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Urgent summit in Peru to advance transfer of Unasur presidency from Paraguay

Monday, June 25th 2012 - 18:56 UTC
Full article 10 comments

An urgent summit of the Union of South American Nations, Unasur, will address the crisis in Paraguay following the removal of President Fernando Lugo, this coming Wednesday in Peru, announced Ecuadorian president Rafael Correa, although there has been no official confirmation from Lima. Read full article

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  • Pugol-H

    So now Ecuador tells Paraguay how their constitution has to work.

    They (other SA countries) really don’t like the idea of Parliaments exercising democratic control.

    Paraguay needs to be careful though, look what happened last time they argued with so many other S American neighbours, country ended half the size and what was left was destroyed.

    Perhaps Ecuador is hoping to carve out some Paraguayan territory for themselves.

    Jun 25th, 2012 - 07:17 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Leiard

    What is disgraceful is that Paraguay is not allowed to present its case !

    Jun 25th, 2012 - 07:29 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • cornishair

    “parliamentary coup” ???? wtf, have i missed something

    Jun 25th, 2012 - 07:51 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Monkeymagic

    I agree with the delegator from Ecuador. Governments should be democratic and represent the people. The right to self determination is a founding principle of the UN. All people in South America should have that right.

    Jun 25th, 2012 - 07:58 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • rnbgr

    I agree the removal of Lugo was without any due process, I don't know the president of Ecudor who has tried to jail and fine opposition press for insulting the president is the right one to take the lead on this

    Jun 25th, 2012 - 08:05 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Forgetit87

    #1

    No one's telling Paraguay how to run its country. I mean, we're giving advices, using multilateral tools, but that is all. There's no forceful intervention in Paraguay's domestic matters. We aren't bombing the country because it doesn't comply with our values and saying it can't have nuclear weapons whilst we grow an arsenal of hundreds of warheads. Wait, this is another country but you get the point.

    #5

    Actually, Correa's action against that opposition newspaper was not only because of the dictator insult. It was also because the newspaper (I forget its name but it isn't hard to find) accused him of crimes against humanity by initiating a fire on a hospital, or something like that. Go there, write on a blog or a newspaper that the Queen burned down some charity headquarters and then you tell me how much freer the British press is compared to Ecuador's.

    Jun 25th, 2012 - 08:53 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ChrisR

    6 Forgetit87

    You are omitting an important point about the coward Correa: he was hiding in the hospital from a crowd of his 'beloved' people who wanted to kill him. Quite reasonably as I remember at the time.

    That is why he fired the hospital. He is an abject coward and should not be the President of a chicken coup, but it is Ecuador, so WTF?

    “No one's telling Paraguay how to run its country. I mean, we're giving advices, using multilateral tools, but that is all. There's no forceful intervention in Paraguay's domestic matters.” YET!

    You make yourself look foolish by supporting the likes of Chavez, for that is what The Mad Bitch of Argentina is after. Making 'Dead Man Walking' into a full member of Mercosur and to watch her own back against those in her country who would like to get rid of HER.

    As far as it has been reported this was an impeachment. A legal device to get rid of a rogue President.

    And before you bleat on about the British. Cameron could face a question of no confidence at any time, the vote taken the same day, and he could be over to see the Queen to present his resignation. Less than 24 hours.

    The difference is of course between our politicians and what you call lawmakers, is this: when things go wrong in a big way our politicians get chucked out legally by the British system, not a bunch of self-centred, narcissist crooks from other countries playing at having something they are incapable of ever attaining - honesty.

    Jun 25th, 2012 - 10:25 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Forgetit87

    You do love your 'voice', don't you?

    1 - “he was hiding in the hospital from a crowd of his 'beloved' people who wanted to kill him.”

    He was hiding from rogue police officers. And hiding from a mob, and an armed one at that, doesn't make him a coward. Tell me that you would offer yourself in sacrifice in his place, and I'll tell you're either a luny or a liar.

    2 - “YET!”

    So you believe there will be an armed intervention in Paraguay. Then it's decided, you're a luny.

    3 - “You make yourself look foolish by supporting the likes of Chavez”

    Who said anything about Chávez? Luny.

    4 - “As far as it has been reported this was an impeachment. A legal device to get rid of a rogue President.”

    He wasn't trialed or had a chance at presenting a defense, as the PY constitution determines. The impeachment thus wasn't legal and this point has been made by people from different parts of the political spectrum.

    5 - “Cameron could face a question of no confidence at any time, the vote taken the same day, and he could be over to see the Queen to present his resignation.”

    ??????

    Jun 25th, 2012 - 10:33 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ChrisR

    8 Forgetit87

    From your somewhat ludicrous postings here, I cannot figure out if your tag refers to your advanced age.

    “You do love your 'voice', don't you?” If you are referring to my use of the English language, I will take that as a compliment, thank you.

    1) Is that so? Then why did you not use it in your post? BTW which paper did you get that fantasy from, not the one whose owner was charged and condemned by a 'judge' (I use this in the LatAm sense: a crook).

    2) Is it not true that the bunch of cretins presently decrying the lawful impeachment went to war with Paraguay? So why change the habit of a continent?

    3) No-one said anything about Chavez, BUT that is what is implied by this action. Please read my previous post again.

    4) Wrong. I take it that by “people from different parts of the political spectrum” you are referring to Mercosur and the agreement made in Argentina in 1998? That was for countries lacking in any process referred to in the agreement. Paraguay has a process of impeachment. It is lawful and was applied correctly by all accounts.

    Lugo is less than saintly (get it? He's a Bishop) given the manner in which he came to power.

    5) I see I need to make the blindingly obvious evem more blindingly obvious for you. You were mouthing off about the UK and our Queen, trying, as you always do, to score points from your perception of our weaknesses.

    In the UK there is a system known as 'undergoing a vote of no confidence'. This mechanism, founded in the House of Commons rules, allows the House to get rid of ruling parties who have overstepped the boundaries of resonableness. You know, like the stunts The Mad Bitch of Argentina has pulled in the last few months. Do you understand now?

    Finally, luny is spelt looney, you looney. Got it now?

    Jun 26th, 2012 - 12:29 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Pugol-H

    @6 Forgetit87
    Actually you’re missing the point here.

    The question is, is it a constitutionally correct procedure in Paraguay, or not.

    If the answer is yes, then there is nothing more to be said it’s democratic, no one else’s business but Paraguay’s.

    You are trying to interfere in Paraguay’s internal constitutional affairs by diplomatic pressure (isolation from regional bodies), and threats of “implications for trade” to a land locked country.

    You may be using “soft power” instead of “hard power”, but the objectives and end results are the same, only the means is different.

    And yes:

    Cameron could be called by Parliament to a vote of no confidence, lose it, and be off to see the Queen to resign all in the same day.

    That’s how our system works Parliament has the power to decide, as it is the directly elected body.

    Jun 26th, 2012 - 05:09 pm - Link - Report abuse 0

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