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Montevideo, June 20th 2024 - 05:24 UTC

 

 

Mujica ungagged: Nestor Kirchner a ‘difficult and slimy’ guy, but also had his positive side

Monday, April 8th 2013 - 05:00 UTC
Full article 98 comments

President Jose Mujica acid comments on Argentina’s presidential couple Cristina Fernandez-Nestor Kirchner were further developed in a monthly magazine which on Saturday published a long article with the Uruguayan leader, although it must be pointed out that the interview was dated March 18th. Read full article

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  • mastershakejb

    lol, chew on that, slimey fascist Argentines

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 05:27 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    Baboso means arrogant, not slimy. These proud monolinguals will never successfully translate anything Mujica says...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 09:01 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Britworker

    Well the truth is coming out isn't it. Not quite the pantomime we have all been used to seeing and hearing. Clearly Mr Mujica and I suspect many Uruguayans are less than keen on their bellicose, slimy, cross-eyed old hag neighbours :-)

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 09:05 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • trenchtoast

    whatever it means its not a complement, I like this one from the urban dictionary ;

    1. A dumb person or an idiot; 2. A person who stares too much.

    Root of the word: The word “baboso” is a Spanish word that when literally translated is used to identify a person that slobbers too much. Because slobbering is usually the result of ones mouth hanging open for a prolonged period of time, the person is identified as an idiot, or someone who stares too much.
    Noun:
    Que me ves pinche baboso?
    What are you looking at fucking baboso?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 09:48 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • GeoffWard2

    On the larger question, why now?
    Mujica has created 'distance' from Argentina in the same week as the announcement of the restart of negotiations with the EU.
    This can be read as the voting with Brasil and against Argentina.
    Perhaps CFK would have been wiser to have made happen the dredging of the port entrances to Uruguay, because it strikes me that BR/UR/PA outvotes AR/VE.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 10:14 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • mastershakejb

    lol, this idiot Stevie was also trying to convince us the other day that Mujica's “vieja” terminology was a kind, loving reference to Cristina....but finally later admitted it was “old hag” after all the news sources stated it to be the case and Argentina announced that it was officially butthurt over the comment

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 10:19 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    My bet is this is all leading up to Uruguay and Brazil pulling out of MercoSur shortly.

    How many months have I been saying this fake SA solidarity nonsense CFK and minions keep talking about is just a farce.

    Everything is unravelling in Arg
    Everything
    and I can't wait for the winter

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 10:54 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Optimus_Princeps

    Everyone at work was laughing at Mujica's comments, while laughing at pictures of which compared Nestor's similarity to Igor from the movie “Young Frankenstein”.

    You'll never find an educated person that supports the K's. Their arrogance makes their idiocy more shameful.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:03 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • hipolyte

    Comment removed by the editor.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:08 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    4
    The day you hear an Uruguayan say “pinche baboso”, you'll now you got the wrong airplane.

    6
    No one ever admitted anything of the sort, you are the only one saying vieja means “old hag”. Vieja means old [female].
    Show me a post where I have “admitted” what you say. Or just stop lying.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:22 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    10. So you are saying every newspaper around the world got the translation wrong?
    And the Rgs protested over nothing?

    yeah that sounds about right
    hahaha

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:24 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Leiard

    @9 hipolyte

    Argentina was responsible for all the lives lost in 1982 !

    Margaret Thatcher was a far greater person and leader than CFK

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:26 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Redrow

    @9

    Margaret Thatcher (RIP) saved your country from the Junta. Perhaps you can at least give her that.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:27 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    11
    Nobody is saying that vieja, tuerco and baboso are flattering words.
    But they still don't mean what you lot are trying to reanslate them into.
    Vieja means old femala, not old hag, tuerco means cross (one)-eyed and baboso means arrogant, not slimy.
    I'm just helping you out here in your monolingualism, no need to get upset about it.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:29 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    14. Stevie, I think the world's newspapers are probably a little better reference to use than you.

    It is much better to have a good knowledge of 1 language than a failure in many.

    I am twisting myself laughing

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:32 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Anbar

    @9

    she was 87, cant really see what “divine justice” has to do with it whatsoever....

    unless you mean she lived a long, happy and fruitful life, which she did.

    And without her Argentina would still be throwing people out of aeroplanes for a bit of fun.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:35 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    15
    I think any Uruguayan knows his language better than the world newspapers following the same agenda.
    Say what you wish yanqui, that will most certainly not change our language.

    Your face can twist in laughter, so can your body, or you if you wish. But I'm not sure if you can twist yourself laughing...

    Why don't you try to get a grip on your own language before trying to translate others?

    ...

    Thatcher is gone, the world is a better place.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:38 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Anbar

    “”Thatcher is gone, the world is a better place.“””

    I rather suspect that we will be seeing the best of Argentina in the next few hours & days.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:40 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Elena

    I enjoyed the touch of human reality this gave them XD, is probably best he doesn´t apologize this time, it would only look utterly false and even some Argentine ppl agreed with him. I also loved to hear from an Uruguayan “at last our president say something not controversial” :-)
    This article could be very right in assuming this could help both of them in their popularity.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:40 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    You're the one that said you were twisting yourself laughing over the weekend.
    I am just pointing out and mocking your ignorance

    Plus I think it is kind of hilarious
    It shows how with 1 statement you can blow all credibility.

    I am pretty sure someone that grew up in europe isn't an expert on Uruguayan slang or anything else in the SA.
    I bet I lived there longer than you have

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:44 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    18
    You mean like we saw with the Brits and Chavez? I wouldn't think so, she wasn't half that important. The world is a better place and that's it.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:45 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    Margaret Thatcher - Capitalism and a Free Society

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=yoIZdEBf9Wk

    Godspeed to a great lady! RIP.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:46 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    20
    No, that's just another product of your imagination. I said I was “twisting in laughter”, not twisting myself laughing.
    But hey, ty repeating your lie until the point you believe it yourself, like you do with everything else.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:49 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    twisting in laughter

    Oh yeah that is even stupider
    Love it!
    Where did you learn English?
    Maybe you should stick to Spanish or Danish and stop embarrassing yourself.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:52 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Leiard

    @18 stevi

    How does her death do anything to change the world ?

    She did that very well when she was alive.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:52 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    a twist means, amongst other things, a contortion of the body or the face.

    Where di you learn English?
    Stick to... not speaking at all and stop embarrassing yourself.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:54 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    I learned English growing up obviously you didn't.

    Give up you had a bad teacher
    take the lesson and move on

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:56 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Anbar

    “18
    You mean like we saw with the Brits and Chavez?”

    eh?... Chavez who?...????

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:56 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    28
    See? Now add the fact that Thatcher was even less important...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 12:58 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • trenchtoast

    Whats Thatcher got to do with Mujica calling Kirchner a cross-eyed slobbering idiot..? Or whatever it was he really said.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:00 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    30
    Apart of the slobbering, nothing.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:02 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • trenchtoast

    Touché

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:04 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    For yanqui's sake, it should be “Apart from”, not “apart of”. Not that it will help his understanding, but at least he wont short-circuit...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:07 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    Well we could talk about the 100os of people in BA that is still w/o power going on 6 days now.
    I seem to remember saying one of the reasons I moved back to the USA was because the electricity in my house in BA kept going out whenever it rained, was a little windy, the moon was out...good gracious just about anything put me in the dark.
    I think it was Guzz that said I was lying
    Although I don't think he has ever been to SA

    How the heck many retournados living in Scandinavia with a hatred for USA and UK do we have on this board anyway?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:11 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    34
    Lets talk about school shootouts in USA instead, as I believe the lives of children is a bit more important than having electricity.
    First things first, you know.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:15 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Condorito

    “baboso” as a noun means “slug”
    when used as an adjective, i.e “tuerto baboso” it could mean:

    “cross eyed slug”
    “cross eyed fool”
    “the slimy cross eyed one”
    “the drooling cross eyed one”

    There are a few more definitions one could add, none of which are complementary.

    Given what Pepe has to put up with, I think it is very polite of him to use such relatively mild terms. “the cross eyed slug” is quite endearing and generous.

    The cross eyed slug...has Pepe been reading Conqueror's posts!
    ...
    RIP Lady Thatcher: a great lady who will be remembered fondly in Chile.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:38 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    36
    Tomar el once in Uruguay means “drink the 11”. I'm sure it means something else in Chile, wouldn't you agree?
    Baboso means arrogant in Uruguay, regardless of what it means in Chile.

    If you are talking about a babosa, then it is indeed slimy or slug.
    But baboso is male and slug in Spanish isn't.

    If you are talking about a baby, then it could easily mean drooling, but you would never refer to a baby as a “baboso”, more like “se babea”.

    If a man in Uruguay calls another man “baboso”, it doesn't mean the other guy is drooling, nor is he calling him a slug or slimy. He's telling him he's arrogant.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:46 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Anbar

    “”28
    See? Now add the fact that Thatcher was even less important...“””

    If you say it often enough do you think it will be true?

    ---

    I'm not sure why you keep arguing with native english-speakers as to what something means or how it is used in common usage... every time you have you have completely missed the point.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:52 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Faulconbridge

    “it must be pointed out that the interview was dated March 18th.”

    Sure it wasn't April 1st?
    Politicians don't say things like that in public, no matter if they think them, for obvious reasons.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:54 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    38. Shh he thinks he knows English better than we do. It makes him look so smart don't you think?
    I am twisting in laughter

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:55 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    38
    “Common usage” is not grammatics in any language, as little as green is restricted to lawn. Learn your language.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:55 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    as little as green is restricted to lawn

    WTF?
    It is getting worse and worse
    maybe try google translate

    hahaha

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 01:58 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Troy Tempest

    @14stevie
    ”11
    Nobody is saying that vieja, tuerco and baboso are flattering words.
    But they still don't mean what you lot are trying to reanslate them into.
    Vieja means old femala, not old hag, tuerco means cross (one)-eyed and baboso means arrogant, not slimy.“

    Stevie
    Whatever you argue the 'exact' 'correct' translation of each word is, as a statement about Nestor and The Sea Hag, the meaning is obviously very insulting and was meant that way.

    - Mujica did not even defend himself - it would have caused even more laughter if he came out and said, ” I meant it in a familiar, brotherly, and nice way”
    - the Argentine press took it as greatly derogatory
    - the Argentine people seem to feel it was outrageous
    - CFK was offended
    - the Argentine government found it offensive and issued a public letter condemning it and censuring Uruguay
    - the Uruguay Ambassador was ordered to report to the Argentine government, to have his feet roasted over the fire.
    - Mujica felt compelled to reassure the people's were still brothers, if not the characters in office.

    Pretty clear that it was greatly offensive in nature.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:00 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    “Common usage”
    “Everybody knows”
    “In 2056”
    “I have a friend who says”
    “You are a moron”
    “You can't spell”

    There you have it, a complete list of your strongest arguments.
    Not even google translate could help you with that one, yanqui.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:02 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Condorito

    JAJA en Uruguay: TUERTO quiere decir inteligente. VIEJA quiere decir bella. ANDAAAA MUJICA !!!

    Stevie, if he had wanted to say “arrogant” he could have said “soberbio”. “Baboso” has a derogatory tone in this context, especially when used in the same breath as “el tuerto”.

    You are hopelessly trying to maintain that Mujica's words don't portray a dislike of the Ks. He dislikes them, he has said as much, hence all the angst in the Argie press over the last couple of days.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:03 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ynsere

    Condorito @ 36
    Baboso can have many meanings in Uruguay, as you say. Another two are:
    1. A dirty old man slavering over young girls
    2. A bully.
    Perhaps our president meant the latter. Fits the bill, doesn't it?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:04 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    Troy
    And because of all those things you mention, words just magically change meaning? I dont see your point.

    Condorito
    Baboso is derogatory indeed, means arrogant in Uruguay.

    Tuerto isn't something derogatory, it's just a fact.
    There are good tuertos, and bad tuertos. In between there are many kinds of tuertos.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:08 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Anbar

    “”“38
    “Common usage” is not grammatics in any language, as little as green is restricted to lawn. Learn your language.”!“”

    You keep saying that, but then you have a go at everybody else for not listening to you when you expose, at length, on what words mean in your country... in common usage.

    Its pretty bizarre to say the least... i mean you directly contradict your own actions and slag people off for doing exactly what you then do.

    eejit

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:11 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    My guess is he has never been to Uruguay since his family fled in the 70s.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:13 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Gauchito Gil

    Sorry my English:

    Well done Mujica!! Look at the revolution you have caused in our FILTHY ARGENTINE government with just a few words!! You are great because here we like to sit behind a monitor and keyboard to complain and insult what we like because no one has the balls to say to the face like you did!! Here no one is offended in truth.... They just hurt someone to tell them the pure truth!!! And surely now many pro-K will jump up and shout about the beautiful and successful model of government (according to them!).

    QUE GRANDE QUE SOS MUJICA!!!!! MIRA LA REVOLUCIÓN QUE CAUSASTE EN EL ASQUEROSO GOBIERNO QUE TENEMOS CON TUS SIMPLES PALABRAS!!!! Y SOS GRANDE XQ ACÁ LOS ARGENTINOS NOS GUSTA SENTARNOS DETRAS DE UN MONITOR Y UN TECLADO PARA QUEJARNOS E INSULTAR LO QUE NO NOS GUSTA XQ NO NOS DA LA CARA PARA DECIRLO PÚBLICAMENTE COMO LO HICISTE VOS!!!! SIMPLEMENTE X ESO... SOS UN GRANDE!!!! APARTE LA VERDAD NO OFENDE A NADIE.... ACA EN EL GOBIERNO NADIE SE OFENDIÓ.... SIMPLEMENTE LES DOLIÓ QUE ALGUIEN LES DIGA LA PURA VERDAD!!!!! Y SEGURAMENTE ACA AHORA VAN A SALTAR MUCHOS K DEFENDIENDO HERMOSO Y EXITOSO MODELO DE GOBIERNO ( segun ellos!!!)

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:16 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Troy Tempest

    @47stevie

    “And because of all those things you mention, words just magically change meaning? I dont see your point.”

    To make it very clear for you:

    I am saying that despite your interpretation to us of the words and remarks, the Uruguayan and Argentine Spanish speaking people took the remarks to be highly offensive and insulting, as reported in their own Argentine and Uruguayan press, and by Argentina's government. The Government released an official open letter stating just that.

    Sorry, perhaps you missed some of the subtle nuances of the language. Perhaps you have forgotten.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:22 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Condorito

    @46ynsere
    So you mean “baboso” has several meanings in Uruguay too!! I expected it did. Why is Stevie insisting that it means “arrogant”? That is slightly baboso of him.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:24 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    Anbar
    There is a slight difference in taking a word in (Uruguayan) Spanish and translating by will, changing the meaning entirely (from arrogant to slobbering), and taking a word in English and using it for what it means (to twist, a contortion of the body or face). Maybe the preposition is incorrect, but I'm not altering the meaning of the word.

    Baboso in Spanish is slang, twist in English isn't

    And if you can twist with pain, you can surely twist with laughter...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:30 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    twist with pain

    Has anyone ever heard this phrase from a native English Speaker?
    Ever? Any where?

    I haven't

    but I am twisting with laughter

    Gads Stevie have lunch I think your blood sugar is low

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:33 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    yanqui
    Lots of things you haven't heard, that is the main source of your profecies...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:43 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    profecies

    hmm wonder what you were trying for...

    I was thinking back when you were Guzz, wasn't there another word you used that was so uncommon it sounded ridiculous?

    And when it was pointed out you got all offended and said we don't know our own language.

    Have you not learned anything during your sabbatical?
    What was that word?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:52 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    56
    Ask your crystal ball, I have no clue.

    I could guess though.
    A word that you find ridiculous, hmmmm..... Could it be “Truth”? “Honour” maybe? How about “Decency”?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:55 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • darragh

    I always twist when I'm playing pontoon and it's very painful when I get more than 21.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 02:58 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    Ugh, I can't remember I 'll have to ask one of my friends about it when I see him next. We laughed and laughed though.

    Anyone else remember?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 03:00 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ynsere

    Guzz ... er ... Stevie's fibbing again. The dictionary of the Real Academia Española lists 10 meanings of “baboso”. And the RAE is about as “official” as you can get in the Spanish language.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 05:05 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    ynsere
    That is Castellano, the original language we all share.
    Are you implying whole of South America speaks Spanish based on the RAE?

    Sos un chanta y te tengo junado :)

    Try RAE on that one :)

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 05:17 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ynsere

    Guzz ... er ... Stevie's trying to mislead us. He said “baboso” is slang (see Post 53). It isn't slang, it's in the RAE.
    See how he “twists” the truth?
    Now he's used an expression not used in Uruguay “te tengo junado”. I wonder what it means? Perhaps something like “te tengo calado”, a Uruguayan expression that means “I've seen through you”? But the poor man (?) has obviously never heard it.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 05:33 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    ynsere
    Baboso is slang in Uruguay, if not, you tell me what it means.
    I'm most certain you've heard the expression in numerous occasions and I'm also sure that in none of them it meant you where slobbering :)
    There is also a risk a female calls you baboso. In that case, all you have to do is to get of her back and leave her alone :)

    Junado and calado has roughly the same meaning, and both comes from Argentina. So, either we are both from Argentina, or you just don't know your slang...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 05:47 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    Ynsere, Stevie/Guzz is probably using the same “slang” translation site as he is for his English.
    Twisting is not a descriptor for either pain or laughing so it is probably just as far off for spanish.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 05:55 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    yanqui
    You can twist in agony.
    You can twist in pain.
    You can twist in laughter.

    In all cases it means a contortion of the face or the body, as a result of the chosen substantive.

    If not, you tell me how the word is used, with that very same meaning.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:06 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    I keep telling you that is not how that word is used and you keep denying it.

    You sir are a retard.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:25 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    yanqui
    “If not, you tell me how the word is used, with that very same meaning.”

    Read that last sentence? Come on yanqui, show us your language skills. I'm not asking for much, it's your native tongue, after all...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:28 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ynsere

    Everyone:
    Guzz ... er ... Stevie's mixing the issues on purpose. It's his (?) way of not accepting the real world. He's (?) best ignored.
    Would somebody please tell the little sod that calling a Uruguayan Argentine is the worst insult going. Ask him to try to be nice. And not fib.

    Yankeeboy:
    The word reminds me of Chubby Checker. More about wagging one's arse than contortions.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:30 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    The word I think you are grasping for is writhe...

    Clearly you had a very bad English teacher.

    Twisting in laughter.

    retard

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:33 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    No yanqui
    I'm referring to the word “twist”.
    Meaning “A contortion or distortion of the body, especially the face.”

    How is that word used, you say?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:37 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    twist (twst)
    v. twist·ed, twist·ing, twists
    v.tr.
    1.
    a. To wind together (two or more threads, for example) so as to produce a single strand.
    b. To form in this manner: twist a length of rope from strands of hemp.
    2. To wind or coil (vines or rope, for example) about something.
    3. To interlock or interlace: twist flowers in one's hair.
    4. To make (one's way) in a tortuous manner: twisted my way through the briar patch.
    5. To turn so as to face another direction: twisted their heads around at the sound of the doorbell.
    6. To impart a spiral or coiling shape to, as by turning the ends in opposite directions: twisting wire into a loop.
    7.
    a. To turn or open by turning: twisted off the bottle cap.
    b. To pull, break, or snap by turning: twist off a dead branch.
    8. To wrench or sprain: twist one's wrist.
    9. To alter the normal aspect of; contort: twist one's mouth into a wry smile.
    10. To alter or distort the intended meaning of: The cross-examiner twisted the words of the witness. See Synonyms at distort.
    11. To alter or distort the mental, moral, or emotional character of: The trauma twisted the child's outlook.
    v.intr.
    1. To be or become twisted.
    2. To move or progress in a winding course; meander: The river twisted toward the sea.
    3. To squirm; writhe: twist with pain.
    4. To rotate or revolve.
    5. To dance the twist.
    6. To move so as to face in another direction

    Where is twist with laughter? Hmm not there? How odd.

    I am thinking it wasn't the teacher that was bad but the student was retarded.

    As I said many posts ago take the lesson and move on
    You're not going to win this one you clearly aren't understanding you are wrong.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:48 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    yanqui
    You little deciever you :)
    Vontinue, it doesn't stop there, and you know it :)

    Let me help you out with the rest.

    n.
    1. Something twisted or formed by twisting, especially:
    a. A length of yarn, cord, or thread, especially a strong silk thread used mainly to bind the edges of buttonholes.
    b. Tobacco leaves processed into the form of a rope or roll.
    c. A loaf of bread or other bakery product made from pieces of dough twisted together.
    d. A sliver of citrus peel twisted over or dropped into a beverage for flavoring.
    2. The act of twisting or the condition of being twisted; a spin, twirl, or rotation.
    3. Sports
    a. A complete rotation of the body around its vertical axis, as in diving and gymnastics.
    b. A spinning motion given to a ball when thrown or struck in a specific way.
    4.
    a. The state of being twisted into a spiral; torsional stress or strain.
    b. The degree or angle of torsional stress.
    5.
    a. A contortion or distortion of the body, especially the face.
    b. A distortion of meaning: gave my words a misleading twist.
    6. A sprain or wrench, as of an ankle.
    7. A change in direction; a turn: a sharp twist in the path.
    8. An unexpected change in a process or a departure from a pattern, often producing a distortion or perversion: a twist of fate; a story with a quirky twist.
    9. A personal inclination or eccentricity; a penchant or flaw: an odd twist to his character.
    10. A dance characterized by vigorous gyrations of the hips and arms.

    Now have a glance at 5a and please answer my question. I'm starting to think you can't...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:57 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    It is still not used like you are trying to use it.
    Please take the lesson and move on

    retard

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 06:59 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • mastershakejb

    lol, Stevie's STILL trying to convince everyone that Mujica didn't mean “old hag” and “slimy”, hilarious! I wonder how long he can keep embarrassing himself

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:01 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ItalianfromEurope

    As someone who speaks the Queen's Englishi .... the use of “twist” in this context is very unusual and would certainly raise eyebrows.

    The correct word that should be used is “writhe”.... so you would be “writhing in laughter” ...

    Please use “writhe” in future.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:02 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    75. I pointed that out and apparently as someone who grew up speaking English that isn't good enough.
    He is apparently fine sounding like a goofball.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:04 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Brit Bob

    and a 'Slimy guy'. Says a lot.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:04 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    73
    Then SHOW ME how it's used or just say “I don't know” and move on :)

    74
    I don't have to convince you of anything as I don't really care if you spend your life thinking it means this or that. Just look at yanqui, he even has issues with his own language.
    But it's quite amusing. Quite amusing indeed :)

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:05 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    I am quite secure in the knowledge that I am correct.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:07 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • mastershakejb

    lol, everyone on here pointing and laughing at stevie, while he tries to pretend he's somehow winning this argument.
    typical argie behavior, deny, deny, deny reality til you default/lose war, then start same process over again

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:07 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • trenchtoast

    Stevie, you can twist your ankle or more preferably, your neck. Its hard to think of another part of the body you would use twist with over another word.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:09 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Conqueror

    @14 It seems that baboso means variously: drooling, slobbering; dribbling; slobbering; slimy; slushy; mushy, foolishly sentimental; fawning, snivelling; dirty; silly; rotten, caddish; fool, idiot or drip. No sign of “arrogant”.
    @16 I tend to agree. It was clearly “divine justice” that she was in a position and had the guts to defeat the devil's spawn. It's only unfortunate that she had the female attribute of mercy. Had HMS Conqueror continued and sunk the Belgrano's two escorts and then gone back and machine-gunned all the “temporary” survivors, the argies might have surrendered much earlier. Equally, had we “reduced” the number of POWs by 50%, as argieland didn't want them, they might not now be so keen on whingeing. Never mind. Next time!
    @21 What a pity she was so merciful. Should have nuked argieland at the time. And any other latam enemy.
    @29 Inadequate, gutless cowards always like to denigrate the deceased. Especially deceased who made a real difference. But if there was one recent death that really made the world a better place, it was Chavez. Why doesn't someone in Venezuela have the bottle to put a bullet through Maduro's head? And his little canary. Same goes for Correo, Morales and CFK. Mujica can pop off in his own time. As long it's the next 6 months.
    @44 Here's a strong argument. You're a juvenile prat.
    @47 Really? It seems tuerto means twisted, bent crooked. Seems to describe Nessie.
    @53 We can certainly “twist” your neck!
    @57 What would a “latino” know about truth, honour or decency? I suppose there are some. But not you. Just a weasel.
    @72 Aaah, the “proof”!
    @81 Where do we think “twisting his balls until they rip off” comes in his list?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:22 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • trenchtoast

    Yes, that makes sense. You can also twist a scrotal sack.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:26 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ItalianfromEurope

    @ Stevie

    At the end of the day “you are round the twist”!!

    British slang probably spoken by the Queen of England
    15 round the twist (Brit. slang) barmy (slang) batty (slang) bonkers (slang, chiefly Brit.) crazy, cuckoo (informal) daft (informal) gonzo (slang) insane, loopy (informal) mad, not all there, not right in the head, nuts (slang) nutty (slang) nutty as a fruitcake (slang) off one's rocker (slang) off one's trolley (slang) out to lunch (informal) up the pole (informal) wacko or whacko (informal)

    Please move on.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 07:47 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    “5.
    a. A contortion or distortion of the body, especially the face.”

    Especially the face. Not the foot, not the ankle, not the neck, but ESPECIALLY THE FACE.

    This is great, a bunch of Brits and yankees and not one can give an example on how a word is used. A word from their own dictionary that they even deny the meaning of :)

    yanqui!
    Can you show me an example where the word twist is used, and where it means what the dictionary says it does? No?
    Great, then I'm done with you.

    Learn your own language.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 08:05 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • mastershakejb

    nutcase ragerambling spazzing to himself while everyone else laughs at him^

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 08:18 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    Wow thank goodness I am not a teacher.
    blockheads are so frustrating

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 08:32 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    86
    I know it hurts, mate
    But don't worry, some day you'll get the hang of your language as well.
    Despair not.

    Is there no Brit here that can show me an example where the word twist is used, meaning “a distortion or contortion of the face”, as the dictionary says?

    All you can do is insult and pretend the dictionary doesn't mention it?

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 08:33 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • mastershakejb

    lol, only person hurting right now, is Cristina, after hearing Mujica's comments about her and her husband

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 08:48 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    CFK is sending cronies around with bags of U$ to try to keep the exchange rate down.
    How stupid are these people?
    Don't they know you can't fight the market?

    It also looks like the price controls are breaking..
    I wonder if inflation will be closer to 40% this year
    probably

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 09:01 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Anbar

    “Learn your own language.”

    lololol

    COuldnt be bothered to read the thread but is Stevie STILL trying to tell the english how to speak english?

    Crikey - this Stevie guy is AMAZING.

    Not only does he know everything about the English language, common usage and colloquialisms, he's also an expert on Military Dictatorships (well, thats what he says in another thread anyway).

    Maggie started the falklands war, NO Argentines supported the war, but the USA & UK were responsible for the deaths of 30,000 Argentines as they funded the Junta.

    Oh, and some bloke called Chavo was a more influential global figure than Mrs T....

    (I'm more & more certain every day i read here that this is a parallel universe!!!)

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 10:56 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    Anbar
    All I hear is bla bla bla and not a single example where the word twist is used, meaning “a distortion or contortion of the face”, as the dictionary says?
    Seems the dictionary is from a parallel universe as well.

    Lets try another dictionary, the Merriam-Webster, just to double check.

    Twist
    c: contort

    Seems Merriam-Webster is from an alternative reality as well...

    Lets try the Oxford:

    Twist
    3a distorted shape:he had a cruel twist to his mouth

    No luck there either, the Oxford one is alien too...

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 11:28 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ItalianfromEurope

    @ Stevie

    There is another expression used in Britain that can be applied to you and Argentina which has the word “twist” in it:

    “ twist someone's arm ”

    Definition:
    BULLY, coerce, force, persuade, pressurize, talk into

    Please move on.

    Apr 08th, 2013 - 11:53 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    More bla bla bla and still no answer.

    I'll better move on, yes, because if I am to wait for you lot to grasp your own language, I'll be stuck here for ages...

    Apr 09th, 2013 - 12:25 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • mastershakejb

    Stevie
    lol, we're still waiting for you to understand your own language (spanish) first, then you can try to learn english
    vieja meant old hag
    baboso meant slobbering idiot

    Apr 09th, 2013 - 06:20 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Stevie

    95
    Ok, viejo baboso, lets leave it at that.

    Apr 09th, 2013 - 08:15 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • lsolde

    ln my dictionary there are 31 different uses for the word “twist”.
    The only conection l can find between “twist” & “face” is example #14, which states:- “twist- to turn so as to face in another direction”
    page 1110, the Pocket Macquarie Dictionary 1989.
    Think you might have some crossed(or twisted!)wires there, Stevie.
    Who cares, anyway?

    Apr 09th, 2013 - 08:55 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    I think there is a littl panic in the air as YPF is begging th eothe refineries to help them make up the shortfall from the fire.
    Except everyone is already running at full capacity
    Rut Ro
    I guess they'll have to import more
    but they're already way above last years fuel imports
    the monthly balance of trade has reversed
    and what does that do children?
    Uses up reserves
    Hmm supporting the peso with U$ and buying fuel
    I very much doubt they have enough to do one of those and certainly not both
    I hope the winter in BA is really cold, super cold, cold cold cold for at least 3 weeks.

    Apr 09th, 2013 - 12:13 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Welsh Wizard

    I've got a good one...no, you'll really like this. How about we take the number of judges in the judicial council and increase it from 13 to 19. We'll get political parties to put forward the extra 6 wholly independent judges and then...this is the best bit...we'll let people vote for the favourite judge! Obviously this won't be simple so there will probably have to be some kind of X-Factor style Judge-off between the proposed wholly independent judges to see who is the best qualified for the position.

    I can't think why we haven't gone for Judge-Factor in the UK...

    Apr 09th, 2013 - 02:05 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • golfcronie

    Stevie
    You are twisted now sod off

    Apr 09th, 2013 - 06:45 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • John Troll the 3rd

    So here again, the ever more rotten Brits crying in the other page about Argentina not fawning over Thatcher's death (I find it refreshing that no release was made, I'm sick of ridiculous diplomatic pleasantries, so slimy and so British to be so fake), but here they have no problem if world leaders talk shit about a dead Argentine president.

    The biggest lie is that they pretend this hypocrisy somehow escapes them. I am so grateful to have come to this website. Before last year I really had no opinions on the Brits and on the whole I even like them, now I loathe them with all my energy.

    Apr 10th, 2013 - 04:16 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • yankeeboy

    101. Oh no a slum child from a corrupt banana republic hates people from UK because they shed light his gov't brainwashing and he now realizes they are better than him.
    Oh no a whole year learning English and now he won't have anyone to talk to.

    Whaa Whaa Whaa

    Psst Toby...no one cares.

    Apr 10th, 2013 - 10:03 am - Link - Report abuse 0

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