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Montevideo, September 26th 2018 - 14:54 UTC

Half of the world population without health services, says WHO/World Bank report

Monday, December 18th 2017 - 13:47 UTC
Full article 2 comments
“It is completely unacceptable that half the world still lacks coverage for the most essential health services,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, head of WHO. Reuters “It is completely unacceptable that half the world still lacks coverage for the most essential health services,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, head of WHO. Reuters
”Universal health coverage (UHC) allows everyone to obtain the health services they need, when and where they need them, without facing financial hardship.” ”Universal health coverage (UHC) allows everyone to obtain the health services they need, when and where they need them, without facing financial hardship.”

At least half of the world’s population cannot obtain essential health services, according to a new report from the World Bank and WHO. And each year, large numbers of households are being pushed into poverty because they must pay for health care out of their own pockets.

 Currently, 800 million people spend at least 10% of their household budgets on health expenses for themselves, a sick child or other family member. For almost 100 million people these expenses are high enough to push them into extreme poverty, forcing them to survive on just US$1.90 or less a day. The findings, released in Tracking Universal Health Coverage: 2017 Global Monitoring Report, have been simultaneously published in Lancet Global Health.

“It is completely unacceptable that half the world still lacks coverage for the most essential health services,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO. ”And it is unnecessary. A solution exists: universal health coverage (UHC) allows everyone to obtain the health services they need, when and where they need them, without facing financial hardship.“

”The report makes clear that if we are serious – not just about better health outcomes, but also about ending poverty – we must urgently scale up our efforts on universal health coverage,“ said World Bank Group President Dr. Jim Yong Kim.

”Investments in health, and more generally investments in people, are critical to build human capital and enable sustainable and inclusive economic growth. But the system is broken: we need a fundamental shift in the way we mobilize resources for health and human capital, especially at the country level. We are working on many fronts to help countries spend more and more effectively on people, and increase their progress towards universal health coverage.”

There is some good news: The report shows that the 21st century has seen an increase in the number of people able to obtain some key health services, such as immunization and family planning, as well as antiretroviral treatment for HIV and insecticide-treated bed nets to prevent malaria. In addition, fewer people are now being tipped into extreme poverty than at the turn of the century.

In some regions, basic health care services such as family planning and infant immunization are becoming more available, but lack of financial protection means increasing financial distress for families as they pay for these services out of their own pockets. This is even a challenge in more affluent regions such as Eastern Asia, Latin America and Europe, where a growing number of people are spending at least 10% of their household budgets on out-of-pocket health expenses. Inequalities in health services are seen not just between, but also within countries: national averages can mask low levels of health service coverage in disadvantaged population groups. For example, only 17% of mothers and children in the poorest fifth of households in low- and lower-middle income countries received at least six of seven basic maternal and child health interventions, compared to 74 percent for the wealthiest fifth of households.

The report is a key point of discussion at the global Universal Health Coverage Forum 2017, which was addressed in Tokyo, Japan. Convened by the Government of Japan, a leading supporter of UHC domestically and globally, the Forum is cosponsored by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), UHC2030, the leading global movement advocating for UHC, UNICEF, the World Bank, and WHO.

Top Comments

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  • golfcronie

    Health Care is a basic human right. Tell that to the dictators and hangersons about it. Most African states are run by despots stealing foreign aid to line their own pockets.

    Dec 18th, 2017 - 10:45 pm +1
  • Pytangua

    And that includes 50 million US citizens who are also denied access to basic medical care in the most powerful country in the world. What a great advert for capitalism!

    Dec 23rd, 2017 - 04:24 pm 0
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