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Charlie Hebdo plans to publish a million copies on next week's edition

Friday, January 9th 2015 - 06:59 UTC
Full article 78 comments
The irreverent weekly has a long history of amusing and provoking readers with mocking cartoons of politicians, religions leaders and celebrities The irreverent weekly has a long history of amusing and provoking readers with mocking cartoons of politicians, religions leaders and celebrities
Right wing leader Marine Le Pen, reiterated her plea to call for a referendum to reintroduce the death penalty in France if she is elected president in 2017. Right wing leader Marine Le Pen, reiterated her plea to call for a referendum to reintroduce the death penalty in France if she is elected president in 2017.

Charlie Hebdo, the controversial French magazine that was the target of a deadly attack on Wednesday will publish a million copies on next week's edition, compared to its usual print run of 60,000, its lawyer Richard Malka announced.

 The publication, however, will have only eight pages, half of the usual 16, and will be put together outside the magazine’s headquarters, which remain not accessible following the attack in which twelve people were killed.

The irreverent weekly, created in 1970, has a long history of amusing and provoking its readers with mocking cartoons taking at politicians, religions and celebrities as a means of chipping away at the authority of sometimes self-aggrandizing leaders and institutions.

In related news and following the terrorist attack against the headquarters of Charlie Hebdo magazine, the far-right National Front (FN) leader, Marine Le Pen, has reiterated her plea to call for a referendum to reintroduce the death penalty in France if she is elected president in 2017.

“I personally believe that the death penalty should exist in our legal arsenal,” Le pen said in a TV interview with channel France 2.

“I would offer French citizens the possibility to express themselves on the topic through a referendum,” she added.

Death penalty was officially abolished in France in 1981.

Categories: Politics, International.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • ElaineB

    Good news. They have the right to hold up all religions to scrutiny and criticism if we are to maintain the right to free speech in a democracy.

    There is no right to not be offended.

    Jan 09th, 2015 - 07:32 am 0
  • Heisenbergcontext

    As I'm sure many people have witnessed, the murders of Charlie Hebdo staff hasn't stopped cartoonists across both Europe and the rest of the world honouring the victims and mocking the terrorists. Terrorism didn't stop Londoners from returning to their city's streets after 7/7 and the Charlie Hebdo murders won't stop the worlds free press from satirising the absurdities of radical Islam and other extremist ideologies.

    Jan 09th, 2015 - 10:21 am 0
  • zathras

    Indeed, the right to criticize is fundamental.

    Religions do not get a “get out of jail free card”, making them exempt.

    If you don't like the hard fought freedoms we in the West enjoy, then you are free to move elsewhere.

    Jan 09th, 2015 - 10:23 am 0
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