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UK Coca Cola adopts color coded labeling with nutritional information

Tuesday, September 9th 2014 - 03:44 UTC
Full article 11 comments
The color-coding shows how much fat, saturated fat, salt, sugar and energy (calories) is in a product. The color-coding shows how much fat, saturated fat, salt, sugar and energy (calories) is in a product.
The company has reduced Sprite calorie content by 30% and launched a lower calorie cola with a third less sugar and third fewer calories than regular Coke The company has reduced Sprite calorie content by 30% and launched a lower calorie cola with a third less sugar and third fewer calories than regular Coke

Coca-Cola Great Britain (CCGB) is adopting the UK Government’s voluntary front of pack nutrition labeling scheme, which combines nutrient amounts and percentage Reference Intakes (RIs) with color-coding to show how much fat, saturated fat, salt, sugar and energy (calories) is in a product.

Coca-Cola Great Britain has long been committed to providing consumers with clear nutritional information and has featured Guideline Daily Amount (now known as Reference Intake) labeling on the front of its cans and bottles in Great Britain since 2007. The adoption of the voluntary, color-coded front-of-pack scheme in Great Britain is consistent with The Coca Cola's company’s global commitment to provide consumers with transparent nutrition information on the front of its packs.

Having gauged British consumers’ views on the scheme, the company has decided to introduce the new labeling on all of the brands it sells in Great Britain to help make it easier for people to make choices that support a more balanced diet at-a-glance whilst shopping.

Jon Woods, general manager of Coca-Cola UK & Ireland, said: “The increased choice of products available in stores today is great news for shoppers and we believe that front-of-pack nutritional labeling can help people choose a balanced diet. We have monitored the labeling scheme since it started to appear in-store and asked shoppers in Great Britain for their views. They told us they want a single, consistent labeling scheme across all food and drink products to help them make the right choices for them and their families. That is why we have decided to adopt it across our full range of brands.”

Jane Ellison, parliamentary under-secretary of state for public health, said: “I am delighted that Coca-Cola Great Britain has adopted this Government’s voluntary front of pack labeling scheme. It will help consumers make informed choices and lead a healthier lifestyle. We want all businesses to give people clear and consistent information about their food and drink.”

Professor Susan Jebb, University of Oxford and chair of the public health responsibility deal food network, said: ”I really welcome this announcement that Coca-Cola Great Britain are signing up to the Responsibility Deal pledge on Front of Pack Labeling. Together with their other work to decrease the sugar content of their products, introduce lower calorie options and reduce portion size, it represents a real step forward for the company in recognizing their responsibilities for public health and supporting their customers to make healthier choices and control their calorie intake.”

This is the latest in a series of actions Coca-Cola Great Britain is taking in support of the Government’s Public Health Responsibility Deal and as part of its broader efforts to help people lead healthier lives. In the past 18 months, it has reduced the calorie content of Sprite by 30%, introduced a small, 25cl can of Coca-Cola, Diet Coke and Coca-Cola Zero and launched Coca-Cola Life – a lower calorie cola with a third less sugar and a third fewer calories than regular cola.

Coca-Cola Great Britain is also investing £20m in community based physical activity projects to inspire one million people to get more active by 2020.

Today, the company has 23 brands in Great Britain and all its major brands have a low or no calorie option. More than 40% of the cola it sells in GB is no sugar, no calorie – either Diet Coke or Coca-Cola Zero – and in the last six years it has also reduced the calorie content of Fanta Orange by 30%, Oasis by 35% and Lilt by 56%.
 

Top Comments

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  • lsolde

    Have never liked the taste of Coca-Cola anyway.

    Sep 09th, 2014 - 10:06 am 0
  • ilsen

    @1 that's odd. Me too! Nasty stuff.

    I can only drink it if;
    it is over lots of ice, with plenty of freshly squeezed lime juice and drowned in a quality Caribbean rum.
    Then, and only then, is Coca Cola actually drinkable.
    :-)

    Sep 09th, 2014 - 10:37 am 0
  • lsolde

    @2,
    Although l haven't drunk C/C in years, it was refreshing when taken in the morning after getting drunk the night before.
    lt had to be icy cold though.
    Then l used to hold the still cold bottle to my forehead to relieve the throbbing.
    :-)))))))))))))))
    l don't get drunk anymore so C/C's only use is cleaning old coins or getting rust off chrome.
    lol!

    Sep 09th, 2014 - 01:08 pm 0
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