MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, September 19th 2018 - 22:39 UTC

Public opinion forces Temer to withdraw troops from streets of Brasilia

Thursday, May 25th 2017 - 20:27 UTC
Full article 25 comments
The deployment of soldiers shocked a capital already shaken by the day's violence and an investigation into corruption allegations against the president. The deployment of soldiers shocked a capital already shaken by the day's violence and an investigation into corruption allegations against the president.
Temer earlier insisted the deployment was carried out under the constitution. But the issue of troops is sensitive in a country that lived under military rule 1964-1985. Temer earlier insisted the deployment was carried out under the constitution. But the issue of troops is sensitive in a country that lived under military rule 1964-1985.
Critics interpreted the troop deployment as a sign of desperation by a president under pressure. Critics interpreted the troop deployment as a sign of desperation by a president under pressure.
Columnist Maria Cristina Fernandes in economic daily Valor described it as “the last chance for a show of authority by a government that is finished.” Columnist Maria Cristina Fernandes in economic daily Valor described it as “the last chance for a show of authority by a government that is finished.”

Brazil's President Michel Temer called troops back off the streets of the capital Thursday after deploying them to guard government buildings following riots by protesters demanding he quit. A decree published online in the official journal said the president had revoked an earlier measure to deploy 1,500 federal troops -- a delicate issue in a country with living memory of a military dictatorship.

 Soldiers shortly afterwards began to withdraw from around government buildings which they had spent the night guarding in Brasilia. Protesters had smashed their way into ministries and fought with riot police on Wednesday in some of the most violent scenes yet in a year of political turbulence.

The deployment of soldiers shocked a capital already shaken by the day's violence and an investigation into corruption allegations against the president.

Temer earlier insisted the deployment was carried out under the constitution. But the issue of troops is sensitive in a country that lived under military rule from 1964-1985.

Conservative former vice-president Temer stepped up to replace populist president Dilma Rousseff last year. She was impeached for illegally manipulating government accounts, but said the charges were politically trumped-up. Now Temer faces impeachment requests from his own political rivals.

Critics interpreted the troop deployment as a sign of desperation by a president under pressure.

Columnist Maria Cristina Fernandes in economic daily Valor described it as “the last chance for a show of authority by a government that is finished.”

Violence erupted on Wednesday after a crowd of demonstrators, estimated by police at 35,000, marched toward the presidential palace, which is flanked by Congress and the government buildings.

Most of the protesters were peaceful but small groups wearing masks threw stones at police and smashed their way into the agriculture ministry and reportedly also the culture and planning ministries.

Riot police crouching behind black shields lobbed tear gas and stun grenades into the crowd. When protesters set a fire in the agriculture ministry, employees were forced to flee, a spokesman for the ministry said.

In the lower house of Congress, the session was temporarily suspended after opposition deputies took over the speaker's podium, brandishing signs saying “Temer out.”

According to a count released by authorities, 49 people were injured and seven detained in the protests.

Leftist groups and trade unions organized the protests a week after Temer was placed under a corruption probe. They are demanding his resignation and an end to austerity reforms centered on cuts to the pension system.

Temer insists the austerity reforms are already working and that more measures, especially pension reform, are needed. Stuck in deep recession for two years, Latin America's biggest economy is just now showing the first signs of returning to growth, although unemployment stands at nearly 14%.

Categories: Politics, Brazil.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • :o))

    REF: “The deployment of soldiers shocked a capital”:
    #1: Nobody was shocked due to the heavy damage to the public & private properties.
    #2: The deployment of soldiers took place only when it was already too late.
    #3: So what's the next joke?

    May 26th, 2017 - 11:29 am 0
  • Jack Bauer

    The next joke is the fact that in 2015, the fat b*tch also employed the armed forces to protect areas in which the events of the Olympic Games were taking place, and no one batted an eyelid....it's always the same with the radical left, if it's not their idea, they must fight it,, no matter what, even if their actions are against the interests of the people...to them, it's “WE, the party, are more important than anything else.”

    May 26th, 2017 - 03:37 pm 0
  • DemonTree

    @JB
    It's a different context. Using the army against rioters/protesters is a lot more similar to the actions of the dictatorship. And the fact that things have got so bad already is not a good sign for Temer.

    If he's impeached too then who is likely to get the job next?

    May 26th, 2017 - 09:44 pm 0
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!