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Montevideo, September 23rd 2018 - 20:12 UTC

Brazilian police killed an average of nine people per day during 2015

Thursday, November 3rd 2016 - 09:35 UTC
Full article 5 comments
In 2015, 3,345 people were allegedly killed during “police interventions” across Brazil, up 6.3% from the previous year's count of 3,146 In 2015, 3,345 people were allegedly killed during “police interventions” across Brazil, up 6.3% from the previous year's count of 3,146
Last year, Brazilian police killed more people every seven days than UK police have killed in shootings over the past 26 years. Last year, Brazilian police killed more people every seven days than UK police have killed in shootings over the past 26 years.

An average of nine people were killed per day at the hands of Brazil's notoriously violent police force in 2015, an increase from last year despite a nationwide drop in murder rates. In 2015, 3,345 people were allegedly killed during “police interventions” across Brazil, up 6.3% from the previous year's count of 3,146. The statistics come from the 10th Public Security Yearbook published by the Brazilian Forum on Public Security.

 In contrast, the number of civil and military police who died in “confrontations” tallied 393, down from 409 in 2014. The majority of such cases occurred when the security agents were off duty, while those killed during service amounted to 103 in 2015.

The data shows that last year, 8.5 times more civilians were killed by police -- including by agents who were off-duty -- than the number of police officials who died in clashes. Yet while police-related killings rose, the overall murder rate in Brazil dropped by a small margin of 1.2%, from 59,086 violent deaths in 2014 to 58,383 in 2015.

Brazil's police have long held the ill-gotten reputation of being among the most brutal institutions of its kind in the world. Its security agents came under scrutiny earlier this year when Rio de Janeiro hosted the Olympic Games. A bolstered security presence in the city was allegedly accompanied by greater police brutality, but did little to improve the safety situation in the long-term. According to a Human Rights Watch report, police killings in Rio state rose from 400 in 2013, to 645 in 2015.

Some security policies have worsened the problem. Rio's eight-year-old “pacification” strategy, in which police forces occupy the city's slums, has been criticized for excess violence and human rights abuses.

Placing the recent figures into the global context reveals just how staggering Brazil's numbers are: Last year, Brazilian police killed more people every seven days than UK police have killed in shootings over the past 26 years. In the most-affected Brazilian states, such as Amapá in the north and Rio de Janeiro in the southeast, the rate of police-related killings alone is higher than the overall murder rate of the United States (approximately 4.9 per 100.000).

In the United States, where excessive use of force by security personnel has received a vast aomunt of attention in recent years, more than 1,100 people were reportedly killed by police in 2015. The United States' population is 55% larger than Brazil's.

Categories: Politics, Brazil.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • DemonTree

    Do you think every crime deserves the death penalty with no trial?

    Nov 03rd, 2016 - 04:50 pm +1
  • DemonTree

    Criminals have more rights? Apparently 3,345 'criminals' did not have the right to life last year. Do you really want the police to be able to kill with impunity? Are they never mistaken, and never corrupt in Brazil?

    I don't think having the police arbitrarily shoot more suspects is actually the way to a more efficient and effective justice system anyway. In any case, is crime even getting worse? The article said the murder rate has actually gone down slightly.

    Nov 03rd, 2016 - 11:44 pm +1
  • :o))

    REF: Brazilian police killed an average of nine people per day:

    IF these are the criminals; it's OK! The average MUST increase!

    Nov 03rd, 2016 - 01:54 pm -1
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