MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, November 29th 2022 - 07:56 UTC

 

 

Argentina comes to a halt as transport unions shut-down buses, trains, subways, air traffic

Wednesday, June 10th 2015 - 05:01 UTC
Full article 34 comments
The usually busy and chaotic Buenos Aires City came to a complete halt, including port services and airline operations The usually busy and chaotic Buenos Aires City came to a complete halt, including port services and airline operations
Anibal Fernandez, called it a “political strike designed to generate confusion” adding “they are obstructing people who want to go to work” Anibal Fernandez, called it a “political strike designed to generate confusion” adding “they are obstructing people who want to go to work”
The unions involved reject the government’s bid to cap salary increases at 27%, complaining the figure does not keep pace with an inflation forecast of 30% The unions involved reject the government’s bid to cap salary increases at 27%, complaining the figure does not keep pace with an inflation forecast of 30%

A strike by Argentine transport workers caused chaos for Buenos Aires commuters and forced airlines to cancel flights on Tuesday as the government accused unions of playing pre-election politics.

 Unions set up road blocks at dawn on the main roads into the capital, as commuters carpooled or rented vehicles in an effort to get to work despite the 24-hour shut-down of the bus, train and subway systems.

Ports, garbage collection and fuel deliveries were also paralyzed. All domestic flights were cancelled for the day, as were some international flights, airport officials said.

“Airlines aren’t operating. But since everyone knew about the strike beforehand, there aren’t any passengers anyway,” said a source at airport management company Aeropuertos Argentina 2000.

The strike, announced on May 12, is the second this year and the latest in a series launched by unions opposed to President Cristina Fernandez' government.

The three unions involved reject the government’s bid to cap salary increases at 27%, complaining the figure does not keep pace with inflation forecast to come in at 30% this year.

They also oppose an income tax they say hurts the lowest earners because the threshold salary subjected to the tax has not been updated to keep pace with inflation.

Union leader Juan Carlos Schmid said the strike would send a “strong signal” to the government that takes power in December, after general elections on October 25 that will choose a successor to Cristina Fernandez.

The president’s cabinet chief, Anibal Fernandez, called it a “political strike designed to generate confusion.”

“They are obstructing people who want to go to work, the vast majority of the population,” he said.

Several unions, including in the banking and commerce sectors, did not join the strike because they have recently signed new contracts. Banking and oil crushers unions managed 35%, but split into a basic 27% plus 'productivity' gains to complete the 35%.

Categories: Economy, Politics, Argentina.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Enrique Massot

    These are not union leaders looking for the interests of the workers. They are sold-outs who have aligned with the opposition to support a conservative government in the October presidential election.
    Hugo Moyano, leader of the CGT, is of the ilk of former union bureaucrats Rogelio Coria, Jose Ignacio Rucci and Saul Ubaldini.

    Jun 10th, 2015 - 05:31 am 0
  • Englander

    No public transport - paradise.

    Jun 10th, 2015 - 06:00 am 0
  • LEPRecon

    @1 Enrique

    No the people are fed up of rampant inflation, rampant corruption, and the FACT that children are starving to DEATH in YOUR beloved Cristina's PARADISE.

    The people are fed up with not being able to afford staples, such as bread. They are fed up that they can't get medicines or treatment because of Cristina's INSANE economic policies that mean the cost of any item imported has to have Argentine produce of the EXACT same amount exported.

    I mean what hospital could afford, not only to buy for example, US$32,000 worth of drugs, but then also have to buy US$32,000 worth of soy, and then somehow find someone abroad who wants to buy that soy!

    It's complete and utter MADNESS.

    But it doesn't affect you, does it Enrique? Your nice and safe in a country where there aren't shortages, where there is a sensible economic policy, which is, compared to Argentina, ACTUALLY paradise.

    Why don't you be a man and return to the paradise of Argentina that you love so much? Why don't you go there and support your beloved President and her policies? Why don't you go and see the invisible poor who are starving slowly to death, but the government denies even exist?

    Why don't you go and try and live on less than $6 a day, which according to your beloved Cristina is ALL anyone needs to live?

    Go on put your money where your mouth is and go and live in Cristina's paradise, which is everyone else's hell.

    Jun 10th, 2015 - 06:38 am 0
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!