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Montevideo, September 27th 2022 - 01:53 UTC

 

 

Argentina looks out to the Sea, and celebrates its maritime space is double the land territory

Monday, July 18th 2022 - 08:45 UTC
Full article 9 comments
Admiral Storni at the beginning of last century is credited for having pointed out the significance of Argentine sea resources and relevance as a development factor Admiral Storni at the beginning of last century is credited for having pointed out the significance of Argentine sea resources and relevance as a development factor

Argentina on Sunday celebrated the “Day of Argentina's Sea interests,” instated in Law 25,860 in honor of Admiral Segundo Storni, who is considered the great sponsor of a national debate on sea issues and seafaring activities, focused as a State policy.

Admiral Storni at the beginning of last century is credited for having pointed out to the significance of Argentine sea resources and relevance as a factor for the country's development, plus the ocean as a gate to trade and to the world.

And in this overview, the Admiral allegedly indicated as the main strategic points for the implementation of such state policies, “the Malvinas, South Georgia, South Sandwich Islands, Argentine Antarctica and the South Atlantic”.

In the release the Argentine foreign ministry states that the occasion is appropriate to reflect on the magnitude of the Argentine maritime spaces, which double mainland territory, plus its significance for the sovereignty rights Argentina possesses over the maritime spaces and insular territories.

The release adds that facts confirm what Sorni had anticipated, 80% of world trade is transported by sea, and according to UN, more than three billion people depend on maritime and coastal diversity for their subsistence. Oceans are also closely linked to global climate change since they absorb most of the heat generated by human activities and greenhouse emission gases.

Argentina is implementing different policies to better protect and sustain its resources, clearly focused in making effective the sovereignty exercise of the country in its maritime spaces, among which patrol and control of jurisdictional waters; actions to end illegal, unregulated and undeclared fishing; marine scientific research in coordination with the Blue Pampa Initiative; creating a System of Maritime Protected Areas; cooperation in multilateral forae, as well as regionally and bilaterally.

Finally “these actions are evidence of Argentina's bi-continental and oceanic condition and underline the relevance of maritime issues for Argentine foreign policy. in the framework of a sovereign development project, both federal and austral, and with a country clearly looking out to the sea”.

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  • Terence Hill

    “Argentina on Sunday celebrated the “Day of Argentina's Sea interests,” instated in Law … the Admiral allegedly indicated as the main strategic points for the implementation of such state policies, “the Malvinas, …”

    Will they be celebrating the demise of those poor sods who were `dissapeared’?

    Jul 18th, 2022 - 09:40 am +1
  • Pugol-H

    ‘A country clearly looking out to the sea’.

    Marvellous.

    And what do you see when you look out to sea from Creole occupied Wallmapu???

    Oh yes, British territory, the Pirates haven’t gone away you know.

    Sovereignty of the S. Atlantic/Antarctic was settled long before Admiral Segundo Storni was even born.

    ‘making effective the sovereignty exercise of the country in its maritime spaces’.

    ‘a sovereign development project’.

    Unilateral and illegitimate actions by Argentina, not compatible with Resolution 31/49 from the UN General Assembly, calling both on Argentina and UK to abstain from adopting decisions which mean the introduction of unilateral modifications of the situation.

    Clearly, the British military base is the only thing keeping the peace down there.

    Jul 18th, 2022 - 02:55 pm +1
  • Terence Hill

    Firstly, title based on contiguity has no standing in international law.

    ”International Court of Justice (ICJ) in the North Sea continental shelf cases, in which Denmark and the Netherlands based their claim inter alia on the doctrine of proximity, i.e., that the part of the continental shelf closest to the part of the state in question falls automatically under that state's jurisdiction. In these cases the ICJ rejected any contiguity type of approach. As for continuity, it is argued, the 1958 Geneva Convention on the Continental Shelf and Contiguous Zone, Article 1, now contained in the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, Article 76, does not support the view that coastal states have sovereignty over islands above the continental shelf. On the contary it laid down doctrine that islands had their own “continental shelves,” p.74 The Falklands/Malvinas Case Breaking the Deadlock in the Anglo-Argentine... By Roberto C. Laver

    Jul 18th, 2022 - 03:19 pm +1
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