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Falklands’ conflict erupts as example for current Japan/China clash over disputed islands

Friday, August 30th 2013 - 23:30 UTC
Full article 12 comments
Deputy PM Taro Aso: “unavoidable that Japan will increase their budget and spending on defense” Deputy PM Taro Aso: “unavoidable that Japan will increase their budget and spending on defense”

Japan’s outspoken Finance minister and Deputy Prime Minister Taro Aso said that the Japanese government needs to make it clear that they intend to defend the Senkaku Islands from whatever invading force. This is to avoid what happened to the Falkland Islands when Argentine troops triggered a war with British forces by landing on the disputed islands in 1982.

According to Japan Daily News, Aso told the parliamentary in Yokohama that Britain failed to inform Argentina that it was deploying forces to the Islands to protect it and as a result, Argentina invaded the Falklands, located off their southern coastline.

The Deputy PM said that three things should be present to deter other countries, referring to China in this case, from invading Japan’s territory: fighting ability, a national consensus and informing other countries about your intention to protect. Aso added that it is unavoidable that the government will increase their budget and spending on defense and it should be clearly stated that the Maritime Self Defense will be used for the defense and protection of the Senkaku Islands, claimed as the Diaoyu Islands by China.

The two countries have been at odds for the past year over the islands and attempts by Prime Minster Shinzo Abe to set talks with China have been rebuffed repeatedly. China‘s deputy foreign minister Li Baodong says they see no reason to hold talks with Japan anytime soon and find that their overtures are “not genuine”.

Li Baodong emphasized that if there will be a meeting, it should be more than “shaking hands and taking pictures”. While Japan is willing to improve relations with their neighbors, they reject any conditions set by China to formally open talks. China meanwhile has hinted they are open to a summit between their leaders but only if Japan acknowledges that there is a territorial dispute and to apologize for historical issues that have added to the diplomatic tension between the two.
 

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  • Britworker

    There is a bit if a difference between some rocks no-one lives on and islands which were settled and inhabited long before the aggressor country existed. There is no correlation between the Falklands whatsoever.
    In any event, we are not concerned about Argentinas rusting military, they can't even sail out of port. Whereas Japan has a slightly different problem with China's military lol.

    Aug 31st, 2013 - 04:02 am 0
  • LEPRecon

    This Japan Daily News really is talking out of it's arse and making stuff up, or maybe it's just reporting stuff made up by Japanese politicians.

    “Aso told the parliamentary in Yokohama that Britain failed to inform Argentina that it was deploying forces to the Islands to protect it and as a result, Argentina invaded the Falklands, located off their southern coastline.”

    The British always had a contingent of Royal Marines on the Islands, normally not more that about 40 at a time.

    There was no sudden movement of troops to the area, if there had it's doubtful Argentina would've had the guts to invade, with them being monumental cowards and all. Very brave against unarmed civilians, not so brave when the 'enemy' can shoot back at them.

    @1 Britworker

    I agree with your post. The Japanese/Chinese situation is completely different to the Falklands situation.

    Aug 31st, 2013 - 05:42 am 0
  • GeoffWard2

    The message that the Japanese take from the Falklands of 1982 is that if you don't overtly show your determination to defend, than you are seen as offering up the lands as a gift to those wishing to take it.

    But it gets progressively more costly to both parties as more and more resources are thrown into protection and threat.
    It easily gets out of hand when the paradigm becomes 'national pride'.

    Aug 31st, 2013 - 06:33 am 0
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