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Corbyn tells BBC he will not campaign for Britain to leave the European Union

Thursday, September 17th 2015 - 10:03 UTC
Full article 10 comments
Mr. Corbyn, who took part in his first prime minister's questions (PMQs) on Wednesday, has also questioned if he should have to join the Privy Council. Mr. Corbyn, who took part in his first prime minister's questions (PMQs) on Wednesday, has also questioned if he should have to join the Privy Council.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has told the BBC that he will not campaign for Britain to leave the European Union. Mr. Corbyn said that while policy was “developing” he could not foresee a situation where Labor would campaign for a “Brexit” under his leadership. He has come under growing pressure from Labour MPs to clarify his position.

 Mr. Corbyn, who took part in his first prime minister's questions (PMQs) on Wednesday, has also questioned if he should have to join the Privy Council.

In a wide-ranging interview with the BBC's political editor Laura Kuenssberg, he would not commit to taking part in the historic Privy Council ceremony, which requires senior politicians to kneel before the Queen.

He also said it was “very strange” his decision not to sing the national anthem at a service commemorating the Battle of Britain had attracted so much interest, insisting he had “respected the sacrifice” of those who had fought and died.

Asked about potential disagreements with shadow cabinet members, many of whom did not back his leadership bid, he said there would be discussions ahead.

He also urged colleagues to respect his mandate and insisted the final decision on policy would be his.

Mr. Corbyn used his first PMQs to put questions from members of the public to David Cameron, an approach which he said meant “people's voices would be heard”.

Telling MPs that he wanted to make PMQs “less theatrical” and more in touch with public concerns, he asked six questions on housing, tax credits and mental health which he said had been suggested to him by members of the public.

Mr. Cameron, who began his own career as opposition leader in 2005 promising to end “Punch and Judy” politics, said “no one would be more delighted than me” if PMQs could become a “genuine exercise in asking questions and answering questions”.

Categories: Politics, International.

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  • darragh

    Of course he won't campaign to leave the EU. He is a believer in the old Stalinist concepts of agricultural collectivisation and industrial five year plans and wants to spread them throughout his vision of a European Soviet.

    I saw most of the above interview and I admit he seemed and I emphasis 'seemed' to be a nice reasonable man. Even the BBC's political correspondent (can't remember name) fell for it by praising Corbyn for not coming with prepared answers - yeah OK, if you believe that then you'll believe anything.

    Definition of a politician - someone who can lie with a straight face

    Sep 17th, 2015 - 11:51 am 0
  • Redrow

    @1
    Expectations were so low at PMQs that the fact he didn't throw up was seen as a success. He read out some E-mails, let Cameron knock them all into touch and that was that. A UK commentator pointed out that while today his performance was considered OK, when he is replaced in a year or two people will ask “Do you remember how terrible his first PMQs was?”.

    Whether he can withstand serious questioning will only be determined once Andrew Neil has had a go. Most politicians have no more than one or two dodgy photos or quotes for the Press Office to have to defuse, but Corbyn and McDonnell each have a drawerful for the media to trawl through - so it is almost hard to make mud stick at this point.

    Having changed his view on Europe (since Sunday night) it will be interesting what other principles he will have to replace.

    Sep 17th, 2015 - 12:27 pm 0
  • ElaineB

    He probably is a very nice man but that has very little to do with his ability to run the country or the opposition. He is plainly unprepared and looks astonished to find himself in such a position.

    He is reinventing himself by the hour as he had to. His idealism was just that and not practical to apply in reality. Unfortunately he is going to look a bit of a fool for a while yet. For instance, before his election he refused to be interviewed in a car as he felt they were bad for the environment. After his election he has accepted an official car and driver. As he should.

    Whatever victory the far-left thought they had by getting him elected by 250,000 members of the Labour Party is hollow. For him to effect any change at all he has to gain the support of Labour voters and they sit in the centre of the political views.

    The thing is, in the UK we don't support a political party like a football team. It is not for life. We are far more sophisticated in choosing the right party for the right time. And we never embrace extremism.

    Sep 17th, 2015 - 01:03 pm 0
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