MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, November 21st 2018 - 21:08 UTC

Members of Temer's entourage arrested in bribe probe

Saturday, March 31st 2018 - 21:33 UTC
Full article 12 comments

Three people linked to Brazi's President Michel Temer were arrested Thursday in the investigation of a decree the head of state allegedly signed to benefit a port company in exchange for bribes. Read full article

Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • DemonTree

    “considering running in next October's elections”

    Ignoring the fact that he promised not to - because I'm sure he will - the guy is less popular than syphilis. What's the point?

    Given how close the investigations are getting to him, what Temer *should* be considering is which country without an extradition treaty he'd prefer to retire to.

    Apr 01st, 2018 - 12:00 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @DT:

    REF: “what Temer *should* be considering is which country without an extradition treaty he'd prefer to retire to.”:

    For ALL the corrupt; Brazil IS the SAFEST country, where they WILL remain in “Proxy Power”- FOREVER!

    Apr 01st, 2018 - 11:42 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    You could be right. Well, except Lula. He may or may not go to jail, but I doubt he's going to be able to run in the election.

    Apr 01st, 2018 - 01:21 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Enrique Massot

    This new development in Brazil's “corruption” saga appears to be a tactic move to stop Temer, who is at the lowest popularity levels (about 1.3 per cent) from foolishly attempting to run in the coming election. Of course, the powers that be require a candidate with some chances--and Temer's ambition may get on the way of their plans.

    These developments also signal increasing worries of Brazil elites in regards to the October presidential election. Their conundrum stems from the absolute majority of vote intention, precisely for the candidate they are committed to stop from running.

    “If Lula isn't allowed to run, a record 32 percent of Brazilians say they will not vote for any candidate - a sign of unprecedented disenchantment with the nation's scandal-plagued politicians,” noted Euronews in February.

    As a result, rumblings of suspension of the election and even of a military coup d'état are circulating as Brazil's privileged mull how to keep the state apparatus “where it belongs.”

    http://www.euronews.com/2018/02/01/brazil-lula-leads-presidential-election-poll-despite-corruption-conviction

    Apr 01st, 2018 - 03:18 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @DT:

    REF: “I doubt he's going to be able to run in the election”:

    Please consider the following:
    - The rest of the corrupt may lose courage and
    - they may consider him as “Not Guilty” and thus
    - By sheer popularity amongst the majority; he still could

    In the worst case scenario;
    - His stooge may become the next president,
    - so virtually/indirectly, he may still rule the country
    - he may be able to make a dramatic come-back after 4 more years.
    OR:
    The OLD crooks will be replaced by NEW crooks

    Apr 01st, 2018 - 05:48 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @EM
    Who are these 'powers that be'? If Temer's party don't want him standing, they can pick another candidate, and the other parties have their own hopefuls who they would surely prefer to win. But none of them are very popular anyway, even with Lula out of the running. It's unlikely to make a difference whether Temer runs or not.

    And why do you suppose these elites are only moving against Lula now? He already served 2 full terms, and Dilma was on her second when she was booted out. Did they not care about 'keeping the state apparatus where it belongs' for 13 years?

    @ :o))
    Maybe they should reconsider, since if they don't get Lula they may well end up with Bolsonaro; no centrist candidate could rise above single digit popularity last time I looked.

    Apr 01st, 2018 - 06:43 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @DT:

    REF: “if they don't get Lula they may well end up with Bolsonaro”:

    Or ANY wolf under a sheep's clothing! Crooked as “THEY” are; they must ALSO be considered as clowns - a LAUGHING MATTER!:
    https://linhaslivres.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/charge-do-duke-no-jornal-o-tempo-de-bh-mg.jpg

    Apr 02nd, 2018 - 01:24 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Enrique Massot

    @DT

    The real power in Latin America countries -- as in other parts of the world -- is often not in the president's hands but in those with economic power, control on the media, the judiciary and at times the legislature.

    Elected presidents are highly conditioned when they take office, and often their political survival depends on whether they become a real threat to the elites' privileges.

    I do not believe those elites are only now moving against Lula. They just do their moves whenever they see chances of success.

    The interesting situation today is, the rich and powerful do need a candidate who is more or less credible--all because those stubborn electors still prefer Lula in spite of all the judges' “diligence.”

    Apr 02nd, 2018 - 08:16 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @EM:

    REF: “I do not believe those elites are only now moving against Lula. They just do their moves whenever they see chances of success”:

    All it boils down to the SURVIVAL of the fittest!
    REF:
    https://i1.wp.com/www.blogdomadeira.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/charge_neo.jpg?zoom=0.8999999761581421&resize=300%2C290

    Apr 03rd, 2018 - 01:14 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @EM
    Why would they move against Lula at all? He was pretty radical in his youth, but not by the time he got elected. He isn't CFK, he extended the BF and introduced other subsidies to help the poor, but his financial policies seem to have been pretty moderate to me. Plus those employment laws that Temer reformed, and the pension rules he wants to change were not brought in by the PT. Any of the presidents before Lula could have changed them, but perhaps it did not seem necessary then?

    What changed is the recession, and the corruption scandal, and I think the combination of the two is what lead to Dilma losing support and being impeached on a pretext. The rich in Brazil don't want a recession any more than the poor do, surely? And the politicians don't want the corruption investigations to continue, because corruption is nearly universal in the Brazilian congress. Hence the vote to remove Dilma.

    Of course, that also makes it nearly impossible for any of those candidates to get elected, because everyone must suspect they were involved.

    Apr 03rd, 2018 - 06:15 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    It's time to make it mandatory that the candidates MUST have at least some experience in corruption! Otherwise, there wouldn't be any election for the want of candidates!
    REF:
    http://www.montanhascapixabas.com.br/fotos/Coluna%20Pol%C3%ADtica%20e%20Poder%20-%20Imagens/Charge%20-%20Verbas.jpg

    Apr 03rd, 2018 - 10:21 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Lord Lucan

    12345 12345

    Apr 06th, 2018 - 10:24 pm - Link - Report abuse 0

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!