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Montevideo, June 16th 2019 - 05:00 UTC

Theresa May and Juncker issue joint statement and agree to further meetings

Friday, February 8th 2019 - 09:18 UTC
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Senior officials urged Mrs. May to grasp an olive branch from opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn that echoed EU proposals for a permanent EU-UK customs union Senior officials urged Mrs. May to grasp an olive branch from opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn that echoed EU proposals for a permanent EU-UK customs union

British Prime Minister Theresa May came away from a day in an increasingly impatient Brussels on Thursday with a pledge of renewed talks that held out some hope for a new Brexit deal, if no sign of compromise yet. Ms May is scheduled to fly to Dublin this Friday.

Senior EU officials urged her to grasp an olive branch from Labour opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn that echoed EU proposals for a permanent EU-UK customs union as a way to end deadlock on the Irish border “backstop”.

But EU sources said May had given little sign of how she planned to secure parliamentary support.

Dispatched by parliament to revise an accord she struck with the EU that European leaders refuse to reopen, May flew into a storm provoked by the EU's Donald Tusk, who wished a “special place in hell” on those who had promoted Brexit with no clear plan for how to achieve it.

Despite frustration among Europe's governments at May's inability to win support at home for the deal she agreed in November, EU Council President Tusk and Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker stressed a willingness to be flexible.

Juncker and May issued a joint statement after what they called a “robust” discussion. It set out her demand for a legally binding change to the “backstop” plan to avoid customs checks on the Irish border, and his insistence that the other 27 EU member states would not reopen that agreement.

However, Juncker said the bloc would look at adding wording to the separate political declaration on future trade terms to see if a closer relationship could be agreed on - one that EU officials say would render the backstop, under which Britain could be stuck with EU rules for years, largely redundant.

“It is not going to be easy,” May told a British television reporter.

“But crucially, President Juncker and I have agreed that talks will now start to find a way through this, to find a way to get this over the line and to deliver on the concerns that parliament has so we get a majority in parliament.

”What I see and hear from leaders is a desire for us to work together to ensure that we can deliver the UK leaving the European Union with a deal,“ she added.

She will meet Juncker again before the end of the month as time gets perilously short for any kind of deal before Britain leaves on March 29. Tusk was cautious though, tweeting: ”Still no breakthrough in sight. Talks will continue.”

Categories: Economy, Politics, International.

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