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Montevideo, October 17th 2017 - 22:11 UTC

Two thirds of UK young people fearful of post-Brexit prospects

Thursday, September 14th 2017 - 17:36 UTC
Full article 9 comments
Many of those interviewed were still “angry and emotional” about last year's vote to leave the EU Many of those interviewed were still “angry and emotional” about last year's vote to leave the EU
The poll contracted by the British Council notes that, while 69% of young people who voted were in favor of remaining, about half did not vote. The poll contracted by the British Council notes that, while 69% of young people who voted were in favor of remaining, about half did not vote.
Of those polled, six in 10 said they would vote to remain if another referendum was held now. Of those polled, six in 10 said they would vote to remain if another referendum was held now.

More than two-thirds of young people in the UK have an “international outlook” and many fear for their prospects once the UK leaves the EU, says a report. Ipsos Mori questioned a representative group of almost 2,000 18 to 30-year-olds for a study by cross-party think tank Demos, for the British Council.

 Overall, young people said they feel “overburdened” by responsibility and “multiple barriers”, says the report. Ministers said schools worked hard to prepare pupils for life in a modern UK.

The report is part of the British Council's Next Generation series of studies of young people in countries facing pivotal change - others include reports on Bangladesh, Ukraine, Colombia, Turkey and South Africa. Alongside the survey, the researchers held focus groups and workshops with young people across the UK.

Many of those interviewed were still “angry and emotional” about last year's vote to leave the EU but the report notes that, while 69% of young people who voted were in favor of remaining, about half did not vote.

Of those polled, six in 10 said they would vote to remain if another referendum was held now.

“While there are certainly those who see leaving the EU as a great opportunity, many participants in our focus groups were worried about impacts on their lives, prospects and future plans, including constraining opportunities to work and study in other countries,” says the report.

“Furthermore there was some concern that internationally the UK will be seen as a country looking inwards at a time when global co-operation has never been more important.”

But almost a quarter said they had been unable to experience any form of international engagement, whether learning a foreign language or living and studying abroad.

The report found divisions along socio-economic, educational and regional lines, with young Britons from poorer families, with lower educational attainment and parents without degrees, far less likely to be positive about globalization or to have an international outlook.

The same was true for those from the North of England and the Midlands compared with London and the South.

The report also found many were frustrated with an education system they saw as overly focused on grades rather than life skills like money management, healthy eating, mental health and relationships.

About half felt their education had failed to properly prepare them for the world of work or for adulthood generally. Many felt constrained by a lack of affordable housing, limited career opportunities and poor pay and conditions.

Lead author Ian Wybron said: “Our research confirms that many young adults feel frustrated with an education system and labor market that doesn't work for them - and the young advisers behind this project urge the government to take steps to redress inequality of opportunity.

”Young adults want reassurances that government will work to maintain and grow opportunities for young people to connect abroad and not just for the usual suspects who do so already.“

A spokesman for the Department for Education said: ”We have been clear that Britain should always remain a truly outward looking, global nation. Schools already prepare pupils for life in modern Britain by teaching them the knowledge, skills and values they need to fulfill their potential.

Categories: Economy, Politics, International.

Top Comments

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  • Lightning

    démontrée

    feminine singular of a pretentious condescending Londoner

    Sep 15th, 2017 - 02:46 pm +2
  • Lightning

    These same cynical and entitled “youths”
    who didn't vote or held the referendum in contempt, are now upset at the result of the democratic process.

    Too bad.

    Just like the enlightened Londoners who accuse the rest of England of being ignorant and fringe-dwelling xenophobes.

    Suck it up - you're in the minority.

    Sep 14th, 2017 - 10:29 pm +1
  • Clyde15

    There are approx. 7.8 million in this age group. 2000 is 0.0256%. So they extrapolate from this that “5.2 million feel fearful about leaving the EU.
    An even larger percentage probably feel fearful about leaving home!

    I think casting the runes would be as valuable as many of these ”reports”

    Sep 15th, 2017 - 09:10 pm +1
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