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Montevideo, October 20th 2017 - 17:42 UTC

Mercosur foreign ministers will discuss the Venezuela situation in Brazil

Saturday, August 5th 2017 - 07:55 UTC
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Brazilian foreign minister Aloysio Nunes, will host the meeting when Mercosur will decide if to implement, or not, the Democratic Clause Brazilian foreign minister Aloysio Nunes, will host the meeting when Mercosur will decide if to implement, or not, the Democratic Clause
Senator Collor de Melo will head a committee that will attempt “congressional diplomacy” hopefully bringing together Venezuelan government and opposition. Senator Collor de Melo will head a committee that will attempt “congressional diplomacy” hopefully bringing together Venezuelan government and opposition.
Uruguayan president Tabare Vazquez said he was “deeply concerned” with events in Venezuela Uruguayan president Tabare Vazquez said he was “deeply concerned” with events in Venezuela

Mercosur foreign ministers are scheduled to meet this Saturday in Sao Paulo to decide on to how to address latest events in Venezuela, the fifth member of the group which remains suspended, and so far has not replied to calls to cancel the constituent assembly procedure and attempt some form of dialogue with the political opposition.

 Brazilian foreign minister Aloysio Nunes, whose country currently holds the six month rotating chair of Mercosur anticipated it was prepared to consider implementing the Democratic Clause, which would mean the definitive suspension of Venezuela from the South American block, given its repeated violation of human rights, non compliance with democratic principles or the rule of the law and holding political prisoners.

Brazil believes this last week's events with the election of 545 members to the Venezuelan Constituent assembly, apparently rigged, plus its inauguration on Friday, ignoring the National assembly, has only made things far worse.

In a release the Brazilian foreign ministry said it had repeatedly exhorted president Nicolas Maduro to suspend the election, and questioned the Constituent assembly since it “violates the right to universal vote, ignores the principle of popular sovereignty and confirms the rupture of the constitutional order”.

Of Mercosur four founding members, Argentina and Paraguay simply want Venezuela expulsed from the group, while Uruguay has had a more reluctant attitude insisting in promoting some form of dialogue and believing that with Venezuela outside there's not much chance of reversing the situation.

Although foreign minister Nin Novoa stated that rounding up members of the opposition and the killings in the streets of Venezuela was “disastrous”, and president Tabare Vazquez said he was “concerned” about the latest events, it is not sure what the position of Uruguay is going to be in Sao Paulo. This week the Argentine foreign minister Jorge Faurie was in Montevideo trying to convince his counterpart to support the Argentine stance when they meet in Brazil.

Meanwhile the Brazilian Senate approved naming a committee, headed by Senator and ex president Fernando Collor de Mello to facilitate dialogue between the Venezuelan government and the opposition.

“It is evident we do not pretend to solve the crisis of Venezuela, but Brazil can't stand on a side while other countries from other continents are trying to help with the process”, said Collor de Melo

The Senate foreign affairs committee approved the committee with the intention of traveling to Venezuela even when no dates were advanced. Previously there will be contacts with the Brazilian foreign ministry, which last month sent its ambassador back to Caracas despite bilateral relations have been frozen for quite some time.

Collor de Melo said the committee will be totally neutral in the conflict and is hopeful that congressional diplomacy will help to bring together the government and the opposition to a discussions' table.

The sponsor of the initiative is Jorge Viana, a leading member of the Senate who warned about the risks of civil war in Venezuela since “there is no dialogue, tolerance or understanding between sides”

Brazil who shares a border with Venezuela has seen thousands flock in originally to buy staples missing in their country, but now most of them are wanting to remain because of the ongoing instability.

Categories: Politics, Brazil, Mercosur, Venezuela.

Top Comments

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  • Jack Bauer

    At last, VZ suspended.............Better late than never......but while Madman still sits on the throne, not much will change internally.

    Aug 05th, 2017 - 05:44 pm 0
  • :o))

    For Vz, returning back to the normal tracks may be years ahead - if at all. If the politicians go on fooling around non-stop; Brazil too may not be too far from a similar [not the same] fate.

    Aug 06th, 2017 - 09:29 am 0
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