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Montevideo, December 17th 2018 - 03:10 UTC

Wales and Argentina celebrate 150th anniversary of migration to Patagonia

Wednesday, July 1st 2015 - 02:22 UTC
Full article 20 comments
Argentine Ambassador Alicia Castro with Dame Rosemary Butler, Presiding officer from the National Assembly of Wales Argentine Ambassador Alicia Castro with Dame Rosemary Butler, Presiding officer from the National Assembly of Wales
A view of the ground floor where an exhibition of photos from Welsh settlements in Patagonia was opened on Monday. A view of the ground floor where an exhibition of photos from Welsh settlements in Patagonia was opened on Monday.

Argentina and Wales celebrated on Monday at the National Assembly for Wales, in Cardiff, their historical links with a reception especially dedicated to mark the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the first Welsh settlers to Patagonia. Musicians from both nations gave a concert and a photography exhibition on the Welsh settlements in Patagonia was inaugurated.

 The event, which drew local politicians, contributed to strengthen the excellent relationship between Argentina and the British nation at the time of this anniversary. Before the reception, Ambassador Alicia Castro held a meeting with Presiding Officer Dame Rosemary Butler, in which issues of common interest were discussed.

During the meeting, the Welsh politician expressed to the Ambassador her wish to meet Argentine parliamentarians when making an official visit to our country in the coming months.

“I feel proud to represent a country that welcomed and gave a homeland to the Welsh and their values, a country which has always opened its doors to people of all nationalities and cultures, and which continues to do so today”, stated the Argentine diplomat.

On Monday, the Senedd’s ground floor hosted a photographic exhibition by prestigious Argentine photographer Marcos Zimmermann dedicated to the Welsh communities in Patagonia.

Along with Dame Rosemary Butler and Ambassador Castro, the reception was attended by Lord Wigley, Chair of the Committee charged with the celebrations; members of the National Assembly for Wales, local cultural figureheads and members of various Argentine-Welsh associations. Musicians from both nations gave a concert of tango and folklore and Argentine wines were served.

During 2015, the excellent relationship between Argentina and Wales is enhanced by a wide range of activities that are taking place on both sides of the Atlantic to celebrate the common history shared by both peoples. The Embassy of Argentina is coordinating the calendar of events taking place during this 150th anniversary alongside Welsh authorities and the Province of Chubut in Patagonia. (Report from Argentine embassy in London).-

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  • Skip

    Wales?

    Not the English? Why do so many people have difficulty with the concept of the UK and confuse it for England...... but they don't confuse Wales with England?

    Weird

    Jul 01st, 2015 - 03:04 am 0
  • gordo1

    What a load of crap! I wonder what Simon Weston must be thinking!

    ”Falklands War[edit]
    In 1982, the Welsh Guards (CO Lieutenant-Colonel John Rickett) formed part of the 5th Infantry Brigade of the British Task Force sent to liberate the Falkland Islands from Argentinian occupation during the Falklands War. On 7 June they were on board the ill-fated Sir Galahad, which was accompanied by Sir Tristram, waiting to be landed at Bluff Cove though they were delayed from doing so. However, attack was imminent after the landing craft were spotted by Argentinian observers. At 2:00 am, five Dagger and five A-4 Skyhawk aircraft were seen over the Falklands. Shortly afterwards, the Daggers were the first to attack. Only a short time later, the Skyhawks reached Fitzroy, with three of the aircraft hitting the Sir Galahad two or more times with horrific consequences. Sir Tristram was also hit which killed two crewmen, both ships were ablaze. The attack on Sir Galahad culminated in high casualties, 48 dead, 32 of them Welsh Guards, 11 other Army personnel and five crewmen from Sir Galahad herself. There were many wounded, many suffering from horrendous burns caused by fire from the burning ships, the best known being Simon Weston. The burnt-out Sir Galahad was later scuttled at sea to allow her to become a war grave

    Jul 01st, 2015 - 06:26 am 0
  • HansNiesund

    I guess it's only typical that the Argentines are so keen to celebrate Welsh colonialism whilst continually keeping their knickers in a twist over the English or British version.

    I wonder if it was mentioned at all that the first Welsh settlers were saved from starvation by the Tehuelche Indians, that the Welsh tried to defend the Tehuelche during the Conquest of the Desert, and that victorious BA sought to impose Spanish language and culture on the Welsh at the end of that war?

    Probably not.

    Jul 01st, 2015 - 08:42 am 0
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