MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, May 27th 2019 - 05:14 UTC

Racial relations becomes political debate in the US following the Ferguson trial and verdict

Thursday, November 27th 2014 - 07:15 UTC
Full article 16 comments
Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has deployed about 2,200 National Guard troops in and around Ferguson Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has deployed about 2,200 National Guard troops in and around Ferguson
Ferguson's mayor, James Knowles, is white, as are most of its city council members. Ferguson's mayor, James Knowles, is white, as are most of its city council members.
Tensions between police and black Americans have simmered for decades. Many blacks feel the legal system and law enforcement authorities do not treat them fairly Tensions between police and black Americans have simmered for decades. Many blacks feel the legal system and law enforcement authorities do not treat them fairly

More National Guard troops and police have been sent to Ferguson, Missouri to head off a third night of violence, as over 400 people have been arrested in the St. Louis suburb and around the United States in unrest after a white policeman was cleared in the killing of an unarmed black teenager.

 There have been protests in Boston, New York, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta and other cities decrying Monday's grand jury decision not to indict officer Darren Wilson in the Aug. 9 shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in a case that has touched off a debate about race relations in the United States.

Ferguson, a predominately black city, has been hit by two nights of rioting, looting and arson with some businesses burned to the ground, but authorities say an increased security presence on Tuesday night helped quell the violence.

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has deployed about 2,200 National Guard troops in and around Ferguson. Police made 45 arrests in Ferguson in the Tuesday night protests, down from 61 in aftermath of Monday's grand jury decision.

“The ramped up presence and action of the Missouri National Guard has been helpful,” Nixon said on Wednesday after facing criticism for not deploying enough guardsman in the hours after the grand jury's decision.

Tensions between police and black Americans have simmered for decades, with many blacks feeling the U.S. legal system and law enforcement authorities do not treat them fairly. In Washington, President Barack Obama has tried to keep a lid on anger that has spilled over to other cities and garnered international attention.

Obama remained cautious in his comments in the immediate aftermath of the Ferguson shooting, but has been more expansive in recent days including remarks at the White House after the grand jury's decision. On Monday he said deep distrust exists between police and minorities and that “communities of color aren't just making these problems up.”

Russia on Wednesday pointed to rioting in Ferguson and the other protests across the United States as evidence that Moscow's detractors in Washington were hypocrites and in no position to lecture Russia on human rights.

St. Louis police said three people were arrested at a protest near City Hall on Wednesday in which activists staged a mock trial of Wilson, who told the grand jury he shot Brown because he feared for his life.

Ferguson's mayor, James Knowles, is white, as are most of its city council members. A 2013 state attorney general's report found more than 85% of motorists pulled over in the city are black, and the arrest rate among blacks is twice the rate among white residents.

Obama's Justice Department is probing the Ferguson shooting as it considers whether to bring federal civil rights charges against the officer and the police department.

Wilson said his conscience was clear. He told ABC News that there was nothing he could have done differently that would have prevented Brown's death. But the parents of the slain teenager said they did not accept the officer's version of the events.

“I don't believe a word of it,” Brown's mother Lesley McSpadden told “CBS This Morning” on Wednesday.

Categories: Politics, United States.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Brasileiro

    What country is this that kills innocent of his own people?

    Poor people!

    Nov 27th, 2014 - 10:30 am 0
  • Terence Hill

    Brazil

    Nov 27th, 2014 - 10:50 am 0
  • Klingon

    @1 He wasn't inocent, he was an escaping felon.
    Maybe the blacks should look at the lead up to this point.

    Lack of parenting, history of violence, lack of morals, values and respect of others.

    That's why that pos got shot! If he hadn't of robbed a store, assaulted the owner and been walking in the middle of the road telling people to F,,off he would probably be alive.
    Still the US media hype this up to make headlines stoking the problem.

    Nov 27th, 2014 - 10:59 am 0
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!