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Montevideo, November 13th 2018 - 23:04 UTC

García-Margallo claims “confidential” talks on co-sovereignty with Gibraltar personalities

Friday, October 21st 2016 - 08:06 UTC
Full article 9 comments
“Conversations have already started, but of course they are absolutely confidential and what they aim to do is establish what the scenarios are” said García Margallo “Conversations have already started, but of course they are absolutely confidential and what they aim to do is establish what the scenarios are” said García Margallo
Chief Minister Fabian Picardo said that Spain remains the only stumbling block to the UK negotiating a different Brexit solution for Gibraltar Chief Minister Fabian Picardo said that Spain remains the only stumbling block to the UK negotiating a different Brexit solution for Gibraltar

Spain’s caretaker Minister for Foreign Affairs, José Manuel García-Margallo, claimed that he had held “confidential” talks on co-sovereignty with “personalities” in Gibraltar. However the minister gave no indication as to who he had spoken to, according to Spanish press reports.

 “Those conversations have already started, but of course they are absolutely confidential and what they aim to do is establish what the scenarios are,” he reportedly said, according to Efe, Spain´s official news agency.

He made the claim during a lunchtime event at the Club Siglo XXI, where he again insisted that joint sovereignty was Gibraltar’s only option to retain access to the EU. That position has been firmly rejected by the Gibraltar Government, which says other alternatives are possible.

In effect Chief Minister Fabian Picardo said that Spain remains the only stumbling block to the UK negotiating a different Brexit solution for Gibraltar

In making the statement Mr Picardo, speaking on Canal Sur television, rejected the position set out by acting Foreign Minister García-Margallo, during a visit to the Campo on Tuesday. He argued that it would be “impossible” for Gibraltar to retain any of the EU freedoms once the UK was out.

“I don’t agree with the minister when he says that a colony of a third country cannot access the EU market or freedom of movement,” Mr Picardo said.

“Look at Andorra, Lichtenstein, Monaco and San Marino. All are outside the EU, they are not members, but they enjoy agreements of association, freedom of movement, market access and so on.”

“I’m not saying Gibraltar should become a member of the European Union,” he added.

“What I’m saying is that in the UK’s exit, the agreement reached in relation to Gibraltar should continue to give us access to the single market and freedom of movement.”

“These things are not impossible.” Mr Picardo said that he had spoken to numerous officials in Brussels and representatives from other EU countries and “…all agreed that it was possible…”

“The only problem is Spain, which insists that the price is sovereignty,” he added.

During a lengthy interview, Mr Picardo reflected on the trilateral forum and how it had proven that it was possible to set aside sovereignty in the interests of dialogue and cooperation. But he said Gibraltar was “absolutely not” willing to pay for EU access by accepting Spain’s co-sovereignty proposal, adding that for Spain to impose that demand showed a lack of respect.

Categories: Politics, International.

Top Comments

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  • Idlehands

    Wow - Spain are finally talking directly to Gibraltarians. Isn't that against one of their main strategies to keep it between Madrid and London while ignoring them?

    Oct 21st, 2016 - 08:21 am +2
  • Brit Bob

    Tell us about Spain's Gibraltar sovereignty claim Margallo...

    Is that the non existent claim?

    https://www.academia.edu/10575180/Gibraltar_-_Some_Relevant_International_Law

    Oct 21st, 2016 - 09:36 am +2
  • sceptic64

    So 'confidential' that he can't tell us who he is talking to, and has been asked to name them by politicians in Gibraltar.

    Sr. Margallo: Hint: having a joke about it in the street with Jose, who is Spanish but who works carrying bricks around on a Gibraltar building site doesn't count as 'confidential discussions with personalities about co-sovereignty'.

    That is, of course, assuming that the entity he was talking to was human, rather than a macaque.

    Oct 21st, 2016 - 12:29 pm +2
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