MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, November 21st 2018 - 16:39 UTC

Falklands have three new young “ambassadors”

Monday, March 5th 2018 - 11:59 UTC
Full article 46 comments

Three young people who, judging by their boundless enthusiasm for all things Falkland, could be ambassadors for the Islands after only a week in Stanley and the Camp. Mauricio Giraudo from Uruguay, Marco Franceschini from Brazil and Hristo Gomez, from Chile, are this year’s winners of a competition organized each year by the British embassies in Montevideo, Brasilia and Santiago and sponsored and financed by the Falkland Islands Government. Read full article

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  • Marcos Alejandro

    “and sponsored and financed by the Falkland Islands Government”

    Like Pascoe and Peter Pepper, MP, Roger :-) etc, etc...

    Mar 06th, 2018 - 04:10 am - Link - Report abuse -4
  • Roger Lorton

    Really Morecrap? May I assume that my cheque's in the post? LOL

    I wish.

    Mar 06th, 2018 - 06:12 am - Link - Report abuse +3
  • DemonTree

    They did give you a medal, right, Roger? But no free holiday in the Falklands for you. I wish I could win one.

    Mar 06th, 2018 - 11:39 am - Link - Report abuse +3
  • Marcos Alejandro

    Roger Lorton
    “To be fair, I had some very difficult discussions with my publishers back in the day, and lost of course. Never going to make me rich and the result was reduced circulation. It is now why I post my work for free”

    Didn't they pay you enough Roger? Stingy tightfisted English! :-))

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 04:47 am - Link - Report abuse -2
  • Capt Rockhopper

    I guess there were no entrants from Argentina, they don't want to meet islanders but just take what the islanders have.

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 05:02 am - Link - Report abuse +2
  • Jo Bloggs

    Marcos

    I'd love to see some of the the work you post for free. Send us a link and improve your publicity. I think Mike Bingham does a similar thing now.

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 08:57 am - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Patrick Edgar

    At times I wonder, just how much is Britain's political personality before other countri, reflected by what is becoming the Falkland Islands motivating force in having become anything at all.
    It seems that if Britain succeeds in avoiding its political and diplomatic debt to justice, and continues its plunder of the South Atlantic by means of this fairy tale propagandist story line script creation, and the islands do indeed some day become internationally recognized as a sovereign entity, its moto will have to be “Since 1833, born out of the will to not let Argentina have these islands” For every single activity out the Falklands these days, and every article written, has an invisible center, an unspoken enemy, a blind rock off which anything that is done on the islands pushes off from, giving life, purpose and form to everything that this new class of people living on the islands who have finally found a mission their lives, do. If Britain had not turned Argentina into the islander's silent enemy, would the islanders have wanted to do anything at all out of the land they were passively hosted on? It's obvious that this event was created with the intention of international public relations recognition. For what reason? In hopes the “cry for recognized existence” becomes louder and more proliferous than the Argentine denouncement of foul play, no doubt. Even the famous referendum uses Argentina to have some significance, yet is quiet about that also. If someone asked “Why DID the islanders have that referendum, what were they voting on?” What would they answer? ... A carefully crated reply that avoids including the word Argentina most likely.
    It's funny how the “Falkland's Lobby” tries to pass the referendum as “working democracy” Roger Lorton, referring to the the other story on Merco Press. I would like to ask then, What is the contextual argument for which the “voting” is held, and how is its other side represented? It isn't? So what gives it its purpose then?

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 02:05 pm - Link - Report abuse -4
  • Roger Lorton

    MoreCrap - are you stalking me? Quoting conversations from Twitter? Which makes no sense on here. My publishers were The Stationary Office and the day was way back in 1999, long before my gaze turned to the South Atlantic. That said, I got 12% which, it now appears, was a good rate from a publisher. The man I was talking to on Twitter has only got 5%.

    So now I've explained what you were talking about, what was the point you were attempting to make MoreCrap?

    Pat - you are still weird. Get a job. Get a life and stop talking out of your rear. And remember, you are Italian. It says so on your passport.

    The referendum? Carried out in compliance with UN resolutions. It's purpose? To tell the world what the people of the Falklands want. Went well, I thought.

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 03:21 pm - Link - Report abuse +2
  • DemonTree

    It's interesting though, I think it's true that we are as much defined by what we're not as what we are. Isn't that why teenagers rebel against their parents? And there's nothing that unites people as much as having a common enemy. It often seems the Falklands and Gibraltar are the only BOTs that actually want to be British, and maybe that's because they both have someone else to hate. Other colonies had to get their individuality by rebelling against the parent country, and then later by defining themselves as different from their neighbours.

    I suppose Pat is talking about the Islanders gaining a political consciousness, and that probably was a result of Argentina's actions, though obviously not the intended one. It makes me wonder when the settlers in South America started thinking of themselves as something separate from Spain. Napoleon's invasion of the peninsula was obviously the catalyst for all those declarations of independence, but how did the people see themselves before that?

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 04:18 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Patrick Edgar

    Roger. You're hilarious ! And stop saying lies about me in public . I am a U.S. born American, I'm much more Argentine than what I will ever be Italian, as my parents who were Argentine both, sister included, only spoke to me in Spanish, plus I partially grew up, and later lived years at a time in Argentina going to school and working there. I have lived also several times in Italy and have yes made good on Italian law thus been given my Italian citizenship... Roger, if you had any “soul” at all, you would HEAR in my debates and arguments just how Argentinian I am.
    I was not “stalking you” anywhere. ... I am the one who is being stalked by some British people on facebook no doubt, who want to shut me up, and keep looking for ancient comments by which to maintain me suspended from the network. I was referring to something you commented on a different article about some idiotic something by the American congress about the Islanders 2013 referendum being put “on the table” I thought I had found in Merco Press, but now I can't find it anymore.

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 07:19 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @Patrick
    'MoreCrap' = Marcos Alejandro. Roger was accusing Marcos of stalking him, not you. And was this the article you were looking for?

    http://en.mercopress.com/2017/12/12/falklands-election-motivates-support-resolution-in-us-house-of-representatives/comments

    Technically he didn't lie about you, either. If you have an Italian passport, then you ARE Italian. Doesn't mean you're not American also. Doesn't stop you applying for Argentine citizenship and moving there, either. Why don't you, if you feel so much more Argentine than Italian?

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 07:51 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Patrick Edgar

    @ Capt Hogwash. It doesn't really sound like it's “designed” to include Argentinians sm*** a**. Subject: “Why I would like to meet my neighbors in the Falkland Islands.” and ... “hoping will increase the spread of knowledge about the Falklands in the countries from which the competition” (Increase and spread the knowledge the FIG is interested in spreading of course) I could have won!! All I had to do is sing to the thief's ears ”I hope the Argentine see one day the Islanders wishes and self determination matters more than respecting Argentina, just as much as if it were as important a nation as France, Britain, China, America, India, Syria, Sweden, Spain, Portugal, Mexico, Australia, Iran, New Zealand, Libya, Norway, Sudan, or any oth.......... ENJOYED THE ROLLER COASTER RIDE? LOL .... Who to like?! Who to like! .... hmmmm If only all countries could just start attacking themselves already!! Life would be so much simpler for the British !

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 09:38 pm - Link - Report abuse -2
  • Marcos Alejandro

    Roger, your public posts are public for everybody to read and I find your obsession with our islands very interesting. Nice pic Roger! but don’t worry I am more interested in penguins:-)

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 10:17 pm - Link - Report abuse -2
  • DemonTree

    ¿Patrick, por qué estás tan obsesionado con Gran Bretaña?

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 10:38 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Terence Hill

    Patrick Edgar
    “avoiding its political and diplomatic debt to justice, of this fairy tale propagandist story line script creation, and the islands do indeed some day become internationally recognized as a sovereign entity”
    Words which have absolutely no basis in fact, and it is your burden to prove. Which you will be unable too.
    Just, to bring you up to speed. Neither your ignorance or mendacity excuses you from a duty of care. Many of us having no particular stake in the outcome have bothered to research both the history and the legal claims.
    Moving to the present with the legal sovereignty established absolutely in the UK’s favour.
    The legal governance is clearly laid out in the UNC, in which the UK has adhered to the letter. This is the only definitive binding international law.
    CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS
    7. Nothing contained in the present Charter shall authorise the United Nations to intervene in matters which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any state or shall require the Members to submit such matters to settlement under the present Charter…
    73. Members of the United Nations which have or assume responsibilities for ..peoples have not yet attained .. self-government recognize the principle ..b. to develop self-government, ...”
    103. In the event of a conflict between the obligations of the Members of the United Nations under the present Charter and their obligations under any other international agreement, their obligations under the present Charter shall prevail. ...

    Mar 07th, 2018 - 11:35 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Roger Lorton

    DT - Bermuda has also held at least one referendum, and opted to remain British.

    MoreCrap - we all need an interest lad. You should stick to Penguins.

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 12:04 am - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Marcos Alejandro

    Roger L orto n
    OK, if you insist..
    http://www.falklands.net/FalklandsCorruption.shtml

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 02:00 am - Link - Report abuse -2
  • Roger Lorton

    MoreCrap - You don't get any brighter, do you lad?

    IN THE FALKLAND ISLANDS SUPREME COURT Case No: SC/CIV/08/03
    IN THE MATTER OF AN APPLICATION FOR JUDICIAL REVIEW
    AND IN THE MATTER OF ORDER 53 OF THE RULES OF THE SUPREME COURT
    B E T W E E N THE QUEEN on the application of MICHAEL CHARLES BINGHAM Applicant
    And Her Majesty’s Attorney General for the Falkland Islands Respondent
    JUDGMENT

    https://falklandstimeline.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/michael-charles-bingham.pdf

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 02:08 am - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Marcos Alejandro

    Roger L orto

    The Editor of Penguin News, the Falkland Islands’ local newspaper, wrote an editorial which said “Chief Justice Woods found Executive Council’s decision ‘morally and constitutionally indefensible’. That’s a pretty strong sentiment. So will we see hands held up and an admission of ‘Sorry we made a mistake’? It doesn’t look like it. The statement issued by Executive Council this week in response to Chief Justice Wood’s judgement didn’t include the merest hint of an apology. The statement could have been the perfect opportunity to publicly take on board the Chief Justice’s words and apologise to Mr Bingham for this gross breach of his constitutional rights, and to the public as a whole for this error. After all the judgement has come from the Supreme Court - the most authoritative court in the land.” (Penguin News 28th November 2003)
    The following week the editorial read “The public’s angry response to the lack of apology from councillors following the Bingham judgement is clearly reflected in this week’s letter page and by the number of calls we’ve had to the office over the past few days.” (Penguin News 5th December 2003)

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 03:56 am - Link - Report abuse -3
  • Roger Lorton

    MoreCrap - you give me a news editorial, I give you the Supreme Court's judgment.

    No contest.

    It's also very old news, and of no consequence. Do try to keep up.

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 04:45 am - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Terence Hill

    What a remarkable exercise of ‘fair play’ that those that make ‘decisions’. Must even in the face of clear provocations, still have a duty to be fair. While Mike Bingham’s fraud was revealed, and he was correctly denied any benefit from it.

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 11:02 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @RL
    “Bermuda has also held at least one referendum, and opted to remain British.”

    So they did, in 1995, with 25.88% in favour of independence and 74.12% against. That's pretty decisive. I do wonder why the UK doesn't allow the other two options for decolonisation though. Many of the remaining OTs are tiny places that may not be viable as independent countries.

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 12:38 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Patrick Edgar

    @DemonTree, because in the most critical high stakes period our world has known when there are the most number of countries trying to get on the even plane of all the world's nations, Britain, for its size and population is one... if not the one country which is most abusing its power and influences in the world selfishly and inconsiderately of other country's destinies. As if it had not benefited enough already from the all the regions of the planet! It's disgusting! How many countries and nation's peoples must draw their course on this singular planet we all have to share? A little over two hundred? Look at what it's doing in the South Atlantic! Greedy beyond belief , dishonorably and shamefully USING Argentina to create a “sense of self” for the Falkland's just so that it can reach out at continue grabbing more of the world for itself ! South America must focus and concentrate on its own self generated path and growth, and that means working on its unity and homogeneity. Yet clearly Britain has always had something else in mind, more over since the war it has doubled it's meddlesome insolent rivalry instigating policies towards this family of nations. It has been doing this since colonial days. No respect for nations own affairs, no political morality what so ever, trying to pin brother countries against each other, panicking about it's future, yet it has no one to blame the situation it has gotten into but itself, frankly it's embarrassing. Do they have nothing else to talk about in that country other than meddlesome criticisms of other nations, and its constant nauseating recanting of its war history and intentions in the planets belligerence? Why don't they worry a little more about creating peace and ending conflicts instead of working so hard at keeping the planet at war?
    And@Terrence Hill. The ONLY “facts and educated knowledge” you have is that produced by yourselves in the English language, which when it comes to situations involving other people's....

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 04:28 pm - Link - Report abuse -1
  • Terence Hill

    Patrick Edgar
    “Look at what it's doing in the South Atlantic!” Maintaining It’s rightful claims under customary international law. Upholding, the UN Charter against those that attempt to circumvent it and bully their peaceful neighbours. In short, every quality that is commendable and desirable in a nation.
    It’s duly noted that you’re unable to refute the UN Charter articles that gives the UK the unfettered right. While showing that Argentine claims are based solely on delusion indoctrinating, that has absolutely no basis in fact.

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 05:04 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Patrick Edgar

    OH shut up ! Your country CREATED THE UN AND DESIGNED ITS LAWS ! Now your using it to manipulate the world ! International MEANS INTERNATIONAL, NOT “International for other countries to abide by” You are one of the most holier than thou self centered egotistically insolent brainwashed people on the planet ! According to the English language, every country in the world has some problem or other which poor patient saintly honest Britain has to put up with! GAW TAKE'AH WALK !

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 06:06 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @PE
    Britain having more power and influence for its size sounds like a good thing to me. Why would we want to give that up? Anyway, population and wealth are the important things when it comes to influence and Britain is 5th or 6th richest out of those ~200 countries.

    The way I see it all countries are more or less selfish. The less powerful ones are more inclined to cooperate for their own benefit, and the really powerful ones like the US and China don't need to. That's part of the reason for the EU, countries in Europe banding together to have more influence; isn't the Mercosur the same idea?

    And of course we have other things to talk about than criticisms of other nations: there's the weather, and royal weddings, and complaining that the trains are never on time. ;) What do people talk about in Italy? Or haven't you learned Italian yet?

    The UK isn't using Argentina to do anything. It's just a natural result of Argentina's choices. The Kirchner governments did all kinds of things against the Falklands, and what did Britain do during that time? Sent Prince William to do search and rescue and save people's lives, how terrible!

    “You are one of the most holier than thou self centered egotistically insolent brainwashed people on the planet !”

    You must be British then...

    PS. The UK helped create the UN exactly to encourage peace and end conflicts, but you're still complaining about it. Would you rather go back to the world without it?

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 06:42 pm - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Terence Hill

    Patrick Edgar
    So your unable to refute any thing I have presented. In fact all that you have revealed is that you are simply anglophobic and paranoid. At the end of the day you can’t even make a rational argument. In my neck of the woods the requirement in an such an instance as this is to put up or shut up.

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 07:40 pm - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Jo Bloggs

    Poor old Mike Bingham; he should have stuck to being a racing car driver. Oh hang on a minute, he was crap at that as well. What was the name of that university he got his 'degree' from again? Pistol Under the Bed? The only thing I am aware of that he was ever suited to was playing Otto Flick in an amateur production of Allo Allo in the town hall. He did a splendid job but then again he didn't need to act.

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 10:40 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Terence Hill

    Patrick Edgar
    So your unable to refute any thing I have presented. In fact all that you have revealed is that you are simply anglophobic and paranoid. At the end of the day you can’t even make a rational argument. In my neck of the woods the requirement in an such an instance as this is to put up or shut up.

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 10:56 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @Jo Bloggs
    Wow, this Mike Bingham certainly seems to have got on your bad side. Did you know him?

    Mar 08th, 2018 - 11:00 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Roger Lorton

    DT. The UK had a bad experience with a 'Association' arrangement which went bad leaving London with the responsibility but little power to do anything. Jamaica I think, but I'll have to look it up. There was another archipelago that gained independence only for part of it to object, leave the group and rejoin the UK as a BOT.

    I'm in a hurry at this moment so I can't look these up. I'll get back to you.

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 12:52 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jo Bloggs

    DT
    I knew him and he was a waste of space. A chip on his shoulder like you've never seen. He thought everyone was out to get him. He was a fraud. He was working here on the basis of a degree he bought on the internet Then he started dreaming up conspiracy theories and making up all sorts of garbage. The only trouble, as often happens, people used the wrong vehicle to try to get rid of him with and he won he case because it wasn't strong. But then at least he left. His employer should have taken action against him for working under falsified records but I guess they were too embarrassed when it came out. Often the case, and he'd already left them by now.

    I think Marcos knows him. I wonder what he thinks about him.

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 12:58 am - Link - Report abuse +2
  • Roger Lorton

    DT - my notes say - “On February 27, 1967 the British territory of Saint Christopher-Nevis- Anguilla had been granted a free association status with the UK as recognised by the United Nations in Resolution 1541 of 1960. In a move unforeseen by the United Nations, Anguilla voted to abandon free association and resume being a British dependency. Saint Kitts & Nevis went on to independence. Anguilla remains a British Overseas Territory. Since 1967, the UK has not offered a free association arrangement to any of the remaining territories.”

    This from Wiki - “In 1967, Britain granted Saint Kitts and Nevis full internal autonomy. Anguilla was also incorporated into the new unified dependency, named Saint Christopher-Nevis-Anguilla, against the wishes of many Anguillians. This led to two Anguillian Revolutions in 1967 and 1969 headed by Atlin Harrigan[20] and Ronald Webster. The island briefly operated as the independent ”Republic of Anguilla”. The goal of the revolution was not independence per se, but rather independence from Saint Kitts and Nevis and a return to being a British colony. British authority was fully restored in July 1971; in 1980, Anguilla was finally allowed to secede from Saint Kitts and Nevis and become a separate British Crown colony (now a British overseas territory).”

    Due to the nature of the free association arrangement, the UK was not able to get involved to sort out the 'revolutions'. It rather put the UK off the notion.

    The other alternative would be integration, which has been mooted on occasion, but the islanders don't seem very keen on the idea. A lot of practical difficulties too.

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 02:30 am - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Marcos Alejandro

    JB

    “The only trouble, as often happens, people used the wrong vehicle to try to get rid of him”


    Like Royal Marine Alan Addis?

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 05:10 am - Link - Report abuse -2
  • Roger Lorton

    I'm sure that the Royal Falkland Islands Police will welcome any new information that you have MoreCrap.

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 05:38 am - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Terence Hill

    Marcos Alejandro
    Number homicides in the Falklands 1 to 2,932, which is 0.03%
    Which indicates a much safer environment than that of her bellicose neighbour.
    Number homicides in Argentina. “In the year 2010 of this year- the latest year that statistics are available - Argentina had a murder rate of 5.5 per 100,000 population.”

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 12:34 pm - Link - Report abuse +1
  • DemonTree

    @Marcos Alejandro
    Do you know Mike Bingham then? Or just think he's useful to you?

    @Jo Bloggs
    Okay, that explains the dislike. Was there a problem with overfishing affecting the penguins? That seems to be what started the whole thing.

    @RL
    Yeah, I guess that didn't go so well. “In a move unforeseen by the United Nations, Anguilla voted to abandon free association and resume being a British dependency.” - because the UN is full of hypocrites who think being part of some other country (even a dictatorship!) is always better than being a colony with self-government, even though the latter is not ideal. And apparently Nevis later held a referendum on independence from St Kitts, but it didn't pass because they required a 2/3rds majority and only got 62% of votes. It seems very strange to me that the UN insists the borders of independent countries must follow the arbitrary decisions made by colonial powers, based on how they could most easily administer their territories, rather than what the people living in them want or identify as.

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 03:53 pm - Link - Report abuse +1
  • Marcos Alejandro

    Roger L orto
    You should ask that question to JB, seems like he is well informed about methods of forced disappearance around Stanley.

    DT
    Please refer your question to the English guru JB.

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 11:15 pm - Link - Report abuse -2
  • DemonTree

    @MA
    Why do foreigners always confuse English and British? But JB already answered, so I'm gonna assume you don't know him.

    PS. Denying someone citizenship != forced disappearance. I'd have thought you'd know the difference, living in Argentina.

    Mar 09th, 2018 - 11:37 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Terence Hill

    Marcos Alejandro
    “He is well informed about methods of forced disappearance” A policy inflicted on Argentinians by their own government, complete with flying nuns.
    There was only one alleged homicide some 38 years ago in all of their history. With the exception of some by residents of the River Plate. Whereas, if you compare it to Argentine homicides over the same period of time, which is substantially higher % rate per population.
    h ttps:en.wikipedia.orgwikiList_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate_by_decade
    “The value for Intentional homicides (per 100,000 people) in Argentina was 6.50 as of 2015. As the graph below shows, over the past 20 years this indicator reached a maximum value of 9.14 in 1997 and a minimum value of 6.50 in 2015.”
    h ttps://www.indexmundi.com/facts/argentina/homicide-rate
    But, even these stats cannot be trusted to wit:
    “How Argentina Makes Homicides Disappear
    The number of intentional homicides could be much higher. As reported by La Nacion, another 1,074 youth deaths were recorded as “deaths from outside aggression, of unknown intent,” but not as intentional homicides.
    http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2013/10/15/argentina_is_lowering_its_homicide_rate_by_calling_them_deaths_from_outside.html

    Mar 10th, 2018 - 12:09 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Roger Lorton

    MoreCrap- what question?

    Mar 10th, 2018 - 01:43 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Clem

    England will return the Malvinas within 25 years.

    Mar 10th, 2018 - 05:48 am - Link - Report abuse -2
  • darragh

    Hi Clem, how was school Friday?

    Have you finished your homework or are you going to leave it until Sunday.

    How's the weather in the West?

    Mar 10th, 2018 - 12:54 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • The Voice

    What a week!

    Mar 10th, 2018 - 09:35 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    Enjoying your badge of shame?

    Mar 10th, 2018 - 10:39 pm - Link - Report abuse -2
  • The Voice

    How did you get on at Crufts?

    Mar 11th, 2018 - 09:19 am - Link - Report abuse 0

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