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US and India clash over food security clause at WTO and suspends TFA protocol

Wednesday, August 6th 2014 - 08:54 UTC
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“The fact we do not have a conclusion means that we are entering a new phase in our work, a phase which strikes me as being full of uncertainties,” Azevedo “The fact we do not have a conclusion means that we are entering a new phase in our work, a phase which strikes me as being full of uncertainties,” Azevedo

The failure of the two major players in global trade negotiations to bridge their differences has put paid to the adoption of the protocol of amendment for implementation of the contested Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) for the time being.

India and the United States failed at the World Trade Organization (WTO) to reach agreement on construction of a legally binding decision on a “permanent peace clause” that would further strengthen what was decided for public distribution programs for food security in developing countries at the ninth ministerial meeting in Bali, Indonesia, last year.

New Delhi made its choice clear to Azevedo: either members (of the WTO) agree to a permanent solution for food security or postpone adoption of the TFA protocol until there are credible outcomes on all issues, by the end of the year.

The Bali decision on food security was one of the nine non-binding best endeavor outcomes agreed by trade ministers on agriculture and development.

For industrialized and leading economic tigers in the developing world, the TFA – which would harmonize customs procedures in the developing world on a par with the industrialized countries – is a major mechanism for market access into the developing and poorest countries.

WTO Director-General Roberto Azevedo, who had put all his energies over the last seven months into ensuring the timely adoption of the TFA protocol by July 31 as set out in the Bali ministerial declaration, was clearly upset with the failure to adopt the protocol.

“The fact we do not have a conclusion means that we are entering a new phase in our work – a phase which strikes me as being full of uncertainties,” Azevedo told the delegates at the concluding session of the General Council, which is the highest WTO decision-taking body between ministerial meetings.

The Bail ministerial declaration was adopted at the WTO’s ninth ministerial meeting in December last year. It resulted in a binding multilateral agreement on trade facilitation along with non-binding outcomes on nine other decisions raised by developing and poorest countries, including an interim solution on public distribution programs for food security.

The developing and poorest countries remained unhappy with the Bali package even though their trade ministers endorsed the deal. The countries of the South resented what they saw as the “foster parent treatment” accorded to their concerns in agriculture and development.

While work on clearing the way for the speedy implementation of the TFA has preceded at brisk pace at the WTO over the last seven months, other issues were somewhat neglected. Several African and South American countries, as well as India, remained unhappy with the lack of progress in issues concerning agriculture and development, particularly in public distribution programs for food security.

Last week, India fired the first salvo at the WTO by declaring that unless there are “credible” outcomes in the development dossier of the Bali package, including a permanent solution for food security, it would not join the consensus to adopt the TFA. Bolivia, Venezuela and Cuba shared India’s concerns.

Despite concerted political lobbying by leading US administration officials and envoys from Western countries in New Delhi to change its stand, the Indian government informed the WTO director-general that it wanted a substantive outcome on food security, without which it would oppose the TFA protocol.

New Delhi made its choice clear to Azevedo: either members agree to a permanent solution for food security or postpone adoption of the TFA protocol until there are credible outcomes on all issues, by the end of the year.
 

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  • sj_ken

    If India and the other developing countries had followed China's lead in controlling population growth, there would be fewer concerns of food security. With the exploding population growth in third world countries, no thing will ever provide food security.

    Aug 06th, 2014 - 10:10 am 0
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