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Montevideo, September 22nd 2018 - 07:31 UTC

Theresa May puts tackling suspected terrorists above human rights laws

Wednesday, June 7th 2017 - 06:26 UTC
Full article 6 comments
“Restrict the freedom and movements of terrorist suspects when we have enough evidence to know they are a threat, but not enough evidence to prosecute them” “Restrict the freedom and movements of terrorist suspects when we have enough evidence to know they are a threat, but not enough evidence to prosecute them”
Jeremy Corbyn said the right response was to “halt the Conservative cuts and invest in our police and security services and protect our democratic values” Jeremy Corbyn said the right response was to “halt the Conservative cuts and invest in our police and security services and protect our democratic values”

UK Prime Minister Theresa May has said she will change human rights laws if they “get in the way” of tackling suspected terrorists. The PM said she would make it easier to deport foreign terror suspects and “restrict the freedom and movements” of those that present a threat. Labour said it was “not the message that we should be sending”.

 Security has dominated the final days of the general election campaign after the terror attacks in London and Manchester. Rival parties have been criticising the Tories over police cuts.

Speaking after the London attack, Mrs. May said “enough is enough” and that “things need to change” in the terror fight. Addressing activists in Slough on Tuesday evening, she did not make any specific new policy proposals but said: “I mean longer prison sentences for those convicted of terrorist offences.

”I mean making it easier for the authorities to deport foreign terrorist suspects back to their own countries. And I mean doing more to restrict the freedom and movements of terrorist suspects when we have enough evidence to know they are a threat, but not enough evidence to prosecute them in full in court.

“And if our human rights laws get in the way of doing it, we will change the law so we can do it.” In an interview with The Sun, Mrs. May said she would also consider extending the time suspects can be held without charge to 28 days, after it was reduced to 14 days in 2011 under the coalition.

“We said there may be circumstances where it is necessary to do this. I will listen to what they [the police and security services] think is necessary for us to do,” she said.

The Conservative manifesto committed to remaining in the European Convention on Human Rights - which is separate to the EU - for the whole of the next Parliament. Conservative sources said they would not withdraw from the ECHR but would seek opt-outs called “derogations” from certain aspects.

Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn said the right response was to “halt the Conservative cuts and invest in our police and security services and protect our democratic values, including the Human Rights Act.”

And Shadow Attorney General Baroness Chakrabarti said the PM had “been banging on about her dislike for human rights for a very long time”. She told Newsnight Labour's commitment was to deal with terror suspects within the rule of law and the human rights framework. “Our biggest concern is about resources,” she said.

Categories: Politics, International.

Top Comments

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  • golfcronie

    Exactly right, my human right is to walk down the street in safety and not be attacked by some Islamic maniac.My human rights are affected by these nutters

    Jun 07th, 2017 - 04:43 pm +1
  • DemonTree

    This is just what I was afraid of. She's been wanting to roll back human rights laws for a long time, now Brexit has given her the means and terrorists have given her the opportunity. Imprisonment without trial has been banned in the UK since the Magna Carta, and now May wants to bring it back because it's cheaper and easier than employing more police.

    And people like golfcronie support it because they don't imagine they or their family and friends will be the ones imprisoned for a month without charge or subjected to punishment without trial, and who cares what happens to Muslims anyway?

    Jun 07th, 2017 - 05:59 pm 0
  • Don Alberto

    Yes, Imprisonment without trial has been banned in the UK since the Magna Carta, yet used extensively against members of the IRA.

    Jun 08th, 2017 - 05:21 am 0
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