Health & Science

Health & Science
Friday, October 30th 2015 - 08:03 UTC

WHO clarification: moderate consumption of meat, particularly preserved meat

Latest IARC review does not ask people to stop eating processed meats but indicates that reducing consumption can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

The World Health Organization, WHO, has received a number of queries, expressions of concern and requests for clarification following the publication of a report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) relating to processed meat and colorectal cancer.

Thursday, October 29th 2015 - 14:50 UTC

Tuberculosis mortality nearly halved since 1990

“The report shows that TB control has had a tremendous impact in terms of lives saved and patients cured,” said WHO Director-General Margaret Chan.

The fight against tuberculosis is paying off, with this year’s death rate nearly half of what it was in 1990. Nevertheless, 1.5 million people died from TB in 2014. Most of these deaths could have been prevented, according to the World Health Organization’s Global Tuberculosis Report 2015, which was released on Wednesday in Washington, DC.

Tuesday, October 27th 2015 - 09:39 UTC

Processed meats can cause colorectal cancer in humans, says WHO

Each 50-gram (1.8-ounce) portion of processed meat eaten daily increases the risk of colorectal cancer by 18%, the agency estimated.

Eating processed meats like hot dogs, sausages and bacon can cause colorectal cancer in humans, and red meat is also a likely cause of the disease, World Health Organization (WHO) experts said.

Monday, October 19th 2015 - 21:46 UTC

Polar operators keen on conducting citizen science projects

Kim Crosbie, Executive Director, IAATO, highlighted that after a period of downturn, tourism to Antarctica is recovering and diversifying

Field staff from the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operations (IAATO) and the Association of Arctic Expedition Cruise Operators (AECO) got together in Toronto last month in the first Polar field staff conference ever held. Seventy-five people attended over the three days representing 24 IAATO/AECO members, three governments, three universities and the World Wildlife Fund.

Wednesday, October 14th 2015 - 21:08 UTC

Billions of juvenile polar cod under the Arctic ice, confirmed by German marine biologists

The study recently published in Polar Biology, shows that only juvenile fish are found under the ice, a habitat that could disappear as a result of climate change.

Using a new net, marine biologists from Germany's Alfred Wegener Institute have, for the first time, been able to catch polar cod directly beneath the Arctic sea ice with a trawl, allowing them to determine their large-scale distribution and origin. This information is of fundamental importance, as polar cod are a major source of food for seals, whales and seabirds in the Arctic.

Friday, October 9th 2015 - 08:04 UTC

Scientists flock to Falklands for vital South Georgia future research strategy

Scientists and South Georgia representatives at Falklands' Government House on Tuesday evening

Fifteen scientists from institutes around the world gathered in the Falkland Islands this week to assess future scientific requirements for South Georgia. Project manager Dr Vicky Peck from the British Antarctic Survey based in Cambridge explained that the South Georgia Future Science project wanted to identify what the scientific needs of the island were and how they could best be facilitated.

Wednesday, October 7th 2015 - 14:27 UTC

Neutrinos oscillation discovery gives a Japanese and a Canadian the Physics Nobel prize

Takaaki Kajita and Arthur McDonald's breakthrough was the discovery of a phenomenon called neutrino oscillation that has upended scientific thinking

A Japanese and a Canadian scientist won the 2015 Nobel Prize for Physics on Tuesday for discovering that elusive subatomic particles called neutrinos have mass, opening a new window onto the fundamental nature of the universe.

Tuesday, October 6th 2015 - 09:04 UTC

Nobel in medicine for creating natural drugs to combat parasites; China's first prize

Inspired by traditional Chinese medicine, Tu discovered that a compound from the wormwood plant was highly effective against the malaria parasite

Nobel prize in medicine went Monday to three scientists hailed as “heroes in the truest sense of the word” for saving millions of lives with the creation of the world's leading malaria-fighting drug and another that has nearly wiped out two devastating tropical diseases.

Thursday, October 1st 2015 - 08:19 UTC

Argentina launches the three-ton ARSAT-2 telecommunications satellite

The satellite is the second in ARSAT project’s repertoire, following the launch of ARSAT-1 in October last year

Argentina on Wednesday launched the ARSAT-2 spacecraft from a site in French Guyana, with the goal of providing telecommunication services across much of the Western hemisphere. ARSAT (Argentine Satellite Solutions), a state-owned company created in 2006, monitored the launch and operation of ARSAT-2 from the Benavídez Ground Station in northern Buenos Aires province.

Thursday, September 24th 2015 - 07:41 UTC

Brazil and UK joint research of critical elements in the deep northeast Atlantic

“A research expedition is planned for next year to the northeast Atlantic to discover what controls the richness of these deep-sea deposits,” Dr. Murton said.

Scientists from the U.K. and Brazil will work together to study the formation of ocean minerals essential for new technology, particularly environmental technology such as photovoltaic cells.

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