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Montevideo, November 21st 2018 - 09:56 UTC

'A change in policy towards Malvinas', according to La Nacion

Saturday, February 20th 2016 - 07:01 UTC
Full article 89 comments
“Despite a deep difference, all issues of common interest, must be included in the bilateral agenda, so that there is nothing that can block the capacity of holding that dialogue” “Despite a deep difference, all issues of common interest, must be included in the bilateral agenda, so that there is nothing that can block the capacity of holding that dialogue”
In the seventies Argentina built Stanley's airport; patients travelled to the British Hospital in Buenos Aires and scholarships were offered to study in Argentina In the seventies Argentina built Stanley's airport; patients travelled to the British Hospital in Buenos Aires and scholarships were offered to study in Argentina
This change of attitude was clear when the recent meeting in Davos of Macri with PM David Cameron, but “we are talking of form and not of substance”. This change of attitude was clear when the recent meeting in Davos of Macri with PM David Cameron, but “we are talking of form and not of substance”.

Buenos Aires daily La Nacion dedicated its main Friday editorial to the Falklands/Malvinas dispute, (A change in the policy towards Malvinas), underlining the new Argentine government's position promoting bilateral relations on all issues with the UK, but never forgetting the 'deep difference' over the Islands.

 The editorial begins stating that the government of President Mauricio Macri believes in a viable new bilateral relation with the UK, despite the unrenounceable sovereignty claim over the Falklands and South Atlantic Islands. This change of attitude was clear when the recent meeting in Davos of Macri with PM David Cameron, but “we are talking of form and not of substance”.

In effect from now onwards Argentina and the UK will have a normal bilateral agenda with all issues of interest for both countries, including the South Atlantic Islands and their projection on Antarctica, for which Argentina has created a special Under Secretariat for the South Atlantic.

The editorial adds that diplomacy will have another chance, on the half century of the UN General Assembly Resolution 2065 which acknowledged the existence of a conflict and invited both sides to overcome it through discussions.

Since then, the British particularly between 1966 and 1982 examined different solution alternatives such as the 1974 condominium, or the sovereignty lease-back which was to be implemented gradually beginning in the eighties.

The idea was to 'serenely' build with time a true cooperation spirit between the all sides involved as effectively happened in the seventies when Argentina built Stanley's airport; patients travelled to the British Hospital in Buenos Aires for medical care; scholarships were offered to study in Argentina, plus a special document which exempted the Islanders from transit controls when travelling to or leaving Argentina. “In just three years some 1.600 people took advantage of these facilities and the bilateral relation, step by step started to melt the ice of distance”.

After that period came war in 1982, followed by an arrogant Argentine national policy, together with a very harsh and inflexible relation with clashes of all kinds which revolved on to a single issue, the Islands. With no chance of persuasion, which unfortunately came across a similar attitude from the other side systematically denying to consider Argentina's 'legitimate' rights, and the repeated calls for negotiations from the international community, the situation put at stake the good faith that must always prevail in relations among nations.

The collapse of international oil prices has postponed the extreme dreams of those who believed that the South Atlantic subsoil could become a new Saudi Arabia, which presumably will push all sides to the necessary realism that should lead to normalizing relations. It should also help with a new chapter in which, without arrogance, two nations that have many issues in common can begin to address them jointly in a serene framework to the benefit of all, including the UN Decolonization Committee.

Thus statements from foreign minister Susana Malcorra, during an interview with La Nacion, give an idea of the depth of the turn that relations between Argentina and the UK could reach, despite the sovereignty conflict over the Islands. The minister said at the time that besides the fact “there is an issue in which we have a deep difference”, all issues of common interest, must be included in the bilateral agenda, “so that there is nothing that can block the capacity of holding that dialogue”.

Finally, the proposition is evidence that without losing sight of Argentina's objectives, you can take advantage of the enormous potential that can exist in relations with all countries, including Great Britain.

Top Comments

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  • Islander1

    Who on earth wrote all this total tripe!!
    1.The Permanent airport pictured was built with BRITISH Aid. Arg built previously a small temporary metal plate strip nearby. It eventually blew to bits.

    2 Arg and UK appear (good idea) to have agreed to try and normalise relations with the FI question put aside as a separate issue. Thus the recent visit to FI of Minister Faloon is actually 100% IRELEVANT to UK-Arg relations.

    3 Collapse of Oil prices have NOT ended hydrocarbons development off the Islands. likely to slow it down a few years obviously - that is all. Why are Premier/RKH still spending £100,000s a year on the planning and contract projections for SeaLion etc!
    Why are they and Noble merely planning to negotiate a deferral time with FIG over exploration phase on current licences.NOT cancelling them!

    4 NOTHING outstanding at the UN at all - other than Argentina,s record of REFUSAL to comply with an INTERNATIONAL LEGAL BINDING Security Council Resolution -502- in April 1092!

    5 Transit Controls pre 1982 DID exist - we had to apply for and carry with us aspecial stupid little piece of paper called a “White Card” - we could NOT transit Argentina normally like anyone else!

    Neither LeaseBack nor Condominium were ever agreed let alone started to be implemented pre 1982 - both were rejected!

    Cannot Arg ever get its head around the simple fact - it DESTROYED for ever its COLONIAL aims and ambitions by its military invasion of a small peacefull community in 1982. Just try and get over your Imperial Colonial Ambitions Argentina.


    Guess this article is just a classis example of the warped Fantasy World so many still live in in Argentina?

    Feb 20th, 2016 - 09:39 am 0
  • CapiTrollism_is_back!!

    When the UK gets over it's colonial ambitions the UK can have morality on this issue. Well actually, it will never have morality on the issue of colonialism. It would be like Germany have ever again moral grounds on anti-semitism.

    Some things just can't be shaken off no matter how long it's been or how different the behavior is now. Which the UK has not even changed their behavior, they still want to colonize Antarctica.

    And since the UK and Brits love to claim Antarctica is theirs, then they are fully responsible for the genocide of 150 thousand penguins. They had 6 years to do something about it, in their “territory”, and did nothing. The UK should be held accountable for their latest crime against other creatures of nature, the latest in a very very long list of crimes in the last 300 years.

    Feb 20th, 2016 - 09:55 am 0
  • HansNiesund

    @2

    Still haven't figured out that Argentina is a colonial settler state that exterminated the vast majority of its original inhabitants?

    Did you see the reports of all those Brit colonizers down there in Antarctica taking selfies with dead penguins they'd killed for the purpose?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-35606354

    Feb 20th, 2016 - 10:15 am 0
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