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People living longer, both in rich and poor countries, says latest WHO report

Monday, May 19th 2014 - 13:54 UTC
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“Global life expectancy has improved because fewer children are dying before their fifth birthday” said Dr Margaret Chan “Global life expectancy has improved because fewer children are dying before their fifth birthday” said Dr Margaret Chan
A girl who was born in 2012 can expect to live to around 73 years, and a boy to the age of 68, but there is a major rich-poor divide. A girl who was born in 2012 can expect to live to around 73 years, and a boy to the age of 68, but there is a major rich-poor divide.

People everywhere are living longer, according to the World Health Statistics 2014 published this week by the World Health Organization (WHO). Based on global averages, a girl who was born in 2012 can expect to live to around 73 years, and a boy to the age of 68. This is six years longer than the average global life expectancy for a child born in 1990.

WHO’s annual statistics report shows that low-income countries have made the greatest progress, with an average increase in life expectancy by 9 years from 1990 to 2012. The top six countries where life expectancy increased the most were Liberia which saw a 20-year increase (from 42 years in 1990 to 62 years in 2012) followed by Ethiopia (from 45 to 64 years), Maldives (58 to 77 years), Cambodia (54 to 72 years), Timor-Leste (50 to 66 years) and Rwanda (48 to 65 years).

“An important reason why global life expectancy has improved so much is that fewer children are dying before their fifth birthday,” says Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General.

“But there is still a major rich-poor divide: people in high-income countries continue to have a much better chance of living longer than people in low-income countries.”

A boy born in 2012 in a high-income country can expect to live to the age of around 76, which is 16 years longer than a boy born in a low-income country (age 60). For girls, the difference is even wider; a gap of 19 years separates life expectancy in high-income (82 years) and low-income countries (63 years).

Wherever they live in the world, women live longer than men. The gap between male and female life expectancy is greater in high-income countries where women live around six years longer than men. In low-income countries, the difference is around three years.

Women in Japan have the longest life expectancy in the world at 87 years, followed by Spain, Switzerland and Singapore. Female life expectancy in all the top 10 countries was 84 years or longer. Life expectancy among men is 80 years or more in nine countries, with the longest male life expectancy in Iceland, Switzerland and Australia.

“In high-income countries, much of the gain in life expectancy is due to success in tackling non-communicable diseases,” says Dr Ties Boerma, Director of the Department of Health Statistics and Information Systems at WHO.

“Fewer men and women are dying before they get to their 60th birthday from heart disease and stroke. Richer countries have become better at monitoring and managing high blood pressure for example.”

Declining tobacco use is also a key factor in helping people live longer in several countries.

At the other end of the scale, life expectancy for both men and women is still less than 55 years in nine sub-Saharan African countries – Angola, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lesotho, Mozambique, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.
 

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  • Anglotino

    Nice to see Australia comes in third for male life expectancy. Along with lucky genes I should see out 100 easily.

    Though I'm wondering if Australia's life expectancy would be higher if it didn't have such a high immigration programme? Iceland and Switzerland whilst allowing a lot of European immigration don't have the breadth of our programme.

    Either way I guess I statistically speaking have a long way to go.

    May 19th, 2014 - 09:24 pm 0
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