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The three challenges faced by Latinamerica democracies, according to OAS

Thursday, October 11th 2012 - 04:59 UTC
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Democracy is not only going to vote every four years, said Insulza Democracy is not only going to vote every four years, said Insulza

Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS), José Miguel Insulza, said on Wednesday at the opening ceremony of the Third Latin American Democracy Forum in Mexico City, that “at present the democracies of Latin America and the Caribbean face three major risks to their integrity: inequality, organized crime, and the lack of dialogue between political actors”.

“These are aspects of democracy that need improvement, because they put at risk the very existence of democracy, but I think that with time they will be overcome,” said the leader of the OAS.

The Third Latin American Democracy Forum, entitled ”Democracy and crisis of representation: who wins the election, wins the power?” is organized by the OAS, the Federal Electoral Institute of Mexico (IFE), International IDEA and the College of Mexico and will run until Friday, October 12, at the headquarters of the College.

Also speaking during the opening session were Javier Garciadiego, President of the College of Mexico; Vidar Helgesen, Secretary General of International IDEA; IFE President Leonardo Valdes; and Ernesto Cordero, President of the Mexican Senate.

On the issue of inequality the Secretary General said that “a democratic society, in which all individuals have equal political rights nominally, is incompatible with the degree of inequality that exists in our countries in economic and social terms.”

He added that “in this regard the income issue is critical.” As an example, he compared the income distribution system in Europe and Latin America and the Caribbean: “While in Europe, before and after-tax the distribution of income improves by 12 percentage points, in our region before and after taxes the income distribution is almost the same,” he said.

Insulza talked about the risk represented by the growing influence of organized crime in some regions of the Americas. “It is also incompatible in a democratic society the existence of groups acting outside the framework of the law, which are governed by their own rules, have their own forces, and even have the chance to take control of territories within the democratic state.”

Among advances in this field, Insulza mentioned the peace process of the gangs of El Salvador, in which the OAS played an important role. ”The truce between the two main maras (gangs) has been important, because the murder rate has dropped to less than half. We are talking about 1,600 fewer young people killed this year during the night battles of San Salvador,“ he said. ”This means that organized crime groups have an impact on society far greater than we can imagine, and this is also incompatible with democracy,“ he added.

Finally Insulza explained how the lack of political dialogue significantly affects the functioning of the democratic system. ”Democracy is not only going to vote every four years, is not only the meetings of democratic institutions, but it is the forging of networks of trust that enable all citizens to feel part of the same institutions, the same nation,“ he said.

To Insulza, ”in many of our countries, that dialogue has been replaced - whether by the facts or by way of political confrontation - by the existence of tight divisions that turns every democratic election into almost a last resort, and that is not good for democracy either.“

”In democracy, the best is when winning candidates take office and those who do not win do not feel excluded from the electoral system, and do not feel that society and democracy do not represent them,” concluded the OAS Secretary General.

 

Categories: Politics, Latin America.

Top Comments

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  • MurkyThink

    OAS should hand its exhortations to USA not to Latin America countries.

    Oct 11th, 2012 - 01:49 pm 0
  • BAMF Paraguay

    He forgot to mention the rise in dictators.

    Oct 11th, 2012 - 02:03 pm 0
  • ChrisR

    “at present the democracies of Latin America and the Caribbean face three major risks to their integrity: inequality, organized crime, and the lack of dialogue between political actors”.

    AND, he should have added, their integrity, because most of them do not have any.

    Oct 11th, 2012 - 02:03 pm 0
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