MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, December 5th 2022 - 05:05 UTC

 

 

Trump's victory seen from Argentina as a global tendency in Western economies

Friday, November 11th 2016 - 07:04 UTC
Full article 4 comments
Fraga argues that Trump's triumph is a global tendency, such was the case with the UK and Brexit, and with similar tendencies in France and Germany Fraga argues that Trump's triumph is a global tendency, such was the case with the UK and Brexit, and with similar tendencies in France and Germany
Opponents of globalization argue it increased inequality in Western economies. Many who voted for Trump did out of economic frustration and of social fury. Opponents of globalization argue it increased inequality in Western economies. Many who voted for Trump did out of economic frustration and of social fury.
Macri during his campaign had to live with the open support for his opponent Daniel Scioli from most South American presidents      Macri during his campaign had to live with the open support for his opponent Daniel Scioli from most South American presidents

Under the heading of “Trump and Argentina”, political analyst Rosendo Fraga outlines what he believes are the reasons for the US tycoon victory in the presidential election, which he links to similar conditions in UK and the Brexit, and possible surprises next year both in France and Germany, the four leading Western economies.

 Fraga begins by saying that Trump's triumph is a global tendency, such was the case with the UK and Brexit, and with similar tendencies in France and Germany with the following factors: an upsurge of nationalism as a value; a protectionism claim in the economic field; rejection of immigration, socially and an overall “anti-political” system feeling, that is against traditional politics.

And in this context, Trump is the US version of this growing tendency in the West.

Supporters of globalization argue, and with reason, that it has helped to bring down poverty in such emerging powers as China and India.

Opponents argue, and with reason that it has increased inequality, but this is in the Western developed economies. Half of those who voted for Trump did it out of economic frustration and of social fury.

In a more domestic approach Fraga criticizes the Argentine government for having openly supported Hillary Clinton, which he describes as a “conceptual error”. He adds presidents and foreign ministers, as a matter of principle, should not be involved in the electoral processes of other countries.

Last year, current Argentine president Mauricio Macri had to live with the open support for his opponent, Daniel Scioli, from the presidents of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff; Tabare Vazquez, Uruguay; Michelle Bachelet, Chile; Evo Morales, Bolivia; Rafeal Correa and Venezuela's Nicolas Maduro, and even open campaigning from ex Uruguayan president Jose Mujica, all of which received him as if he had been elected and anticipated his victory.

But this did not happen and it was a major political error since the bets were on the losing Argentine presidential candidate.

In the case of Trump his rancor could have a negative influence but it is also true that Argentina's Macri is the only South American president in office who Trump knows since they were involved in business dealings during the eighties, and this could help proximity.

But for South America, concludes Fraga the problem emerging from Trump's victory is uncertainty regarding interest rates for countries highly indebted and the increase of protectionism for those exporters of commodities, and their price.

More specifically for Argentina it is hard to expect from Trump, the close relation Macri managed with Obama during his first year in office, particularly when the US president during his visit to Argentina said that “Macri was an example for the region”.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Pete Bog

    “In a more domestic approach Fraga criticizes the Argentine government for having openly supported Hillary Clinton,”

    To be fair from an Argentine point of view, of course they would, it was Clinton a few years ago after talking to the Botox Queen, who suggested that the UK should enter sovereignty negotiations with Argentina. I would be most surprised to see Trump suggest that. I may be disappointed but it is on the cards that Trump may well back the Falkland Islanders rather than take a neutral stance, If they have the sense to talk to him. Time will tell.

    Nov 11th, 2016 - 02:20 pm 0
  • chronic

    Trump is an anglophile.

    Support rg to the detriment of the UK?

    I don't think so.

    Macaroni bet on the wrong pony.

    Nov 11th, 2016 - 02:59 pm 0
  • NosTrolldamus the 16th

    You know, let me tell you something... wt-- with all these analysts in North America, Europe, here at home, and elsewhere now coming out to arrive at this conclusion. We don't need them!

    The world has ME.

    Everyone here may hate my guts, but what they can't deny me is I called it RIGHT.

    I am on record here since at least 2012, that a new wave of Anglo Supremacism was on the horizon, and in a broader sense a revival of EUian nationalistic and racist culture.

    I said it here for YEARS, using phrases like the following: the 4th Reich is coming to an island in Europe, the USA will head down the toilet in 2016, the EUians will revert back to their genetic form.... Again, I am on record for several years on these calls.

    I guess I trully am a seer!

    (or maybe I just observe well)

    Nov 11th, 2016 - 05:11 pm -1
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!