MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, December 1st 2021 - 06:38 UTC

 

 

Chilean consumer prices rose 0.3% in March, and 3.7% in twelve months

Thursday, April 9th 2020 - 14:57 UTC
Full article 2 comments
Chile´s economy has been hammered by mass protests over inequality that began in late 2019 and now, the coronavirus outbreak Chile´s economy has been hammered by mass protests over inequality that began in late 2019 and now, the coronavirus outbreak

Chile consumer prices rose 0.3% in March, the government's statistics agency said on Wednesday, pushed upwards by a rise in food and education costs but counterbalanced by a fall in transportation prices.

Annual inflation hit 3.7%, nearing the upper limit of the central bank's 2% to 4% range, the agency said.

Chile´s economy has been hammered in recent months by mass protests over inequality that began in late 2019 and now, the coronavirus outbreak. The world´s top copper producer has confirmed more than 5,000 cases of the virus, among the highest tallies in Latin America.

Increasing uncertainty in what was once the region´s most stable economy has driven the peso down against the dollar, at times to historical lows.

Chile´s central bank has twice slashed interest rates in the past month to help bolster the local currency and combat a predicted “severe economic contraction.”

The bank said in March falling global oil prices amid the global coronavirus pandemic would ease inflationary pressure in Chile, where the vast majority of fossil fuels are imported.

Categories: Economy, Chile.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • pgerman

    Argentina has ten times the chilean inflation but the Gobernment said that it is for the coronavirus. While the chilean risk country is around 110 points the argentinian risk country is around 4,000 points ...it seems that Chile is not part of the World....

    Apr 09th, 2020 - 03:22 pm 0
  • Marti Llazo

    When the legions of little latter-day Che Guevara vandal darlings cause some US$2 billion in damages during and after their Red October, to a little country like Chile, someone has got to pay, and it isn't Moya. Their peso devalued by about 20 percent even before the virus caught up with them. And since they import such a large part of their goods and services, that devaluation, for which their Reds are directly responsible, makes things more expensive.

    Apr 10th, 2020 - 03:02 am 0
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!