it right? maybe not, often said I am not very good at economics, hated it in college.

If I am right, I have a feeling this is not going to go down well with a nation that loves its football.

Then again I have to wonder where they going to go next to grab revenue, this must surely be scraping the bottom of the barrel.

Ferkin place gets more and more like 1984 every single day. Whilst I support the Islanders 100% and more, I still can not help feeling (not sorry, that's condescending) feeling for the people of Argentina.

Anyone care to guess what's next?
6 Shed-time (#) Jan 04th, 2013 - 11:10 pm Report abuse
From what I recall, all the teams are in debt, previous presidents bled them dry, no players are getting paid and the referees are making strange decisions. The government pays for rights to free football, so I guess they actually have to get something to put on the TV.

Not sure what all this is about though. Oh welll.
7 reality check (#) Jan 04th, 2013 - 11:27 pm Report abuse
Matters not, the ones that are any good, fuck off and play for a fortune elsewhere. You can bet their salaries are not paid into Argentine banks.

There you go KFC, exports, without imports, missed that one, surely there's $US there!!!!!
8 ProRG_American (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 12:20 am Report abuse
Good move against football corruption and evasion. Goes to show that the CFK government has the interest of the nation and public at heart.
9 huynhhai (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 02:24 am
Comment removed by the editor.
10 TerryH (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 02:29 am
Comment removed by the editor.
11 KFC de Pollo (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 04:58 am Report abuse
@8 what a joke you are
12 willi1 (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 08:26 am Report abuse
that are good news!
13 TipsyThink (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 09:53 am Report abuse
put up job...doping...money laundering...tax evasion = SPORT INDUSTRY
14 reality check (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 11:28 am Report abuse
Piggy Bank!!!!!
15 ElaineB (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 01:12 pm Report abuse
Argentine domestic football is really not very good but it does satisfy the tribal needs of certain people there. I think it is the Italian blood. The Italians have a saying, 'you can change your wife, you can change your religion but you can never change your football club'. So worshipping football is above romance or religion.

The Italian blood also imported their affection for corruption at every level. It is not considered wrong there, just beating the system. Something has to be socially unacceptable for it to stop. In Italy and Argentina it is perfectly acceptable to large sections of the population.

Argentine football has been bankrupt many times. I remember maybe a year or two ago the season could not start because of the lack of funds (the funds having disappeared into various pockets and overseas accounts). One club, San Lorenzo, not missing an opportunity to dupe a foreigner, persuaded Viggo Mortensen to bail them out. The fool had spent some of his childhood living in Argentina and continued to support his favourite team. Little did he know his money was going to disappear too. He should have a asked me. : )
16 reality check (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 02:17 pm Report abuse
I was stationed in Sardinia, living in Cagliari, our quarters were leased from the local council. One one occasion, when we needed a leaky tap fixed, an official called round to inspect it. We ere informed it could be up to a month before a plumber called. 200 Malborough exchanged hands, he was there the next day, a futher 200 Malborough later, he rapaired it.

You should have seen the Naafi, easily recogniseable by the Poly filled bullets holes on the exterior, courtesy of the local Mafiosa, does not do to refuse to pay protection.
17 Steveu (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 06:49 pm Report abuse
This could be a Messi business ;-)
18 reality check (#) Jan 05th, 2013 - 08:38 pm Report abuse
@17
Lol, that's a cracker!
19 Nostrolldamus The 5th (#) Jan 06th, 2013 - 06:20 am Report abuse
@15

And the saddest part of your “story”?

All that and the Italians ate still more decent people than you lot!

(and that's how the world sees it. Everyone loves Italians... you? not so much)
20 Shed-time (#) Jan 06th, 2013 - 10:46 am Report abuse
@19 All that you're saying is that 'all Argentinians' like Italians. Simply because the acceptance of corruption is a common cultural trait shared by Argentines and themselves.

You also share a common cultural trait with Germans, which is the succession of the pure germanic race, and a continuation of their war against the mongrels. That's why you accepted a huge number of them after the war, because your country wanted to continue their cause and allow them time to regroup, recompose and reform under the new ideologically racist and expansionist banner of'Peronism'. We all know that your eternal president has a germanic name, 'Kirchener', and we all know her policies are extensively Hitlerist.

Thankfully this mollycoddle of cultural traits simply leads you into the toilet, and away from any kind of racially pure utopia.
21 TipsyThink (#) Jan 06th, 2013 - 11:22 am Report abuse
bíased and fláccid comménts...
All Italians are neither Mafia nor córrupt....
22 Shed-time (#) Jan 06th, 2013 - 02:48 pm Report abuse
@20 That's not what I said. I said most Italians are a member of their government, so the cost of government in Italy is huge. These individuals barter for power by providing the Mafiosa with contracts for building and construction.

Like in Argentina, It's accepted.
23 Nostrolldamus The 5th (#) Jan 06th, 2013 - 03:44 pm Report abuse
@22

Yes, we took the corruption of the Italians, the goostepping of the Germans, the thieving of the Spanish, the arrogance of the French, the hypocrisy of the British, the naiveness of the natives indigenas, the greedyness of the Jews, and the extremism of the Arab. All in a nice wonderful mixture, especially for you.

hahahaha... but no, none of you are “racist” given you all perpetuate such stereotpypes. Well, then again, the hypocrisy you all display does tend to perpetuate the adage.
24 redpoll (#) Jan 06th, 2013 - 07:53 pm Report abuse
So now its the football clubs? The harridan seems to have an special knack of making enemies. Who is next? Well Spain is already a bugbear to her (Repsol), Britain (Falkland Islands) her own farmers, the teamsters union, Uruguay (dredging the river Plate channels), Ghana (ARA Libertad), The Australians, Bahamians and Bermudans (cruise ships) the US judge Griesa and even her own judiciary which one of her minions Rodazzo accuses of being colonized (by whom or is it just another trick by those Brits?) und so weiter Frau Furhrer
So just pick a quarrel with Lichtenstein or San Marino and give us all another laugh. BTW where is Timmerman? Hes been a bit quiet lately. Probabably off in Uruguay enjoying the beach and night life in Punta del Este
25 huynhhai (#) Jan 07th, 2013 - 01:53 am Report abuse
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26 huynhhai (#) Jan 07th, 2013 - 01:59 am Report abuse
These measures were announced by Argentina’s AFIP tax agency head Ricardo Echegaray, who presented to the press a number of measures in order to make the soccer players market more transparent.

The objective of Resolution 3432, which will becomes with its publication in the Official Gazette, is “to reverse the current local soccer situation, where clubs are under the control of businessmen and agents,” said Echegaray during the press conference at the AFIP headquarters in Buenos Aires.

Echegaray explained that the national government intends to ensure that “soccer clubs are the main actors,” and to “heal” the soccer market by reducing tax evasion.

In order to achieve this aim, for tax purposes, financial rights will be solely owned by the clubs, which will also act as withholding agents for income tax in the soccer transfer operations.

A soccer agents register will be created, where clubs will have to give the names of those athletes they represent their contracts and inform the earning obtained, and another register will be created for “soccer businessmen.”

Regarding the players’ financial rights, Echegaray said that the measure “seeks to delimit” what he calls “21st century slavery,” through which one or more people are owners of a soccer player.

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