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Montevideo, December 14th 2017 - 08:20 UTC

US and Havana deal on regular flights, a boom for tourism, but does Cuba have the infrastructure

Friday, December 18th 2015 - 08:09 UTC
Full article 25 comments
The deal opens the way for U.S. airlines to negotiate with Cuba for 20 routes a day to Havana and 10 to each of Cuba's other nine major airports The deal opens the way for U.S. airlines to negotiate with Cuba for 20 routes a day to Havana and 10 to each of Cuba's other nine major airports
The reestablishment of regular aviation to Cuba after half a century will almost certainly be the biggest business development since normalizing of relations The reestablishment of regular aviation to Cuba after half a century will almost certainly be the biggest business development since normalizing of relations
Havana's international airport is barely able to accommodate current demand for flights into the city and virtually every hotel is booked well into next year. Havana's international airport is barely able to accommodate current demand for flights into the city and virtually every hotel is booked well into next year.
“We are advancing our shared interests and working together on complex issues that for too long defined and divided us,” Obama said in a statement “We are advancing our shared interests and working together on complex issues that for too long defined and divided us,” Obama said in a statement

United States and Cuba have reached a deal to allow as many as 110 regular airline flights a day, allowing a surge of American travel to Cuba that could eventually flood the island with hundreds of thousands more U.S. visitors a year, officials said Thursday on the anniversary of detente between the foes.

 The deal reached Wednesday night after three days of talks in Washington opens the way for U.S. airlines to negotiate with Cuba's government for 20 routes a day to Havana and 10 to each of Cuba's other nine major airports, the State Department said. While it will likely take months before the first commercial flight to Havana, the reestablishment of regular aviation to Cuba after half a century will almost certainly be the biggest business development since the two countries began normalizing relations last year.

Even a fraction of the newly allowed number of flights would more than double current U.S. air traffic to Cuba but it may take years to reach that number. U.S. travel to Cuba has risen by more than 50% this year alongside an even great surge in travel from other countries, overwhelming the country's outmoded tourist infrastructure.

Havana's international airport is barely able to accommodate current demand for flights into the city and virtually every hotel is booked well into next year.

It seems almost certain that Cuban officials will allow new U.S. flights slowly in order to make sure the government can handle the increase in travel.

The United States and Cuba publicly say they're delighted with the state of diplomatic relations a year after Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro declared the end to more than 50 years of official hostility. The two countries have reopened embassies in Havana and Washington; agreed to a pilot program restarting direct mail service; signed two deals on environmental protection; and launched talks on issues from human rights to compensation for U.S. properties confiscated by Cuba's revolution.

“We are advancing our shared interests and working together on complex issues that for too long defined and divided us,” Obama said in a statement issued Thursday.

“Meanwhile, the United States is in a stronger position to engage the people and governments of our hemisphere,” he added. “Congress can support a better life for the Cuban people by lifting an embargo that is a legacy of a failed policy.”

The U.S. secretaries of state, commerce and agriculture and the Cuban-born deputy secretary of homeland security have all made official visits to start discussions on unsexy but vital technical matters like produce inspection and port regulations.

But until this week there has been virtually no progress on business ties, a major part of Obama's new policy on Cuba. When he unveiled that policy on Dec. 17, 2014, Obama delivered a glowing vision of American visitors using debit and credit cards made possible by new banking links. U.S. companies would export a wide range of goods including telecommunications equipment.

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  • yankeeboy

    As soon as the Castros are dead Cuba will become a USA colony again.

    I can't wait to go.

    Dec 18th, 2015 - 01:42 pm 0
  • ElaineB

    @1 Speaking nonsense again. Of course you have never been there. I have. Cuba will never be a US colony nor would the US want it to be, so you will never visit. Cuban can be grateful for that.

    Make the post above as another wrong prediction by yankeeboy.

    Dec 18th, 2015 - 02:02 pm 0
  • yankeeboy

    Elaine, I am barred from going to Cuba as you well know. Cuba used to be a USA colony, when it was widely successful and will become one again.

    The people are literally dying to have our way of life.

    BTW I am using the term colony as a euphemism as I am sure you are well aware. . What I mean is it will be run by USA corporations and extremely closely aligned like many of our pseudo-dependents.

    Do you ever go to any successful countries or are you just spreading continued misery wherever you go?

    I'd match up my prediction rate with your ranting any day sweetheart.

    Dec 18th, 2015 - 02:41 pm 0
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