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Montevideo, November 21st 2017 - 19:26 UTC

Tag: British Antarctic Survey (BAS)

  • Tuesday, October 10th 2017 - 02:20 UTC

    New map of South Georgia by British Antarctic Survey unveiled

    The sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia is a haven for wildlife, a centre for wildlife and fisheries research and famous for the epic voyage by Sir Ernest Shackleton and his men.

    A team of cartographers at British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has re-produced a high-resolution updated map of the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia. The island, situated at 37°W 54°10’S is a haven for wildlife, a centre for wildlife and fisheries research and famous for the epic voyage by Sir Ernest Shackleton and his men just over a century ago.

  • Sunday, May 14th 2017 - 00:03 UTC

    UK/Uruguay confirm Antarctic cooperation with Montevideo visit of two BAS research vessels

    Icebreaker RRS James Clark Ross and RRS Shackleton coincided in Montevideo port  at the end of the Antarctic season

    Two British scientific research vessels coincided in Montevideo in early May at the end of the Antarctic season, in their way back to Southampton. Icebreaker RRS Shackleton and RRS James Clark Ross with sophisticated scientific research equipment and tens of experts in different disciplines spent months in Antarctica and returned to Montevideo, a traditional call port the British Antarctic Survey, BAS.

  • Friday, March 10th 2017 - 07:21 UTC

    BAS scientific research survey of South Georgia fish resources

    Dr Mark Belchier holds a Patagonian toothfish (Pic BAS)

    Every two years BAS leads a scientific research survey of the fish resources on behalf of the Government of South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands. This time Dr. Mark Belchier from BAS was head of the team of experts that carried out the survey.

  • Monday, February 20th 2017 - 21:27 UTC

    South Georgia gentoo penguins feed preferably on krill, shows 22 year BAS study

    The team, based at BAS, found that between 1989 and 2010 gentoo penguins ate approximately equal amounts of crustaceans, (mainly Antarctic krill) and fish. (Pic BAS)

    The longest and most comprehensive study to date of what penguins eat is published this month. The study, published in the journal Marine Biology, examines the diets of gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) at Bird Island, South Georgia over a 22 year period and is part of a project investigating the Southern Ocean ecosystem and its response to change

  • Thursday, January 19th 2017 - 20:43 UTC

    BAS will shut down Antarctica's Halley VI in winter because of ice shelf crack

    Halley VI Research Station is currently being relocated to a new site 23 kilometres ms upstream

    British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has decided not to winter at Halley VI Research Station for safety reasons. The station, which is located on the floating Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, will shut down between March and November 2017.

  • Wednesday, January 18th 2017 - 12:05 UTC

    HMS Protector recovers equipment abandoned in remote Antarctic island

    A flurry of activity saw sailors and marines attack the site with spades, saws and ice picks, freeing numerous items, including rope, skis, scaffolding and barrels

    Personnel from HMS Protector have removed equipment abandoned more than 30 years ago on a remote island in Antarctica. The ice patrol ship attempted to remove equipment three years ago from Brabant Island – the second largest island of the Palmer Archipelago within the British Antarctic Territory – but were thwarted by bad weather.

  • Saturday, November 19th 2016 - 12:02 UTC

    European scientists in Antarctica trying to locate the oldest ice on Earth

    Dr Robert Mulvaney from BAS is involved in the site survey at Little Dome C

    A team of European scientists heads to East Antarctica this month to locate the oldest ice on Earth. The team is part of an EU-funded research consortium from ten European countries whose aim is to search for a suitable site to drill an ice core to capture 1.5 million years of Earth’s climate history.

  • Tuesday, November 1st 2016 - 14:21 UTC

    Gentoo penguins proving to be the sturdiest in Antarctica

    Chinstraps have been in steady decline while gentoos have undergone a series of population fluctuations…although their over trend is upwards

    A forty year study on a remote Antarctic island shows that while populations of two penguin species are declining, while a third is increasing. Analysis of census data from Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands reveals that, between 1978 and 2016, the number of chinstrap penguin pairs declined by nearly 70%.

  • Monday, October 17th 2016 - 06:28 UTC

    Uruguayan scientists on HMS Protector en route to Antarctica for a joint research project

    Federico Weinstein and Carolina Rodríguez are travelling on HMS Protector on a scientific cruise to Antarctica (Pics; British Embassy Uruguay)

    Two Uruguayan young scientists are on board Ice Patrol HMS Protector en route to the Falkland Islands and Antarctica and will be participating in a research program on human impact on the Antarctic marine environment including pollution mainly by plastic made products. Federico Weinstein and Carolina Rodríguez belong to the Faculty of Sciences and represent the resumption of long standing links between the Ice Patrol and Montevideo.

  • Tuesday, August 9th 2016 - 22:18 UTC

    Seabirds threatened by by-catches, pollutants and climate change, according to BAS research

    Lead author Dr Richard Phillips from BAS says seabirds become hooked on baited hooks, trapped in nets or collide with warp cables, when scavenging for food

    A review of breeding distributions, population trends, threats and key priorities for conservation actions on land and at sea for the 29 species covered by the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) has been published in the journal Biological Conservation. It reveals increased conservation efforts are required in order to secure a sustainable future for albatrosses and large petrels.

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